Incipe Escapisti Imperium Romanum Quaesitis!

Incipe Escapisti Imperium Romanum Quaesitis!

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Challenge the might of Rome with our quiz!

To use an overused phrase, "All roads lead to Rome." And, in many ways, it's true - not literally, but figuratively. Roman culture has influenced our own in a fundamental way, and it's often a subject drawn upon to captivate us - Caesar's Legion from Fallout: New Vegas being a recent example. How much, though, do you know about one of the most influential civilizations in human history, the Roman Empire?

As always, you'll have as long as you like to take the quiz, and can retake it until you get that 100%, but your cumulative time will affect your position on the leaderboard.

(Take the quiz.)

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Emperor Greatus JTus got a 6/10. He demands the questions he missed be crucified.

I majored in Ancient History and still only got 8/10. I am shamed. I can never show my face in educated society again. I will now go live in a cave and meditate upon my human frailties for a century or so.

EmeraldGreen:
I majored in Ancient History and still only got 8/10. I am shamed. I can never show my face in educated society again. I will now go live in a cave and meditate upon my human frailties for a century or so.

Which ones did you miss? The coin, and the real names of the emperors?

At least, those were the ones that made me think twice.

I loved this quiz, first time through I missed the question about Roman coinage as I'd only heard about the Denarius and Sestertius. If anyone is interested in Roman history I recommend a podcast called "The History of Rome". It's great, the guy who does it is very engaging and explains things in layman's terms and also ties many common themes and instances back together. Google it and you'll find it.

Boo-ya. #1 with a bullet. Or, to be lesss anachronistic, with a sagitta. Looks like all those Latin lessons weren't wasted, after all.

The great MacNille got 7/10. Not bad.

90%, pretty good for someone who dropped Latin. I mainly owe it thanks to reading stories as a child though.

8/10. I'm pleased with that. But I think everyone will agree with me when I say:

Romanes eunt domus!

That out of the way, I only scored a 6/10. This is lies!

Huh, so being out of Latin for four years DOESN'T obliterate all my knowledge of the history of Rome. I guess having 100 or so extra credit questions per test really does drill in some knowledge. Many thanks, Mr. D!

9/10 isn't too shabby, especially as I skipped over most of my Ancient Roman stuff in my degree to focus on the Ancient Greeks. Think it's because I prefer literature and pots to military and politics.

Miss-clicked one answer and got 9/10 on the first try. So I did it again to get 100%. Awesome quiz!

Kargathia:

EmeraldGreen:
I majored in Ancient History and still only got 8/10. I am shamed. I can never show my face in educated society again. I will now go live in a cave and meditate upon my human frailties for a century or so.

Which ones did you miss? The coin, and the real names of the emperors?

At least, those were the ones that made me think twice.

The coin question was one of the ones I got wrong. The other one was the one about Pompeii. (Scandalous! I studied Pompeii!) The real names of the emperors wasn't too hard for me. I had to think about it for a moment, but I have a pretty good memory for names, so I didn't take long to work out which one was fake.

EmeraldGreen:

Kargathia:

EmeraldGreen:
I majored in Ancient History and still only got 8/10. I am shamed. I can never show my face in educated society again. I will now go live in a cave and meditate upon my human frailties for a century or so.

Which ones did you miss? The coin, and the real names of the emperors?

At least, those were the ones that made me think twice.

The coin question was one of the ones I got wrong. The other one was the one about Pompeii. (Scandalous! I studied Pompeii!) The real names of the emperors wasn't too hard for me. I had to think about it for a moment, but I have a pretty good memory for names, so I didn't take long to work out which one was fake.

I just threw a guess on the names, going by that I knew two of them, and that of the two remaining choices Pertinax was too obvious.

Did they find any fruit remnants in Pompeii though? Figured that banana's really would've been to fragile to stay intact until the lava cooled. Again, little more than a toss-up between the hotel and the banana's.

Kargathia:

EmeraldGreen:

Kargathia:

Which ones did you miss? The coin, and the real names of the emperors?

At least, those were the ones that made me think twice.

The coin question was one of the ones I got wrong. The other one was the one about Pompeii. (Scandalous! I studied Pompeii!) The real names of the emperors wasn't too hard for me. I had to think about it for a moment, but I have a pretty good memory for names, so I didn't take long to work out which one was fake.

