Fans Tear New Mass Effect Book to Shreds

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I just remembered that I pre ordered this book months ago. It's probably already shipped and will arrive at my doorstep in a few days.

Great, now I have to read it.

imnotparanoid:
These people have waaaaaay to much time on their hands.
And thats coming from someone who spent the last 4 hours making orogami seals.

Well, yes and no. Something like a video game tie-in novel is by definition aimed at hardcore fans rather than a casual demographic. As such someone doing the writing should understand and respect the material they are writing for, since their audience is exactly the kind of person who is going to react that way, this is who the product is directed at.

Ultimatly in organizing novels attached to established properties, you need editors who can act as oversight, and also to carefully prevent authors from changing things around to try and personalize the work and make it their own (so to speak). Basically the universe is the star of the story, the author is just someone given the honor of being allowed to play around there.

You also have to understand that fans are increasingly concerned over novels set in existing universes due to the massive damage done by novelists to long-standing properties in the past. D&D novels being one of those, where gradually you started seeing the guys writing the novels who managed to get a non-gaming audience, actually bending the game itself to their whims. While this was profitable for a while, you can sort of see the end results with the current state of the PnP RPG industry compared to days past. While it was not exclusively the cause, the novelists chased away a lot of the gamers given time, the gamers were the core audience, and as time went on you saw the fad for the novels reduce (but never disappear, it's still probably the most profitable aspect of what remains of the business, but itself a shadow of what it once was) and without the core audience that had been gradually eroded edition, after edition, and novel after novel, and increasing competition from things like CCGs and MMORPGs... well, we see what happened.

Perhaps a more apt comparison would be the "Expanded Universe" mess in Star Wars and how you had authors like Karin Prentiss (I think that's the name) entirely redefining Mandalorians and gradually infecting other novels to the point where it became a sort of slow poison that has lead to her name being reviled by a lot of fanboys, and if reports are to be believed a lot of people turning their back on the EU.

I won't even get into Star Trek, though admittedly being one of the first universes to have massive amounts of tie-in novels, to a non-written central property, it sort of gets a past since it represents the baseline other similar projects should have learned from.

There have been enough GOOD tie in novels, where you can see how it should be done, and it increasingly makes the stinkers REALLY stand out. Honestly I think a lot of it has to do with both the writers and the publishers being after an easy write and quick buck, which is why there are so few standards applied. It's okay if you wind up with someone who deeply understands and loves the universe and watches themselves, it's not okay if someone decides to say do a couple of playthroughs of a video game as their only research and squat and poop out a novel knowing that the editors themselves don't know or care enough to catch them. I mean the guy who wrote "Deception" has a credit for publishing a novel, doubtlessly got paid, and due to the "Mass Effect Name" it probably sold pretty well... so really he's already won and got his springboard to other writing, which is probably what he wanted.

That's my thoughts at any rate.

Those are some rather glaring errors. You'd almost think he wasn't even trying to understand the source material.

Was just about to start on this book....Well I still am, this and Asunder, really hope it's not too bad..

CardinalPiggles:

AstylahAthrys:
Dietz's novel was the weakest in the Halo series

FUCK! And I just bought that book too. God damn

Have to be a bit more careful next time.

I heard it's not the worst book but it's not as good as it had to stay true to the game in most parts.

I find it a bit silly that people are bringing up real life science into a fictional setting. I mean, biotics have eezo in their nervous system, therefore they can generate mass effect fields that they can detach from themselves and send on its merry way as a heat-seeking death ball. It doesn't have to be realistic, just consistent, which this book fails on on all accounts.

Lame.... I had already pre-ordered, and it already shipped.

.. Looks like I'll just have to shelve that one... Not sure I want to waste my time if it blatantly ruins the canon.

Shavon513:
There are so many fanfiction writers, who are level headed and write very well that Bioware could have hired (for probably less than this guy) and it would have sold more and made fans happy.

They tried hiring those people to write for Dragon Age 2. Say what you will about the game itself, but fans weren't made particularly happy.

Lear'sFool:

Daverson:

Agayek:
*snip*

Yeah, I covered that back in post 26. You'd need a segment with the mass of a few hundred micrograms travelling close to the speed of light.

