Nintendo Refuses to Fix Mario Kart 7 Exploit

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Nintendo Refuses to Fix Mario Kart 7 Exploit

Repairing a glitch that allows cheaters to continually beat honest players online would be "unfair."

A spokesperson for Nintendo has announced that the well-known Maka Wuhu track glitch will not be fixed. Online players are currently able to jump their kart off the track into a large lake at a specific point in the race, allowing the ever-helpful Lakitu towing service to erroneously transport them to the other side. The distance gained is nearly half the track, giving the cheater an advantage nearly impossible to overcome by players either ignorant of the glitch or unwilling to abuse it.

"We are aware that it is possible to navigate a certain part of the track in Wuhu Island in a way that allows a large part of the course to be bypassed," said Nintendo spokesman Buddy Roemer. "There are no plans to update the game to remove this shortcut as doing so would create an unfair advantage for the users of the original release of the game. Rest assured your comments have been added to our records for Mario Kart 7."

Admittedly, this is a difficult problem to address while patching remains impossible. On the one hand, they could fix the problem, assuring that only the current cheaters have the advantage at their disposal. On the other, they could ignore the problem, allowing more and more players access to the exploit, forcing others to embrace the glitch in order to remain competitive on the track. What do you think, Escapists? Did Nintendo make the right decision?

Source: Eurogamer

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Pretty lazy on Nintendo's part. If patching newer versions gives an unfair advantage to owners of the original release, why can't they patch those games too?

Remember kids. It's not a glitch. It's a "feature."

Sabrestar:
I'm assuming they "can't" because it's a cartridge game, and fixing it would actually require making new cartridges? Thus only owners of the rev.B carts would have the exploit fixed, while rev.A owners could still exploit away.

I don't think there's a way they can resolve this as long as they stick ham-fistedly to cartridge-based game delivery.

I suppose that makes sense. It'll stay a feature after all.

Patch in an invisible wall. There, I fixed it.

RaNDM G:
Pretty lazy on Nintendo's part. I don't see how fixing this would give players an unfair advantage.

Remember kids. It's not a glitch. It's a "feature."

I'm assuming they "can't" because it's a cartridge game, and fixing it would actually require making new cartridges? Thus only owners of the rev.B carts would have the exploit fixed, while rev.A owners could still exploit away.

I don't think there's a way they can resolve this as long as they stick ham-fistedly to cartridge-based game delivery.

Why can't they patch it? Can someone explain to me why DLC is possible but patching is not?

And the millions of people who defended Skyrim will now come to the charge of damning Nintendo in 3...2...1...

This does suck. There probably could be a way to fix this, but it'd involve something like the channel for Skyward Sword or something like that, and it'd pretty much be up to the people exploiting the game whether or not they'd use it.

A fix to the game is entirely possible. A way to put that fix into every copy of the game is not.

Vault Citizen:
Why can't they patch it? Can someone explain to me why DLC is possible but patching is not?

DLC is new content, delivered electronically. If the game is designed for it, it has hooks which allow DLC to be integrated into the game in a defined manner.

The track data is coming from a cartridge, and it's unlikely they built in any hooks to allow external programs to access that track data directly -- especially to make changes to it, because these are the exact sort of things that cheaters will use.

So that means a patch would somehow have to crack into the memory space of the game once it's loaded, and make alterations to the track. Cracking into used memory space is simply not something you want to be doing. Ideally, it's not even possible, so I can understand why Nintendo doesn't want to spend resources essentially proving there's a hole in their software security.

OT: I think they did the right thing. So long as they widely publicize the cheat information, it simply becomes the new track route, and doing it in such a way as to minimize your time taking it becomes part of the skill-set of that track.

If it can't be patched, then they should keep it as it is. It would just punish newer buyers of the game as it would be impossible for them to win on the map.