I just threw a guess on the names, going by that I knew two of them, and that of the two remaining choices Pertinax was too obvious.

Did they find any fruit remnants in Pompeii though? Figured that banana's really would've been to fragile to stay intact until the lava cooled. Again, little more than a toss-up between the hotel and the banana's.

I don't know about fruit, but they did find intact eggs in Pompeii. (I remember this fact fondly because when my baby sisters had just learnt to read, they read a beginner-readers book about Pompeii together and both came running in great excitement to tell me all about it. Awwwww.)

Most of the damage in Pompeii was caused by falling ash and debris, so while the upper stories of houses often collapsed, the lower levels - and their contents - are remarkably well preserved. In Herculaneum, on the other hand, most of the damage was caused by pyroclastic flows, so the lower levels of houses were destroyed but the upper levels were preserved. In the upper story of one house at Herculaneum archaeologists found a charred but completely intact baby's cradle. (Which subsequently disappeared. If the person who stole it is reading this, give it back, you jerk.)

EmeraldGreen:

Kargathia:

EmeraldGreen:

The coin question was one of the ones I got wrong. The other one was the one about Pompeii. (Scandalous! I studied Pompeii!) The real names of the emperors wasn't too hard for me. I had to think about it for a moment, but I have a pretty good memory for names, so I didn't take long to work out which one was fake.

I just threw a guess on the names, going by that I knew two of them, and that of the two remaining choices Pertinax was too obvious.

Did they find any fruit remnants in Pompeii though? Figured that banana's really would've been to fragile to stay intact until the lava cooled. Again, little more than a toss-up between the hotel and the banana's.

I don't know about fruit, but they did find intact eggs in Pompeii. (I remember this fact fondly because when my baby sisters had just learnt to read, they read a beginner-readers book about Pompeii together and both came running in great excitement to tell me all about it. Awwwww.)

Most of the damage in Pompeii was caused by falling ash and debris, so while the upper stories of houses often collapsed, the lower levels - and their contents - are remarkably well preserved. In Herculaneum, on the other hand, most of the damage was caused by pyroclastic flows, so the lower levels of houses were destroyed but the upper levels were preserved. In the upper story of one house at Herculaneum archaeologists found a charred but completely intact baby's cradle. (Which subsequently disappeared. If the person who stole it is reading this, give it back, you jerk.)

Never knew about the eggs. And even though I know it wasn't all that hot I'm getting mental images of some very hard-boiled eggs here.

The question, however, referred to a garden with fruit. Generally I'd make the assumption that that'd be outside, and thus unprotected from bits and pieces falling from the sky.

Kargathia:

EmeraldGreen:

Kargathia:

I just threw a guess on the names, going by that I knew two of them, and that of the two remaining choices Pertinax was too obvious.

Did they find any fruit remnants in Pompeii though? Figured that banana's really would've been to fragile to stay intact until the lava cooled. Again, little more than a toss-up between the hotel and the banana's.

I don't know about fruit, but they did find intact eggs in Pompeii. (I remember this fact fondly because when my baby sisters had just learnt to read, they read a beginner-readers book about Pompeii together and both came running in great excitement to tell me all about it. Awwwww.)

Most of the damage in Pompeii was caused by falling ash and debris, so while the upper stories of houses often collapsed, the lower levels - and their contents - are remarkably well preserved. In Herculaneum, on the other hand, most of the damage was caused by pyroclastic flows, so the lower levels of houses were destroyed but the upper levels were preserved. In the upper story of one house at Herculaneum archaeologists found a charred but completely intact baby's cradle. (Which subsequently disappeared. If the person who stole it is reading this, give it back, you jerk.)

Never knew about the eggs. And even though I know it wasn't all that hot I'm getting mental images of some very hard-boiled eggs here.

The question, however, referred to a garden with fruit. Generally I'd make the assumption that that'd be outside, and thus unprotected from bits and pieces falling from the sky.

They probably were very hard-boiled... Apparently, in both Pompeii and Herculaneum, the heat from the pyroclastic flows was high enough to kill people who were sheltered from direct contact with the flows, so more than hot enough to boil an egg.

This has been a very slow-moving conversation, so I've just about forgotten what the questions were! Agreed that it doesn't seem likely there'd be much left of an outdoor garden.

 

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