Photons have a very small mass, which we can't really measure, but it's theorized to at most 10^-60 kg. (about 30 orders of magnitude less than an electron or neutrino, which in any mathematical model is statistically nothing.)

This is very nitpicky, but I just had to: Protons are the ones with mass. Both protons and neutrons have a mass of 1 AMU (Atomic Mass Units, or so I think I remember). Electrons are the ones that cannot really be measured; their so tiny compared to protons and neutrons. In fact, electrons are comparable to quarks, which make up protons and neutrons. I can't remember exactly what neutrinos are, but I'm getting something about them being related to taus (extremely tiny balls of energy created in sub-subatomic reactions between quarks and the like that last not even a nanosecond), and they fly through space, at least that's what I think I remember.

That's a very basic version of how things actually are. Electrons have a measurable mass (about 10^-30kg). Yet, the mass of a photon compared to an electron is even smaller than the mass of an electron compared to a proton. There's no scientifically accepted figure for the mass of a photon, the best we can do is guess the maximum possible mass they could have, given that certain physical laws (ie, Coulomb's law) are known to work.

Denamic:

Daverson:
realistically speaking, even if that were somehow travelling at the speed of light (ie, ignoring relativistic effects, to account for using the lowest likely mass of a grain of sand) the muzzle energy of such a weapon could be a few kilojoules, about the same as most rifles. (source)

SCIENCE!

Guns are not just about how much energy the projectile is moving with.
To actually make use of that energy, the projectile has to be able to transfer that energy to the target.
That's why people use hollow point rounds in weapons for use against meatbags.
Hollow point rounds basically go splat, transferring all of its energy into the target and shredding it from the inside.
An armour piercing round with the same amount of energy would just pierce the flesh and go out the other side, resulting in minimal damage.
A projectile the size of a grain of sand would have tremendous armour piercing capability, but it'd be terrible at causing any actual damage.
In fact, after a threshold depending on the size of the projectile, it'd actually start causing less damage with more energy, because it'd start piercing flesh so easily that very little energy is actually transmitted.
You'd just get perforated and highly uncomfortable rather than dead.

True, but also kinda irrelevant. Solid slug ("ball") ammunition (which relies solely on kinetic energy) is still widely used, and while it isn't as effective as hollowpoint, it's not exactly non-lethal, is it?

Re: Element Zero

My own personal interpretation was that this was it's non-scientific name, (ala "God Particle"). More fundamental laws are given lower numbers (Zeroth Law of Thermodynamics, Zeroth Law of Robotics, Zeroth Law of Space Combat), and so as a scientists joke Element Zero was so nick-named as it was more fundamental to our understanding than our knowledge of the chemical elements. It makes sense to me at least.

OT

Writers in an already established canon have a responsibility to ensure their work fits in. There are so many resources documenting the lore of the ME universe that the author and the people who green-lighted it have no excuse. It saddens me that such a well constructed universe is being diluted with this.

I used to love Bioware back in the days when the product that emerged was fleeting and myself all over, but now I feel like I have been created again, and my new friend is abandoning me because he can play at a speed I cannot, and Bioware knows this, and that is why they have changed since the time when I was a small fellow who cared only for his hot chocolate. Bioware have dropped themselves on this.

Daverson:
True, but also kinda irrelevant. Solid slug ("ball") ammunition (which relies solely on kinetic energy) is still widely used, and while it isn't as effective as hollowpoint, it's not exactly non-lethal, is it?

It's a compromise.
It's 'solid', as in not designed specifically to crumple, decreasing its flesh tearing capabilities.
But it's better at penetrating thin walls and armour.
Its somewhat less lethal nature is also more suitable for civilian use.
Cuz murder bad.

Anyway, it's still quite a lot larger and much more capable of transferring energy than a projectile the size of a grain of sand would be.
Imagine a steel rod that has a diameter of 1cm, and having it come down on your hand with enough force to pierce your hand.
Now imagine a steel needle with a diameter of .5mm, and having it come down on your hand with the same amount of force.
The needle would just penetrate your hand and leave it relatively undamaged whereas the 1cm rod would hurt you pretty bad.

How can this book be so bad if it were written by Drew Karpyshyn? I would expect it to be average at best but this is just ridiculous.

*sees who wrote the novel*

Oh. It was written by William C. Dietz. Now the poor quality makes sense.