Is there a particular reason why cartridges are still individual games instead of removable hard drives with the games delivered wirelessly over the cell phone network? Aka, why does Nintendo want to profit share with retailers, when their device is nearly designed to bypass them already (ala Apple's App Store)?

I'd say they made the right choice. Their only option patch wise would be to introduce a Rev.B cartridge which would give owners of a Rev.A Cartridge an unfair advantage that Rev.B owners cannot do. Worse still, the track information will not match up which could prevent different versions from playing against one another. By refusing to patch it, the only seperation lies in the ability to use the exploit which can be resolved by practice.

It's the right choice. It would be unfair as hell to watch other people teleporting half track and being unable to do absolutely anything about it. If the glitch is available to everyone, stops being an unfair advantage and makes it even. It does sucks, but the mistake is already done, and making a bigger one won't solve the oldest.

Why don't they remove this track from on-line play. Is on-line play not centralised in any way? OR is it you can play with other users in a local way with just two or three DS's, but without internet. Otherwise this is a reason most don't use cartridges any more.

"Rest assured your comments have been added to our records for Mario Kart 7"
What does that even mean? The N-guy writing that probably was looking outside the window instead of the screen.

Right after writing it he threw the comments in the recycling bin, then he used that glitch online to pwn some unaware or honest "noobs"... :\

ph0b0s123:
Why don't they remove this track from on-line play. Is on-line play not centralised in any way? OR is it you can play with other users in a local way with just two or three DS's, but without internet. Otherwise this is a reason most don't use cartridges any more.

Its not so much a reason not to use cartridges anymore, as it is a reason to never allow Nintendo to handle online if they aren't planning on doing anything more after release. Which is why I very much doubt the intelligence of Square putting an MMO on the Wii consoles.

Hey they invented the blue tortoise shell for a reason.

i don't see why the couldn't patch it in a DLC pack or something, but this seems fine, at least its fair to every one

DVS BSTrD:
Hey they invented the blue tortoise shell for a reason.

hehehe, yeah, and this XD

Given the circumstances, yes, Nintendo made the right decision: at least right now everyone has the possibility of using that exploit. Think of it as a shortcut. Many online racing games have those kind of shortcuts in a narrow window in some of their tracks!

Now, if you ask me if Nintendo should have designed a new handheld console that doesn't allow for developers to patch all the existing copies of a game, then I would say no, that's where Nintendo dropped the ball! Even if the game is in a catridge, the ability to download a patch should be there, just like in all other gaming consoles from other brands.

Sabrestar:
I'm assuming they "can't" because it's a cartridge game, and fixing it would actually require making new cartridges? Thus only owners of the rev.B carts would have the exploit fixed, while rev.A owners could still exploit away.

I don't think there's a way they can resolve this as long as they stick ham-fistedly to cartridge-based game delivery.

I'm sorry to say this, but you're assuming wrong. You see, just as RaNDM G said, that's pretty lazy over Nintendo's part, on the Wii, if they screwed up, they had to replace entire discs or you had to send them your save file to get it fixed.

The 3DS allows for an easier update process, more akin to what the 360 and PS3 users are used to and as far as I know, they do have the capabilities of patching any game at any given time and in my opinion, this is just lazy and stupid.

It would be unfair to not allow cheaters to cheat? I...wha...I have no words for this. Seriously what is Nintendo smoking? I want some.

Azuaron:
Is there a particular reason why cartridges are still individual games instead of removable hard drives with the games delivered wirelessly over the cell phone network? Aka, why does Nintendo want to profit share with retailers, when their device is nearly designed to bypass them already (ala Apple's App Store)?

Because Nintendo seems to have something against building proper online functionality into their products. When they do include online features they're usually so limited by bullshit security measures like the friend code that they've inadvertently made the online features pointless or unusable in spontaneous play to anyone who doesn't live in a large metropolitan area. (IE Japan where a DS is just as common as the average iPhone)

Par for the course.

Track glitches have been in all the Mario Kart games, patching them out just wouldn't be right.

