Paleontologist Discovers "Giant Kraken Lair"

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Could Davy Jones be real to? >.>

Jokes aside this is quite awesome, if this is true, i wonder other Myths were actually real.

image

Heh, the Captcha says's it'll be in Europe xD

DasDestroyer:
RELEASE THE KR-
Oh. Ninja'd, of course.
Well then I for one welcome our new Kraken ove-
WHAT? Ninja'd there too?
-_-

dam ninja'd being ninja'd
well nothing can cheer me up now

RT-Medic-with-shotgun:
Good. Now lets find an underwater cave with 500 ships laid to waste in its belly and the remains of a kraken in their midst.

Scorched_Cascade:
I know I'm not the only one who thought this when reading the news title:

Fucking love that song.

well this cheered me up immensly

Where did they find those bones then? 'Cause if we want to be picky about our mythology up here in the north (and i know i for one do) then we won't accept the americans fucking up even more of it.

First you took our gods and turned them into flamboyant knights and now you wanna take our sea monsters too? I won't have it!

As for the story itself i guess we'll just have to wait and see how it develops, but i doubt we'll be hearing any more about this anytime soon

I just hope they don't find anything that eats Krakens...

Damn nature you scary.

considering the size of the things it would be hunting it makes sense they would be large enough to kill one which by todays standard would make them damn huge. considering the intelligence and problem solving skills of a modern species. while unlikely that it created a self portrait its also not impossible

H.P.Lovecraft:
The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents. We live on a placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas of infinity, and it was not meant that we should voyage far.

Well, I'm happy... not that suprised... but happy nonetheless...

Oh what great Cthulhu-vid so far @Scorched_Cascad
let me add another one:

nikki191:
considering the size of the things it would be hunting it makes sense they would be large enough to kill one which by todays standard would make them damn huge. considering the intelligence and problem solving skills of a modern species. while unlikely that it created a self portrait its also not impossible

I'm not exactly sure what your trying to say, but it sounds like your implying that larger size and high intelligence are directly related in cephalopod species. I've never heard of this being true. It certainly isn't true for squids and cuttlefish, and without substantial proof you can't claim that it's true for an ancient octopus either. This entire theory makes a lot of assumptions and has almost no evidence to back it up. Even if you had some kind of evidence that these octopuses existed you'd be hard pressed to prove how intelligent it was let alone that it made self-portraits.

So, what the upshot of this press release is is that during the Mesozoic period, known for it's megafauna and megaflora, paleontologists now believe there was a version of a creature we know today, but much bigger. Wow science, thanks for pointing that out to me. :P

blindthrall:
To which I would say you have an underdeveloped sense of bullshit.

To which I would say, you are at the top of the list.

Versuvius:

GonzoGamer:

Versuvius:

Giant deep sea cephalapods have huge amounts of ammonia in their flesh. They taste like a bottle of stale piss.

The Japanese restaurant by my office only sells the finest stale piss and ammonia infused flesh.

You have a japanese restraunt that sells colossal squid? I find that hard to believe.

Me too but that's what they say it is.
Really I think it's just old boot marinated in cat-pee... but they do it the best.

Kalezian:

shameduser:
This is relevant.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/EverythingsSquishierWithCephalopods

Like Rick Rolling except your trapped all day.

oh no, another tv tropes link, how will I ever escape it?

....with THIS!

http://theglen.livejournal.com/16735.html

You're terrible. Now I have to reread the entire thing. At least TV Tropes only traps you for a day at most.

OT: The article seems like real science trying to get attention by sounding more exciting than it is. The whole self-portrait thing was probably coincidental, like sitting in the sand leaving a "self-portrait" of you. The octopus probably just grabbed the remains of its prey and placed them around itself.

That being said, it's cool that we can say Kraken in relation to science.

Aprilgold:

*snipped*

Is that a real movie? WHERE CAN I FIND IT!

Netflix has it on streaming!

Giant kraken? As opposed to an ordinary-size one?

Zachary Amaranth:
He studied under Dr Daniel Jackson.

To be fair in that universe Dr. Jackson was right...

Jabberwock xeno:

Related: http://arstechnica.com/science/news/2011/10/the-giant-prehistoric-squid-that-ate-common-sense.ars

to the people who keep linking this; Awwww, how cute. he thinks only scientific relevancy should dictate what stories are run on the news. And investigative reporting collected from several sources, my my what a novel idea. That the news shouldn't be facilitators of hype. oh, he is just precious.

