Official Hunger Games Trailer Revealed

Official Hunger Games Trailer Revealed

Here's your first (real) trailer for The Hunger Games, though it's pretty light on the "kids killing kids" parts.

Back in September, Lionsgate gave movie audiences a glimpse of its upcoming film adaptation of The Hunger Games. A glimpse was all that was, too, since September's video seemed like it was more of a high-quality remake of the teaser trailer for Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves than anything else. Now, though, the real trailer has been released, and now we know why Jennifer Lawrence is running through the trees and killing off her fellow tweens: She wants to be the next Kim Kardashian.

Whoops, no! Sorry! Got that wrong! It turns out that Lawrence is playing Katniss Everdeen, a young woman living in the distopian nation of Panem (what used to be North America), which is divided into twelve different districts. Katniss volunteers to be a "Tribute" in her sister's place for the Hunger Games. The Games are a combination of government intimidation tactics towards the districts and reality television; basically, the Tributes are forced to murder each other for the public entertainment of upper class society.

The trailer looks pretty impressive, especially the bits where the decadent future society of Panem is featured. The trailer is also entirely a prologue, with no actual footage of the Hunger Games themselves. That said, the scenario certainly looks like it's being set up nicely.

Of course, what will be interesting to see is how the film actually depicts the element of, you know, kids murdering kids. The books are pretty graphic, since people get mutilated, riddled with arrows, stabbed, gutted, and -oh, yes- blown up. Odds are that Hollywood isn't going to want to show much of this in any amount of detail.

The Hunger Games will hit theaters on March 23rd, 2012.

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Reality TV is destroying our nation's youth!

Looks great but you'd think such a propaganda outlet would come-up with a more appealing title than Hunger Games.

Not bad. I'll have to check these books out, I've been procrastinating on buying them for quite some time, but they have grabbed my attention.

If it comes anywhere within spitting distance of Battle Royale's awesome, I'll be content.

American version of Battle Royale?

I read the book, thanks to Santa, and it was awesome so this might be worth my while.

I've never heard of the book nor the film, but watching this trailer seemed very familiar. I mean that in a bad way. Why are there people who specialize in movie trailers? This is why every single one of the big budgeted ones (not limited to Hollywood) looks as the next and, therefore, boring.

That was interesting, and looks semi-promising. I'm just curious to know how the movie is gonna handle all the kid on kid violence, and I have a feeling it's gonna get played down, a lot.

They'll make every character under the age of 16 not die in a horrible way, methinks.

However, that means we should just hope that the adaptation of the book has lots of above 15 year olds to slaughter! Yeah! XD

Fiz_The_Toaster:
That was interesting, and looks semi-promising. I'm just curious to know how the movie is gonna handle all the kid on kid violence, and I have a feeling it's gonna get played down, a lot.

They're all now arbitrarily 16 and/or 18 year old midgets.

Kopikatsu:

Fiz_The_Toaster:
That was interesting, and looks semi-promising. I'm just curious to know how the movie is gonna handle all the kid on kid violence, and I have a feeling it's gonna get played down, a lot.

They're all now arbitrarily 16 and/or 18 year old midgets.

Well there is one character that isn't, in the first book anyways, and she dies pretty violently, so I'm just a little curious.

I've seen the book in the stores and was slightly intrigued when I read the description on the dust cover. That was until I saw the recommendation from Stephanie Meyer. I want to avoid hyperbole here, but let's just say that I put the book down and haven't thought of picking it up again. Maybe it's a magnificent book, but now it just feels tainted.

Over the last 2 years I was a librarian at a school, so rant is ahead.

Not a huge fan of the books. They're an OK kids series (read them over winter break last year), but pretty bland and uninspiring. Pages upon pages (I'm not kidding) are spent describing the main character's clothes and hair, and she has umpteen outfit changes in the books, and the author has to explain every one down to the color of her nail polish. That left me pretty frustrated.

The "love story" is laughable, and didn't even make me go "aww" like you do in stories when the kids have their first kiss. I found Katniss to be pretty cardboard, and Jennifer Lawrence is a great actress (really, X-Men and Winter's Bone), and even she looks cardboard in the trailer. As for Peeta and .... Chris Hemsworth's little brother... Gale? They don't even act like teenagers.

