Irrational Shows Off BioShock Infinite Ads and Propaganda

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Irrational Shows Off BioShock Infinite Ads and Propaganda

Guns, gene-altering chemicals, and fear are apparently all big business in the flying city of Columbia.

One of the great things about a game like BioShock Infinite, for the player at least, is that by being set in the past - in this case 1912 - it opens the door up to some older styles and designs that you wouldn't normally see in a videogame. It seems that Irrational rather enjoy this aspect of the game too, as it's showing off three pieces of artwork that could have leaped fully formed out of the past.

The first pieces is an advertisement for one of the games many "vigors" - BioShock Infinite's version of the original BioShocks plasmids - and the second is for a repeating rifle, dubbed "the friend of the Indian fighter." The final piece is an example of Founder propaganda, depicting the rebellious Vox Populi faction as sub-humans who must hide from the "Songbird," a huge mechanical bird-like creature who, when it isn't dispensing "justice," also serves as Elizabeth's - the character the player has been sent to rescue - guardian. It can also been seen at the end of the BioShock Infinite gameplay trailer, albeit briefly.

The ads are the work of Irrational artist Mike Swiderek, while the propaganda poster was made by Jorge Lacera. All three will appear in the game, and in the case of the two ads, the items will also be available for the player to use. The player will undoubtedly meet the Songbird as well, but that's probably going to be a slightly more tense encounter. Hopefully, they will also appear in stores one day, as any one of them would look great hanging on the wall in poster form.

BioShock Infinite is scheduled for release on PC, PS3, and Xbox 360 some time in 2012.

Source: Irrational Games

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These look great, I can't wait for Bioshock Infinite. That Songbird one looks intriguing and slightly terrifying.

Holy crap! The songbird looks even more perplexing and terrifying than the big daddies.

I'd buy these posters to put them up at home.
Please tell me I can?

Quaxar:
I'd buy these posters to put them up at home.
Please tell me I can?

You know, you can download the image and print it on poster sized paper...

The first image is kinda creepy. I like it!

Sweet I hope that's the actual machine gun you get to use ingame, cause it looks pretty cool. Also what do you think the Bucking Bronco vigor will do?

Looking good.
Not much else to say.

th155:

Quaxar:
I'd buy these posters to put them up at home.
Please tell me I can?

You know, you can download the image and print it on poster sized paper...

image
Fuckin resolutions, how do they work.

I love irrational. Having been fortunate enough to play through System Shock 2, i have faith whatever they produce is going to be solid gold. Can't wait for Bioshock Infinite! Even if the sky feels far less oppressive and curious to set a dystopia in, unlike the sea or space. The problem is that it feels too... familiar. It's too close to what we know. After all, we've all been in airplanes before, so we've all been above the clouds. But none of us can really say we've been in a bathysphere to the bottom of the sea floor or in a space shuttle to the middle of a galaxy hundreds of years away. Not to mention the overly bright and cheerful aesthetic in Infinite going against the outright oppressive nature of Rapture's underwater paradise. Even the water itself was a metaphor for oppression, putting stress and weight on the pipes...
Though i do suffer from vertigo, and will be made uncomfortable as i play Infinite in the knowledge i will be perpetually high up with nothing to stop me falling. Regardless, i will play on, even if it starts to make me feel genuinely queasy. FOR SCIENCE!

Sorry, couldn't resist...

Want SMG. Do want.

The machine guns were all I used in 1 & 2, really.

Please, Irrational...if you take one thing from 2K Marin's Bioshock 2...don't put in the stupid inventing from Bioshock 1.

These look great. But I'll reserve judgement on the game until the reviews come in. Bioshock 2 will not happen to me again.

I love this style. I'm really looking forward to this game.

I'm hoping the special edition includes some of this material.

I'm very interested to know how they came across gene-altering chemicals at the turn of the century. It would be another forty odd years before we even knew what DNA looked like. On the other hand, the game does also feature a giant mechanical intelligent bird, and an entire floating city. Anachronisms abound.

9_6:
Looking good.
Not much else to say.

th155:

Quaxar:
I'd buy these posters to put them up at home.
Please tell me I can?

You know, you can download the image and print it on poster sized paper...