SupahGamuh:
Even I'm pissed off by this book and I haven't read any of the Mass Effect books yet!, but I've read every single nook and cranny that the codex offers for both Mass Effects.

Why did I chose not to play ME3?...

Could you not get it on a console?

Daverson:
Erm, point 4, I don't think you can make assumptions of the "science" behind ME, considering their magical crystal are "Element Zero".

For those of us who apparently don't know what science is, elements in the periodic table are numbered by the number of protons they've got in their nucleus. So, Element 1 (Hydrogen) has a single proton in the nucleus, while element 13 (aluminium) has 13. Element 0 isn't something that's physically impossible, it's literally nothing! You can't have nothing as your magical crystals!

And it's not like it's just called "Element Zero", but it's something else entirely, they go out of their way to say that's exactly what it is! I'm pretty sure this is the first thing you learn in chemistry classes these days!

Besides, I thought the whole point of the guns in ME was that the projectiles where part of a solid ammunition core that was broken off in minuscule amounts (say, less than a nanogram), and accelerated to speeds close to the speed of light to cause an equivalent amount of destruction to a conventional firearm. Yeah, if you accelerate something like an apple to relativistic speeds, it's gonna blow up half a major city (hand-wavy physics here! don't correct me by saying it'll only blow up a few blocks =p ), but obviously at a microscopic level, there's no nearly as much destructive potential. (think about it, light travels at the speed of light, but each photon that hits the earth doesn't wipe out everything, does it?)

(In case you think I'm suddenly applauding their ability to write good sci-fi, I should point out this is blatantly plagiarized from Wh40k's shuriken weapons =p )

Element Zero is just a name given to the star-plasma infused metal that makes Mass Effect possible. It doesn't necessarily mean that it has no protons/neutrons.

So way to fail.

Okay, I've played ME1 and 2 and I am fairly interested in the lore, but I'm in no way an expert, but the first two of these facts I could have noticed off the top of my head.

Pirate attacks on a homeworld? that just sounds absurd for any race to be attacked by some bloody pirates on their homeworld, let alone the turians. I've not even read the wiki or anything, but I still know that the turian race is essentially the largest military force in the galaxy.
And Volus. Again, it's explicitly stated in the games that Volus can't live without their masks.

I'm just a casual fan and I know these things. I hate to imagine the heart-attack inducing rage that full on fans would have felt for this book.

Guns are not just about how much energy the projectile is moving with.
To actually make use of that energy, the projectile has to be able to transfer that energy to the target.
That's why people use hollow point rounds in weapons for use against meatbags.
Hollow point rounds basically go splat, transferring all of its energy into the target and shredding it from the inside.
An armour piercing round with the same amount of energy would just pierce the flesh and go out the other side, resulting in minimal damage.
A projectile the size of a grain of sand would have tremendous armour piercing capability, but it'd be terrible at causing any actual damage.
In fact, after a threshold depending on the size of the projectile, it'd actually start causing less damage with more energy, because it'd start piercing flesh so easily that very little energy is actually transmitted.
You'd just get perforated and highly uncomfortable rather than dead.

Except that anyone with basic knowledge of ME's lore knows that the sand-sized bullets fired from firearms in the game squash upon contact, transferring its energy straight into the target.

However, the worst part isn't just the mistakes: If you read the doc in question, it outlines an egregious downturn in character quality:

"Gillian's visit to Afterlife - Afterlife is the most popular bar on Omega and people wait hours to get in (Retribution, Mass Effect 2). In Deception, Gillian enters immediately and without any trouble from the bouncers. [Error: Lore]"

"Tantalus Drive Core on a batarian ship - Though the Tantalus Drive is referred to as "standard," it was actually a highly secret, experimental drive core first used on the SSV Normandy. It's doubtful that a dated batarian ship would have one. Additionally, such a core is by itself equivalent to the cost of an entire cruiser class ship. [Error: Technology]" (This ship eventually ends up in Gillian's hands)

"Gillian gets new biotic implants in a few hours-long (?) operation in a non-medical facility - Biotic implants interface directly with the nervous system and the operation to replace them is considered extremely dangerous, to the point that even biotics who have crippling side-effects from their implants are usually unwilling to run the risk of brain damage and other permanent, deleterious effects. [Error: Technology]"

"Characters use advanced biotic powers with no prior training - After getting her "implants" changed Gillian is able to "reave" and biotically charge, abilities that, before, were advanced and mostly exclusive to Shepard. [Error: Techonlogy]"

"Gillian "sensing" that a pair of asari strangers were capable of biotics - Biotic ability cannot be sensed in this way, and as all asari are natural biotics, it is not something she needed to do anyway. [Error: Technology]"

There are several others, all of which point to Gillian being turned into a Mary Sue through incompetent writing.