When characters die (and, obviously, a lot die), I felt nothing. Not satisfaction, sadness, fear... the 'antagonists' (aside from "the system/the government") weren't characterized to be seen as bad... we were just told to assume that. Some of the other contestants were supposed to be bad guys just because of where they came from. Or how they looked.

When I started reading the book, I was reminded of the dozens of other dystopian teen books out there and this did not stand out. If you want a good teen one (teen books are pretty flimsy on story no matter what), try Birthmarked by Caragh M. O'Brien. I actually quite enjoyed it.

However... I could not tell all my students to go find and watch Battle Royale as some of the kids were 10-14. The older kids, though, I told them just to go watch the movie... when parents were not around.

Just rent Battle Royale and watch it again. I read through all 3 books in a couple days, they're pretty easy reads.

... I will rent it when it comes to Video on Demand for $6 though.

OK, done.

I wonder how they're going to do the character of Cato. And the Mutts. Holy shit, they were mindfuck up to 11.

Dirty Apple:
I've seen the book in the stores and was slightly intrigued when I read the description on the dust cover. That was until I saw the recommendation from Stephanie Meyer. I want to avoid hyperbole here, but let's just say that I put the book down and haven't thought of picking it up again. Maybe it's a magnificent book, but now it just feels tainted.

Not to seem like a jerk, but that's a really dumb reason not to try something new. So it's liked by someone you personally dislike. So what? Stephanie Meyer didn't write the book... she simply read it, liked it, commented on it, and weather or not she has any real writing ability, she has become a rather influential name, which is why they included her recommendation. But tainted? Really? So, if Justin Bieber decides that he likes Lord of the Flies, and his recommendation appears on the next big reprint of that book, will it become tainted?

"The Games are a combination of government intimidation tactics towards the districts and reality television; basically, the Tributes are forced to murder each other for the public entertainment of upper class society."

Battle Royale rip off much???

Kind of remind me of a human version of G Gundam (as in they have a single well two beings to repersent that group to battle it out with the other representative of the other groups to claim victory) cross with Battle Royale (involving kids to kill each other). While the trailer look tame but just like the film Immortal I would assume the film itself will be violent.

Ya know, that looks alright. I never really liked the books, but I think this movie will do them justice.

The lack of gruesome murder in this trailer bothers me. I really, really don't want this to turn into some kind of Twilight-like movie with focus going on the romances, because the point of the books was always the grimness. If they don't have some horrifyingly trippy sequence when Katniss gets stung by the wasps then I will be severely disappointed.

First off: The Hunger Games is shockingly good for a kids' book. Don't dismiss it because of its target demographic. Don't dismiss it because Stephanie Meyer liked it. Certainly don't dismiss it if you didn't like this trailer; I didn't either.

IndomitableSam:

When I started reading the book, I was reminded of the dozens of other dystopian teen books out there and this did not stand out. If you want a good teen one (teen books are pretty flimsy on story no matter what), try Birthmarked by Caragh M. O'Brien. I actually quite enjoyed it.

I've read my fair share of "teen" books, and I have to disagree - I enjoyed the Hunger Games series far more than any other teen story I've read in recent memory. The books themselves are incredibly dark and very well-written; they have a breakneck writing style that makes them enjoyable, and gives you a great sense that the story is unfolding before you, rather than just being recounted. Yes, they're hampered by some cheesy romance stuff (though even that is well done because of the way it's played out in the characters' minds), and yes, there are some bits where you can tell it's really not an adult's book, but those parts fade into the background very quickly when you get caught up in the story itself.

In any case, back on the trailer, it didn't really gel with my mental picture of the world, and I think I prefer the one I came up with. I'd always envisioned things as being a bit brighter, a bit more saccharine-sweet (especially in the Capitol); to be honest, I'd imagined most of the characters as looking more fragile, more childish and less "teen," even the protagonists. In general, it seemed too dark - not in tone of content, but in the filmography and stylistic choices. This is a dark story, but the darkness is from the character interaction and events, not a drab color palette. I'm also worried, like a lot of people, that it'll become a generic teen romance flick that happens to have action in it - but we'll see.