Listen we once had journalistic integrity, it used to matter. But frankly news doesn't do great in the ratings and by god the channels need viewers to stay there and watch it. So they are going to report a giant F-ing squid. Sorry that the game, 90% percent of americans want there to be a giant squid so maybe the fantasy of our economic, social and political structures actually working might be true too. Or at least it will distract away from those failings for a little while. Is there much evidence? not really. Is this guy a crackpot, most probably. but reporting a crazy guy has a crazy theory with more holes than camp greenlake that'll be debunked soon isn't as attention grabbing as "They found a real life kraken!"
/rant

OT; i think the part about self portrait is farfetched. However a giant octopus? it's not entirely crazy, everything else went supersized back then why not cephalopods? as the article states they're boneless so it'll be hard to prove. can't say yes or no on this, it weird, it's crazy, so if it's not true, not surprised. if it is proven true, awesome.

Hmmm... I read that expecting more scientists talking out of their arses, but that's actual evidence (as far as I'm concerned)!

Andy Chalk:
Some of you guys have a seriously under-developed sense of fun.

IT'S A GODDAMN KRAKEN!

It's fun, but that doesn't make it good science. The researchers are leaping to some pretty big conclusions based on what I would be charitably describing as weak evidence.

I mean, the argument boils down to this: There is an unusual pile of bones of Triassic aquatic reptiles, and we know modern octopuses arrange rocks, therefore it's a giant squid.

It just isn't a good argument. You could pretty much fill in any other tangentially related fact in the second sentence and come out with a new conclusion.

There is an unusual pile of bones of Triassic aquatic reptiles, and we know that sometimes areas with water dry up, therefore the creatures were killed by some sort of climate shift.

As a bonus, my argument doesn't involve gargantuan artistic squid (we've no evidence of that level of intelligence in squid, only octopi anyways) that left absolutely no traces of its existence whatsoever besides its artwork. The more outlandish the claim, the better the evidence has to be if you want scientists to take it seriously, and this is a pretty outlandish claim with only the flimsiest of evidence.

When they find a single hook or beak from this giant squid at the site, I'll start taking this story as anything but a huge joke.

Or to make a claim even more outlandish than theirs, "There is an unusual pile of bones of Triassic aquatic reptiles, and we know that Predators collect groups of animals together to use as birthing vessels for aliens, therefore Aliens Versus Predator was a documentary."

rayen020:

Zachary Amaranth:
He studied under Dr Daniel Jackson.

To be fair in that universe Dr. Jackson was right...

That universe? You mean Stargate wasn't a documentary?

Missing SHODAN:

As a bonus, my argument doesn't involve gargantuan artistic squid (we've no evidence of that level of intelligence in squid, only octopi anyways)

To be fair, the article isn't claiming that it was a giant squid but rather a giant octopus. I can see how you would get that confused though since even articles criticizing this are using squid and octopus interchangeably, even though they are two distinct organisms. Even then, I've never heard of an octopus being artistic either. They demonstrate exceptionally high levels of intelligence for invertebrates but I've never heard of them doing anything like drawing pictures. So in addition to being larger than any known octopus species this kraken would also have to be far more intelligent. It's pretty hard to swallow when we don't even have any parts of the creature to prove it existed.

[iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/5nq9kGFbfhc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen][/iframe]

Modern Octopus are incredibly intelligent animals, and the ones off the Oregon coast are already pretty damn big. I'm willing to believe that a few hundred million years ago a very large cousin existed. After all there have been huge examples of pretty much every other species of animal on earth in the fossil record, with most of them dying off in the great extinctions due to climate change, and lack of resources.

Considering the amount of time cephalopods have been on earth I'd actually be more surprised if there was never a giant example.

I really hope this Paleontologist finds a massive beak in the dirt.

Release the kraken! We have found his home, so we have no reason to keep him around anymore!

Normandyfoxtrot:

shadyh8er:

Andy Chalk:

"We think that this cephalopod in the Triassic was doing the same thing," McMenamin said. "It was either drowning them or breaking their necks."

I'm just gonna pretend this guy got misquoted. I mean, "drowning a shark"? Come on now.

OT: This is some exciting stuff. Nessie better watch out.

Technically it's suffocation not drowning precisely, but the majority of sharks do require constant water flow over their gills. As for the story I'm seeing little I would expect to pass peer review.

I think he was comparing the modern octopus killing a shark with a triassic one killing icthyosaurs. Icthyosaurs being air-breathing I think it makes more sense that way... But that was just how understood it.

shadyh8er:

Andy Chalk:

"We think that this cephalopod in the Triassic was doing the same thing," McMenamin said. "It was either drowning them or breaking their necks."

I'm just gonna pretend this guy got misquoted. I mean, "drowning a shark"? Come on now.