Besides, it's got the Nintendo seal of approval now, so it's not cheating anymore!

fix-the-spade:
Par for the course.

Track glitches have been in all the Mario Kart games, patching them out just wouldn't be right.

Besides, it's got the Nintendo seal of approval now, so it's not cheating anymore!

Yes, pretty much this. There have been plenty of glitches that allow shortcuts in Mario Kart games and many of them take quite a lot of skill to utilize. I always thought Nintendo left some of them in deliberately as discovering how to do them is part of mario karts charm.

Stormz:
It would be unfair to not allow cheaters to cheat? I...wha...I have no words for this. Seriously what is Nintendo smoking? I want some.

The thing is, with the way cartridges and ROMs work, they simply can't patch the track for those who already bought the game. So patching the game now would only work with any unsold future copies. Thus future buyers will still have to play against old buyers that can cheat. In this case it's better to let everyone cheat, so that it becomes "fair", than let a select group of people continue cheating while the others are left at disadvantage.

Blah blah blah whine whine whine. I consider finding shortcuts PART of the Mario Kart experience. Hell, Mario Kart 64 had several designated shortcuts as well as a few unintentionally exploitable shortcuts that were also approved and even ADVERTISED IN NINTENDO POWER. There's a reason Rainbow Road on the N64 is one of the most memorable tracks.

It's not like the computer players are going to use the exploit so it's only the multiplayer mode that's affected (mind that's half the reason you play a racing game at all), but these exploits are always high-risk, high-reward situations. I say if you're willing to risk taking the shortcut and succeed, you deserve to use it.

Eh, I can see this being annoying for some, but I understand Nintendo's rational by not doing anything. It WOULD be borderline impossible to fix this for EVERY single game, and then not only would there be cheaters, but there would be cheaters with no possible way to balance the cheating.

By leaving it in as it is, ANYONE can exploit it. So, in a way, it's sort of just another route shortcut. At tournament-level play, all the pros would be exploiting this anyways, so I don't think it's THAT big of a deal.

SupahGamuh:

Sabrestar:
I'm assuming they "can't" because it's a cartridge game, and fixing it would actually require making new cartridges? Thus only owners of the rev.B carts would have the exploit fixed, while rev.A owners could still exploit away.

I don't think there's a way they can resolve this as long as they stick ham-fistedly to cartridge-based game delivery.

I'm sorry to say this, but you're assuming wrong. You see, just as RaNDM G said, that's pretty lazy over Nintendo's part, on the Wii, if they screwed up, they had to replace entire discs or you had to send them your save file to get it fixed.

The 3DS allows for an easier update process, more akin to what the 360 and PS3 users are used to and as far as I know, they do have the capabilities of patching any game at any given time and in my opinion, this is just lazy and stupid.

I did assume, because I don't have a 3DS, so I don't know what procedures they may or may not have at their disposal. No offence taken. Thanks for giving me more info!

If they have that sort of patching ability and choose not to use it, then they can go rot.

Mr. Omega:
And the millions of people who defended Skyrim will now come to the charge of damning Nintendo in 3...2...1...

Well aren't you smug.

There is a difference between buggy single player games and buggy multi-player games. Another big difference is that Bethesda can and do patch their games. Nintendo however, refuses to get with the times and have a decent online network and this cripples their ability to patch and deliver DLC. Was it Skyward Sword they had to do that stupid fucking "channel" thing to fix a glitch of some sort? People would be more willing to defend them if they weren't using tech from around the time of the Sega Dreamcast.

Mr. Omega:
And the millions of people who defended Skyrim will now come to the charge of damning Nintendo in 3...2...1...

What does Skyrim have anything to do with this?
I love Skyrim as much as the next guy, i also hate the fact its a broken mess as much as the next guy (for example i hadnt been able to play it for the past 4 days without it crashing within 3 seconds of loadup).. but how is this anything like Skyrim?
At least Bethesda are putting patches out TRYING to fix their game... Nintendo are just being lazy.