Liquid Paradox:

Dirty Apple:
I've seen the book in the stores and was slightly intrigued when I read the description on the dust cover. That was until I saw the recommendation from Stephanie Meyer. I want to avoid hyperbole here, but let's just say that I put the book down and haven't thought of picking it up again. Maybe it's a magnificent book, but now it just feels tainted.

Not to seem like a jerk, but that's a really dumb reason not to try something new. So it's liked by someone you personally dislike. So what? Stephanie Meyer didn't write the book... she simply read it, liked it, commented on it, and weather or not she has any real writing ability, she has become a rather influential name, which is why they included her recommendation. But tainted? Really? So, if Justin Bieber decides that he likes Lord of the Flies, and his recommendation appears on the next big reprint of that book, will it become tainted?

You don't come of as a jerk at all. Maybe a bit predictable, but not a jerk. I knew there would be a righteous "don't judge a book by its cover" comment. I guess what really turns me off is that there were dozens of authors they could have asked for recommendations, but they went with her. That means that they're targeting an audience that would also like her particular style and\or they were hoping to capitalize on her series' popularity. I guess if it was to be taken as serious dramatic science fiction and not blatant teen Mary Sue wish fulfilment, they should have chosen more wisely.

Kenjitsuka:
"The Games are a combination of government intimidation tactics towards the districts and reality television; basically, the Tributes are forced to murder each other for the public entertainment of upper class society."

Battle Royale rip off much???

No, this is more or less Battle Royale: The PG edition (Atleast, compared to the manga). At any rate, kind of saw this coming since the damned books were so popular...havn't read them as it did remind me a bit of battle Royale (Which disturbed even me) so yeah.

The first book was enjoyable enough, but the other two weren't all that great. The third book's ending felt really rushed and very poorly written, and time's flow was really disjointed when

Also, I really didn't like Katniss very much at all even though I should have, and I absolutely hated the forced romance between Katniss and Peta. It would have been so much better if Katniss had, you know, gone with someone she liked (sayyy, Gale), but I digress.

Wait, what were we talking about? The movie? Oh yeah. I'm wary of it since I've been let down so many times by book to film adaptations. Mostly with them straying too far from the source.

I'm too much of a gamer so all I saw was Half Life 1984: With Pre-Stormtroopers and Pre-Teens!
It's probably a novel "tee hee ^_^" idea to those that haven't been exposed to any sort of dystopian future society.

Yet some reason people tend to think romanticizing things such as how good 14-16 year olds can be at anything is worth time spent, but to consider that they can feel more than puppy love and anything near empathy at all would be an amazing accomplishment. I mean I know I had a pretty devil may care attitude when I was younger, as you age you just seem to care more about the world around you, including the people inside of it.

Now I'm not outing those that have had to grow up fast, but I'm sure each of you can think of more people at the teen age that didn't give two craps about others than did. Chances are this is easier to think up if you were a guy, but still this is speculation and stereotyping.

However why do people get tied up with such stories that feel kind of like taking an ad-lib page to the extremely cliche. Actually scratch that, teens can pretend to feel the depth of "something new" because in all honesty, chances are this is "something new". Something that brings up new depth to young readers that is culturally popular to them. I guess my concern is seeing how many grown adults, young adults (seemingly women, stereotyping again... sorry) that pick this up and give it complete love and devotion as if it was wrote by Danielle Steele herself. Chances are these women are the same ones that ate up Harry Potter, and possibly Twilight (BTW I'm awful at spelling this word) itself.

I suppose my rant comes from the misunderstanding of the difference between a mature reader and an immature reader, and is there has to honestly be a difference. (Sorry yes I believe there's such a thing as a mature gamer, my little brother (gamer, duh) laughed at the tomato soup can because it farted Campbell's into the pot while I got dinner ready for him. I did not. Some times there's too much to think about to laugh at farts, that's maturity.) Leaving me a bit cold in whether this is just going to be a boosted cash grab to make 5 or 6 movies (There's 4 books right?), all based on the sales that explode because apparently Mom (Or Dad, sorry again... I grew up around many cavemanish men.) and Daughter are at the same philosophical understanding. Hell family dynamics are fairly complicated now that I bring that up...