OT: This is some exciting stuff. Nessie better watch out.

you can easily drown a shark, or at least most of them, by keeping them from swimming. unlike boney fish most sharks lack the musculature to actively pump water over their gills, and so must always maintain forward movement, relative to the gills, to passively move water over them. if the flow of water is halted the gills will extract the oxygen from the water surrounding them, but with no way to expel the deoxygenated water and introduce fresh oxygen rich water the shark will suffocate.
Although i guess technically "drowning" is impossible because sharks have no lungs to fill with water, so they cant drown in the medical sense...

newwiseman:
Modern Octopus are incredibly intelligent animals, and the ones off the Oregon coast are already pretty damn big. I'm willing to believe that a few hundred million years ago a very large cousin existed. After all there have been huge examples of pretty much every other species of animal on earth in the fossil record, with most of them dying off in the great extinctions due to climate change, and lack of resources.

Considering the amount of time cephalopods have been on earth I'd actually be more surprised if there was never a giant example.

I really hope this Paleontologist finds a massive beak in the dirt.

Octopus are very intelligent, especially as far as invertebrates go, but I've still never heard of any octopus demonstrating artistic ability. They're very good at problem solving and are capable of using tools, but there's a big difference between that and having the vanity to make a self-portrait.

We will see what the owner of Virgin finds out when he explores the Mariana Trench soon... Hope he has enough cameras on board! Anyway, it's not a Kraken it's Orthoceren (or -ceras)...

Andy Chalk:

blindthrall:
To which I would say you have an underdeveloped sense of bullshit.

To which I would say, you are at the top of the list.

Look, I really want this to be true. The idea of anything that preyed on Shinosaur, let alone a giant octopus, is far beyond awesome. But if this thing did exist, do you know how hard it is that anybody would believe it now that this guy cried wolf? MOST scientists are loath to attach themselves to anything that could be wrong, especially something the scientific community has already laughed at. The paleontologist that announced this has taken the somewhat implausible yet interesting idea of an ancient enormous cephalopod and stripped it of any credibility with his self-portrait inanity. Very few animals can recognize their own image in a mirror, let alone reproduce it.

Missing SHODAN:
It's fun.

Precisely, and that's where the conversation stops. We're a gaming site that serves up a healthy side order of assorted other nerdy shit. If you're after hard, peer-reviewed science, maybe you should look elsewhere, because we're here to RELEASE THE KRAKEN OF FUN!

That's right, I said it.

DBLT4P:

shadyh8er:

Andy Chalk:

"We think that this cephalopod in the Triassic was doing the same thing," McMenamin said. "It was either drowning them or breaking their necks."

I'm just gonna pretend this guy got misquoted. I mean, "drowning a shark"? Come on now.

OT: This is some exciting stuff. Nessie better watch out.

you can easily drown a shark, or at least most of them, by keeping them from swimming. unlike boney fish most sharks lack the musculature to actively pump water over their gills, and so must always maintain forward movement, relative to the gills, to passively move water over them. if the flow of water is halted the gills will extract the oxygen from the water surrounding them, but with no way to expel the deoxygenated water and introduce fresh oxygen rich water the shark will suffocate.
Although i guess technically "drowning" is impossible because sharks have no lungs to fill with water, so they cant drown in the medical sense...

Yeah it's really underwater suffocation. But oh well, drowning is fine.

Ancient cephalapods!
Snapping necks and kraken skulls.

he was talking about this ancient kraken killing ichtyasaur(probably spelled it wrong)
wich was an aquatic reptile and had to breath air.

Thou whilt not speak with such buffoonery of his cyclopeon servants.

Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn

But seriously, if this thing did make self portraits, it might represent that we weren't the first intelligent life on the planet.

Andy Chalk:

Missing SHODAN:
It's fun.

because we're here to RELEASE THE KRAKEN OF FUN!

And screw Argos!

To be fair, don't we all kinda wish there was a Kraken section in Biology? I know as a kid, I sure would have loved that chapter.

oh my goodness!!!! CTHULU HAD HOUSE PETS!!!!!!
AND HE PROBABLY STILL DOES!!!!!
GAME OVER MAN!!!!! GAME OVER!!!!!

Normandyfoxtrot:

trophykiller:

Iron Lightning:
Wasn't the mythical Kraken just a giant squid?

Yes, but it's mythical, therefore, people refuse to believe it's exsistance for the sake of not wanting to believe it's exsistance. Perhaps at one point, giant squids were more aggressive, but natural selection made them more docile. Let's face it: even at sea, humans are hard prey, and the crew of the attacked ship would likely have caused all sorts of wounds before they died, right? It's risk vs. reward, and humans just aren't worth it.

My understanding of the little research of the two, the colossal squid is believed to be a much more aggressive and active hunter than the lighter, but longer giant squid.

As for the story I'm not sure you'd ever see either a Giant or Colossal Squid fighting a ship if their on the surface their dieing not hunting.

I haven't heard that, but it sounds. Interesting. As far as I knew, colossal squids were just rarer, larger versions of giant squids, but also had smaller eyes. I do know that a giant squid attacked 2 men in a boat in 1873. They cut it's tentacles off with a hatchet, though, which proves my "humans are mean-ass prey" theory.

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