KeyMaster45:

Azuaron:
Is there a particular reason why cartridges are still individual games instead of removable hard drives with the games delivered wirelessly over the cell phone network? Aka, why does Nintendo want to profit share with retailers, when their device is nearly designed to bypass them already (ala Apple's App Store)?

Because Nintendo seems to have something against building proper online functionality into their products. When they do include online features they're usually so limited by bullshit security measures like the friend code that they've inadvertently made the online features pointless or unusable in spontaneous play to anyone who doesn't live in a large metropolitan area. (IE Japan where a DS is just as common as the average iPhone)

So when the article says "online", what's meant is "local peer-to-peer wireless network"?

Azuaron:

KeyMaster45:

Azuaron:
Is there a particular reason why cartridges are still individual games instead of removable hard drives with the games delivered wirelessly over the cell phone network? Aka, why does Nintendo want to profit share with retailers, when their device is nearly designed to bypass them already (ala Apple's App Store)?

Because Nintendo seems to have something against building proper online functionality into their products. When they do include online features they're usually so limited by bullshit security measures like the friend code that they've inadvertently made the online features pointless or unusable in spontaneous play to anyone who doesn't live in a large metropolitan area. (IE Japan where a DS is just as common as the average iPhone)

So when the article says "online", what's meant is "local peer-to-peer wireless network"?

In a nut shell, yeah. I can't speak about Mario Kart 7 for certain since I don't own it, but the typical MO of "online" for a DS game is either local multiplayer between people in the same room or that contrived bullshit they call friend codes that only lets you play with people over the internet so long as you've got their super special code. I think they've got a similar system in place with the Wii which is equally frustrating when it comes to online multiplayer.

Kwil:

Vault Citizen:
Why can't they patch it? Can someone explain to me why DLC is possible but patching is not?

DLC is new content, delivered electronically. If the game is designed for it, it has hooks which allow DLC to be integrated into the game in a defined manner.

The track data is coming from a cartridge, and it's unlikely they built in any hooks to allow external programs to access that track data directly -- especially to make changes to it, because these are the exact sort of things that cheaters will use.

So that means a patch would somehow have to crack into the memory space of the game once it's loaded, and make alterations to the track. Cracking into used memory space is simply not something you want to be doing. Ideally, it's not even possible, so I can understand why Nintendo doesn't want to spend resources essentially proving there's a hole in their software security.

OT: I think they did the right thing. So long as they widely publicize the cheat information, it simply becomes the new track route, and doing it in such a way as to minimize your time taking it becomes part of the skill-set of that track.

Thank you :) as I have shown in other topics I have no techinical knowledge whatsoever.

Fuck no they shouldn't fix it.

Exploiting glitches has always been a part of Mario Kart. It's tradition!

There has always been track exploits, or at least as far back as Kart64. It's just part of the gameplay.

NLS:

Stormz:
It would be unfair to not allow cheaters to cheat? I...wha...I have no words for this. Seriously what is Nintendo smoking? I want some.

The thing is, with the way cartridges and ROMs work, they simply can't patch the track for those who already bought the game. So patching the game now would only work with any unsold future copies. Thus future buyers will still have to play against old buyers that can cheat. In this case it's better to let everyone cheat, so that it becomes "fair", than let a select group of people continue cheating while the others are left at disadvantage.

Oh okay that makes more since, thanks for clarifying that.

Still not as bad as the Metroid glitch that made it so you either had to restart the game or buy an SD card, put your save file on it, send it to them, wait for them to fix it and send it back, and then start playing the game again. Nintendo really needs to learn that updates are an important technology that's been around for how long now? I guess this really just helps show how behind the curve they really are for some of the things we take for granted. Just imagine if Skyrim had been on the Wii. Well, besides the fact it'd have horrible graphics and 50% of the content would have to be cut out.

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