Alright once more.... I'm just pissed at Hollywood because they know they can just take the last best selling novel and puppet string it up (Insert young (cheap) actor here, use high lighter here, sniff high light... don't sniff highlighter) and create nothing but another golden goose. Stretch it out for more "events" than there were books. Rinse. Repeat.

Maybe this whole process doesn't feel authentic to me, hell you know regardless of what happened in the book, the whole thing will be toned down (America and children... Can't even off the blokes in gaming. The same medium that lets you pick what sexual act you want to receive, all while having a mysterious amount of weaponry stashed your bum. Then speaking of bums, hell run a few down blasting Micheal Jackson. AMERICA BABY!). This isn't some risky director trying to create an art-house real life copy of his favorite book, or well established one attempting to put together his favorite project that's been in the back of the mind. It just feels and smells like being stomped in the crotch repeatedly by commercialism. Even if you're watching it happen to someone else, it still is a little stomach turning.

Sorry that's my rant. Admittedly it's all over the place. I am perplexed by this just as I am perplexed by Madden, COD, honestly anything that I kinda moved on from, it's pretty silly to imagine that once I was sick of something, most others should be also. Yet I think readers should have the same amount of respect placed into turning their favorite works into silver screen interpretations, as I, as a gamer want mine. Honestly I don't see this as a very mature substance, feels too fluffy, yet for sure to succeed commercially. Again thanks for bearing with me on this one, I'm pretty much pounding my head against the brick wall called "The Internet" at this point, and maybe I amused you with my stamblings.

Also COD (Or insert any FPS with multiple sequels on the same platform, yet this idea applies best in COD's shoes) I'm not done with you! I'll be back to practice my typing on you! Not because of what you are, or anything to do with what happens. But about what could have been you bastards! KAAAAAHHHHHHNNNNNN!

By the way I normally early judge movies based on how much of it they can get away with taping in the forest... (It's cheaper.) ^_^

And yes to a point I'm trying to be satirical, possibly poorly. It sure is a fine line. *PHEW*

EDIT: I need to be slapped for each time I use just in a sentence -_-.

They're not perfect books by any means but I really enjoyed them which makes me very weary of this trailer...

Veritasiness:
First off: The Hunger Games is shockingly good for a kids' book. Don't dismiss it because of its target demographic. Don't dismiss it because Stephanie Meyer liked it. Certainly don't dismiss it if you didn't like this trailer; I didn't either.

IndomitableSam:

When I started reading the book, I was reminded of the dozens of other dystopian teen books out there and this did not stand out. If you want a good teen one (teen books are pretty flimsy on story no matter what), try Birthmarked by Caragh M. O'Brien. I actually quite enjoyed it.

I've read my fair share of "teen" books, and I have to disagree - I enjoyed the Hunger Games series far more than any other teen story I've read in recent memory. The books themselves are incredibly dark and very well-written; they have a breakneck writing style that makes them enjoyable, and gives you a great sense that the story is unfolding before you, rather than just being recounted. Yes, they're hampered by some cheesy romance stuff (though even that is well done because of the way it's played out in the characters' minds), and yes, there are some bits where you can tell it's really not an adult's book, but those parts fade into the background very quickly when you get caught up in the story itself.

In any case, back on the trailer, it didn't really gel with my mental picture of the world, and I think I prefer the one I came up with. I'd always envisioned things as being a bit brighter, a bit more saccharine-sweet (especially in the Capitol); to be honest, I'd imagined most of the characters as looking more fragile, more childish and less "teen," even the protagonists. In general, it seemed too dark - not in tone of content, but in the filmography and stylistic choices. This is a dark story, but the darkness is from the character interaction and events, not a drab color palette. I'm also worried, like a lot of people, that it'll become a generic teen romance flick that happens to have action in it - but we'll see.

I was quite surprised by the books myself. I was hesitant, but by the first book's end, so glad that I decided to buy them all (before Borders went under).