Fuckin resolutions, how do they work.

I'm not stupid. Presumably higher quality images exist on the internet somewhere. And if not, i fail to see why you can't get something of proper quality from the games files when it comes out.

th155:

Quaxar:
I'd buy these posters to put them up at home.
Please tell me I can?

You know, you can download the image and print it on poster sized paper...

I know that, but I want posters, not 8-bit pixel mash.

EDIT: That's what I get for not browsing the whole thread before answering.
Anyway, I'd find it much more convenient if they just gave away the images in appropriate size instead of me having to find a half-decent version online for paper bigger than normal A4 size.

The original Bioshock nailed 50s/60s art and decor. The juxtaposition of what we now consider quaint (look at the recent resurgence of interest in 40s/50s settings, advertising and fashion) against horrific/survival horror themes is always thoroughly unsettling; Fallout 3 did something similar, using era music, film reels and advertising styles.

The entire Bioshock universe is totally engrossing. I can't wait for Infinite.

That Songbird will be singing a different tune after I get through with him >)

I absolutely loved the ads and propaganda in BioShock. I definitely prefer the art deco style, but this is excellent too. I can't wait for this game.

Oh wow. That is a nice pick of a name for that thing. It only makes it all the more terrifying. :D

God I love *blank*shock aesthetics, I cannot wait for this game!

one thing to expect from a bioshock game, very good atmosphere. This will do it nicely

I love in-game progaganda posters. One of my favorite things from fallout.

I have a feeling that the "Bucking Bronco" vigour is going to let you calm down enemies and they become neutral toward you (unless otherwise agitated)

I also fail to understand how the timeline of this game can work -- how can plasmid-like things exist in 1912 if in Bioshock it says they were invented in 1940's, and even then only by cramming together pretty much every scientist of note coupled with an incredible fluke discovery regarding the stem cells of sea slugs.
How the hell could plasmids be achieved in 1912??!!

I hope they still make some new tonics and weapons rather than just spitting the old ones out.

Puzzlenaut:
I also fail to understand how the timeline of this game can work -- how can plasmid-like things exist in 1912 if in Bioshock it says they were invented in 1940's, and even then only by cramming together pretty much every scientist of note coupled with an incredible fluke discovery regarding the stem cells of sea slugs.
How the hell could plasmids be achieved in 1912??!!

Welcome to cash-in sequels! Fuck logic, we've got got IP to hammer into the ground!

I have liked the Bioshock series so far, except for #2. I think that Irrational Games has this one down pat though and maybe they should've designed #2 as well. From what I've seen of the trailers it's looking like a good game, however only playing it will prove it to me for sure.

EDIT: Could one of the mods please delete this post? It's a duplicate.

Fronzel:

Puzzlenaut:
I also fail to understand how the timeline of this game can work -- how can plasmid-like things exist in 1912 if in Bioshock it says they were invented in 1940's, and even then only by cramming together pretty much every scientist of note coupled with an incredible fluke discovery regarding the stem cells of sea slugs.
How the hell could plasmids be achieved in 1912??!!

Welcome to cash-in sequels! Fuck logic, we've got got IP to hammer into the ground!

I don't really consider this to be a cash-in sequel -- it seems like its been made more on artistic merit and because they want to tell a story more than almost any other game out there, so I'll defend it on that level, but I'd much rather they come up with some new crazy bio-weapons instead of just renamed plasmids. The same with Big Daddies -- Handymen are the same in all the important ways, which sucks.

Fronzel:

Puzzlenaut:
I also fail to understand how the timeline of this game can work -- how can plasmid-like things exist in 1912 if in Bioshock it says they were invented in 1940's, and even then only by cramming together pretty much every scientist of note coupled with an incredible fluke discovery regarding the stem cells of sea slugs.
How the hell could plasmids be achieved in 1912??!!

Welcome to cash-in sequels! Fuck logic, we've got got IP to hammer into the ground!

Welcome to the internet, where without even looking at something, everyone's a critic! Seriously though, read up on it before trying to critique facets of it.

As for the game, it looks good, Bioshock 2 was surprisingly good given the best of the original's team had left. I can't wait to see how they've realised this universe, should be great.