A lot of young adult books try to be edgy and dark, but the Hunger Games stood out to me for some reason. It wasn't overdone in the emotional aspects and actually presented a dystopian future that wasn't plagued with a certain air of "trying too hard" to attract an audience on dystopia alone. There was actually more to it than "the future sucks, boo hoo," and I liked the change of pace that ended with blood being spilled more often than tears. Boo f-ing hoo inded.

I'll be interested to see how the violence plays out because that part really caught my attention regarding the books. It might be "YA," but it was certainly gruesome! :D

soren7550:
The first book was enjoyable enough, but the other two weren't all that great. The third book's ending felt really rushed and very poorly written, and time's flow was really disjointed when

Also, I really didn't like Katniss very much at all even though I should have, and I absolutely hated the forced romance between Katniss and Peta. It would have been so much better if Katniss had, you know, gone with someone she liked (sayyy, Gale), but I digress.

Wait, what were we talking about? The movie? Oh yeah. I'm wary of it since I've been let down so many times by book to film adaptations. Mostly with them straying too far from the source.

All good points! Especially that forced romance bit. I'm a standard-fare guy that doesn't give much of a care about those typical aspects in stories when there's action to be had, but it was grinding my nerves throughout the series. What worried me the most for the film adaption was when I heard who was playing Peta (Hutcherson or something?) and I honestly can't stand him in a majority of the films he's ever been in. Now we'll likely have three times him. Dammit.

You're right on the money about that book-to-film issue, though. Some parts of the Hunger Games series are pretty damn gory, and anything less is going to feel like an obvious attempt to garner a younger audience. Never mind the fact there is everything else to be considered like small details, skipped plot points, character exposition being skimped, ect.

I just hope it's more on the Harry Potter end of the spectrum rather than that one with the Greek Gods camp (I forget the name, but it had the son of Posiedon, satyr, plotline that's completely different from the book, that one).

About 6 years ago this studio was trying to adapt an American remake of Battle Royale. I wonder if this is what they ended up having to settle on.

SelectivelyEvil13:

You're right on the money about that book-to-film issue, though. Some parts of the Hunger Games series are pretty damn gory, and anything less is going to feel like an obvious attempt to garner a younger audience. Never mind the fact there is everything else to be considered like small details, skipped plot points, character exposition being skimped, ect.

I just hope it's more on the Harry Potter end of the spectrum rather than that one with the Greek Gods camp (I forget the name, but it had the son of Posiedon, satyr, plotline that's completely different from the book, that one).

Percy Jackson and the Olympians. Plot line completely different from the book? Goddamnit, ANOTHER reason not to watch it now. I dropped it quite literally within 5 seconds of the pool scene, cause the implications just broke any semblance of plot twist. I hate movies like that. And I loved the bleeding books, too. And then they go and ruin it.

The only exception to that type of movie is HTTYD, cause I'm not quite sure how you could've made a good movie by following the book....

But, I digress. Hunger Games will most likely be like Percy Jackson, not HP. HP actually had likeable characters. At least for a while. HG, on the other hand, has a lot of angsty teens. Angsty for good reason, yes, but angsty nonetheless. And sweet jesus, is Katniss naive. Seriously, it was painful to see how completely naive she was. She seemed to refuse to believe that people should die in war. The word "casualties" didn't seem to compute with her.

The forced romance is precisely that, and it was horrible. I wouldn't even call it romance, more like Stockholm syndrome, or something similar.

I'm guessing the movie will be very similar to katniss, it won't be able to withstand death. It'll imply it, but I doubt anybody will truly die onscreen. And I would love to see the endwar scene

and how they handle such blatant killing.

*sigh* Oh, hollywood. When will you ever grow up, and realize that the younger audience has already seen it all anyway?

Averant:

Percy Jackson and the Olympians. Plot line completely different from the book? Goddamnit, ANOTHER reason not to watch it now. I dropped it quite literally within 5 seconds of the pool scene, cause the implications just broke any semblance of plot twist. I hate movies like that. And I loved the bleeding books, too. And then they go and ruin it.

The only exception to that type of movie is HTTYD, cause I'm not quite sure how you could've made a good movie by following the book....

But, I digress. Hunger Games will most likely be like Percy Jackson, not HP. HP actually had likeable characters. At least for a while. HG, on the other hand, has a lot of angsty teens. Angsty for good reason, yes, but angsty nonetheless. And sweet jesus, is Katniss naive. Seriously, it was painful to see how completely naive she was. She seemed to refuse to believe that people should die in war. The word "casualties" didn't seem to compute with her.

The forced romance is precisely that, and it was horrible. I wouldn't even call it romance, more like Stockholm syndrome, or something similar.

I'm guessing the movie will be very similar to katniss, it won't be able to withstand death. It'll imply it, but I doubt anybody will truly die onscreen. And I would love to see the endwar scene

and how they handle such blatant killing.

The Percy Jackson books already were set up to have an amazing film transition because the plot was balanced with plenty of action, mythology, excitement. They even had Pierce Brosnan as Chiron, Uma Thurman as Medusa, and just an overall good supporting cast. ... and Hollywood made it into a 1980's fetch quest. It screwed up the whole story so badly - especially with Luke - that I don't know how they could have ever thought that a sequel would be feasible.

Cirque du Freak was a movie that I enjoyed enough read the book, and then the next, and then the whole (massive) series. The difference was night and day (no vampire pun intended), especially with the book's graphic nature that would definitely warrant an R rating. The movie was "based" off the first three novels, if you get all of your plots from the comments section of cliffnotes, sparknotes, and a fan site. That happened because they had to cut down the books plots, remove characters (let alone characterization for those that remained), and made it PG-13.

That is the type of mess that I earnestly hope that not only the Hunger Games avoids, but hell, any book series that could transition to film. And it should be mentioned that the rival/villain in Cirque was the same kid who's Peta in the Hunger Games trailer/movie. Your Stockholm syndrome analogy is perfect for how I feel about 90 or more minutes that is going to likely play a heavy hand on the emotional card. HP did it, particularly in HP 6 with all of the romance crap that droned out any actual plot, and it will be even more cloyingly awful given HG's plot that actually has romance as more than a footnote. All that angst will be multiplied by a thousand for film audiences, and quite frankly that is the last thing we need in this world after Twilight.

Just an additional thought that occurred to me is that, as you mention, Katniss has a lot of naivety regarding war and death. Imagine all of that angsty drama and fade to slow-motion then switch back to fast present time, mid-battle emotional crisis, guilt, inopportune moment of sympathy-that-gets-people-killed potential... now I'm more worried. Let's hope that the movie has some restraint, just some when it comes to angst.

The part of me that enjoyed the books is still excited, but on the whole I'm still wary after so many past failures that had Harry Potter movie ambitions and failed to get even a direct-to-DVD second chance.

Averant:
*sigh* Oh, hollywood. When will you ever grow up, and realize that the younger audience has already seen it all anyway?

A lot of the blame belongs to the institution behind it all. Why do we always see so many toned down PG-13 movies? Because R movies are a 100% no-go for anyone underage. That turns into less sales, so movie studios can tone down material to attain the wider audience and better profits. The King's Speech released a "special version" that was PG-13 just for that reason under the guise that everyone should see this film!

It mirrors the video game conundrum of AO (Adults Only) video games. We can't [i]also have NC-17 or AO games because they're [i]taboo - despite the fact that today's R film isn't as shocking as it was to audiences in the past, including the increased gratuity. A new ratings bracket would help alleviate the whole mess since there isn't any buffer between [R-rated Inception, King's Speech, ect.] and [R-rated Human Centipede, Saw, SEX SCENE!!!!, ect], but overall the ratings boards seem like a fickle and easily-manipulated bunch, making the whole thing a bit of a racket. Some restrictions make sense, but like with M rated games, there is a line where you kinda go "eh" because by today's standards it's moderate compared to its fellows in the same rating. As a last tangent, sex becomes problematic as far as R ratings go and would thus become a trouble if, say, R rated movies were not so restrictive of audiences (like PG-13 movies) because here in the U.S. there is a very messed up taboo over sex that varies so much (watch any reality tv show) that I don't think anyone can figure out.

 

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