Gralian:
I love irrational. Having been fortunate enough to play through System Shock 2, i have faith whatever they produce is going to be solid gold. Can't wait for Bioshock Infinite! Even if the sky feels far less oppressive and curious to set a dystopia in, unlike the sea or space. The problem is that it feels too... familiar. It's too close to what we know. After all, we've all been in airplanes before, so we've all been above the clouds. But none of us can really say we've been in a bathysphere to the bottom of the sea floor or in a space shuttle to the middle of a galaxy hundreds of years away. Not to mention the overly bright and cheerful aesthetic in Infinite going against the outright oppressive nature of Rapture's underwater paradise. Even the water itself was a metaphor for oppression, putting stress and weight on the pipes...
Though i do suffer from vertigo, and will be made uncomfortable as i play Infinite in the knowledge i will be perpetually high up with nothing to stop me falling. Regardless, i will play on, even if it starts to make me feel genuinely queasy. FOR SCIENCE!

Sorry, couldn't resist...

Good points, but can you or anyone else honestly say you have walked along the streets of a gigantic air-bourne metropolis?

Personally, i'm getting a good vibe from the new aesthetic choice they have going. The bright and vibrant (possibly a bit TOO vibrant) world that has been created seems to become a bit manic, and serves to aid the feeling of total strangeness when everyone seems to turn on you. It seems to remind me heavily of The isle of Mania from the shivering isles; a sense that the world that feels so positive and inviting can turn at any given moment. A world with a dream like quality, that threatens to become a nightmare at the drop of a hat.

The crushing dark of Rapture served its purpose, and for the setting and story it just went hand in hand. It certainly did its job of making me terrified of what lay IN the dark. But Bioshock infinite seems to be related by name only (as well as a few, or many, features etc), and what worked for Rapture may not work for Columbia. Columbia seems to warrant a new approach to making the world interesting.

Also, i think that the open space of the sky could be just as easily a metaphor for Columbia, than the depths of the ocean were for Rapture. Think about it, Change seems to be a key element to the world of Columbia. In the game-play demo there are at least two points where the physical world changes, as well as the sudden changes in behaviour displayed by the citizens. The mutton-chopped chaps badge changes, going from the american flag to something like the hammer and sickle of soviet russia or something similar, as well as the painting in the bar. What better environment to emphasise change, than one that can change dramatically
in the space of an hour?

OT: Genuinely one of the few games im looking forward to. Possibly the ONLY game. Loving the art work as well, really gives you a feel of the culture of Columbia.

Puzzlenaut:
I also fail to understand how the timeline of this game can work -- how can plasmid-like things exist in 1912 if in Bioshock it says they were invented in 1940's, and even then only by cramming together pretty much every scientist of note coupled with an incredible fluke discovery regarding the stem cells of sea slugs.
How the hell could plasmids be achieved in 1912??!!

We can only assume that they AREN'T plasmids, and that they work on different principles, and research into them started a long time BEFORE 1912.

Although, i do aggree, this is the part of infinite i'm not as hyped about, as it just seems to be more plasmids with a different label.

Jacob Haggarty:

Puzzlenaut:
I also fail to understand how the timeline of this game can work -- how can plasmid-like things exist in 1912 if in Bioshock it says they were invented in 1940's, and even then only by cramming together pretty much every scientist of note coupled with an incredible fluke discovery regarding the stem cells of sea slugs.
How the hell could plasmids be achieved in 1912??!!

We can only assume that they AREN'T plasmids, and that they work on different principles, and research into them started a long time BEFORE 1912.

Although, i do aggree, this is the part of infinite i'm not as hyped about, as it just seems to be more plasmids with a different label.

But from the gameplay we've seen there is seemingly no real difference at all besides the method of ingestion -- you drink Vigors as tonics instead of injecting them. Which is less cool to begin with.

And research on plasmids (at least in the Bioshock 1 universe), didn't start until at least 1949, when Adam was discovered.

imageAh, so nice to see them tap into "If you've done nothing wrong you've got nothing to hide/fear." The rat-faced bombmaker's looking better all the time, even without the Lovecraftian monstrosity to compare him against.

It's like a peek at a Tea-Party America!
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