Note: All of these are quoted directly from the doc, with entry numbers removed for clarity's sake. (i.e. it would be confusing to have #12 in front of #2)

*facepalm*

Ordered my copy from Book Depository last week, probably on its way now. At I'm forewarned... maybe trying to spot all the mistakes for myself will make it more amusing somehow :P

imnotparanoid:

And thats coming from someone who spent the last 4 hours making orogami seals.

Props for that, by the by.

OT: Wow, those are some mighty big mistakes, especially from a veteran science fiction writer. Especially the "hand cannon o' relativistic doom" thing.

Man that is such an embarrisingly epic fail!
I bet BioWare saw this file and just dropped their jaws on the floor.
I wonder how do the writers feel after this insult to their work of creating the ME universe.

I'm debating on reading it for the story, even if it is shitty, I have to know what happens, or just reading summaries online. I've already seen a few spoilers, so I'm thinking the latter... Plus, I don't want to support this novel with my money.

Daverson:
Erm, point 4, I don't think you can make assumptions of the "science" behind ME, considering their magical crystal are "Element Zero".

For those of us who apparently don't know what science is, elements in the periodic table are numbered by the number of protons they've got in their nucleus. So, Element 1 (Hydrogen) has a single proton in the nucleus, while element 13 (aluminium) has 13. Element 0 isn't something that's physically impossible, it's literally nothing! You can't have nothing as your magical crystals!

And it's not like it's just called "Element Zero", but it's something else entirely, they go out of their way to say that's exactly what it is! I'm pretty sure this is the first thing you learn in chemistry classes these days!

Besides, I thought the whole point of the guns in ME was that the projectiles where part of a solid ammunition core that was broken off in minuscule amounts (say, less than a nanogram), and accelerated to speeds close to the speed of light to cause an equivalent amount of destruction to a conventional firearm. Yeah, if you accelerate something like an apple to relativistic speeds, it's gonna blow up half a major city (hand-wavy physics here! don't correct me by saying it'll only blow up a few blocks =p ), but obviously at a microscopic level, there's no nearly as much destructive potential. (think about it, light travels at the speed of light, but each photon that hits the earth doesn't wipe out everything, does it?)

(In case you think I'm suddenly applauding their ability to write good sci-fi, I should point out this is blatantly plagiarized from Wh40k's shuriken weapons =p )

I always sorta interpreted element zero to be some sort of psudo-higgs boson, the particle that gives atoms mass, and they are some how able to fiddle with that. I realise that doesn't explain the mining of it or anything, but it makes some scientific sense

Daverson:
According to some website I found on google, the mass of a grain of sand is anywhere from a few tens of a microgram to a milligram, (so I was way off, sue me, still in the same order of magnitude of orders of magnitude, that's close enough for hand wavy science), realistically speaking, even if that were somehow travelling at the speed of light (ie, ignoring relativistic effects, to account for using the lowest likely mass of a grain of sand) the muzzle energy of such a weapon could be a few kilojoules, about the same as most rifles. (source)

SCIENCE!

Let's do a little test.
A 5.56mm NATO round has muzzle energy of about 1700 joules, so that's what we're trying to achieve. A grain of sand has the mass of 1 milligram. If we use the formula for kinetic energy, the velocity required for a 1 mg grain to impact with the energy of a rifle round is 58,310 m/s. The speed of light is 299,792,458 m/s, which means that the grain reaches 0.00019c.

If a grain of sand is launched at light-speed, as you said, it would have a kinetic energy of 44,937,758,936 joules, which the in-game weapons obviously don't. Guess the weapons aren't that relativistic after all!

Bara_no_Hime:

Foxtrotk72:
these guys are idiots i reckon i dont really care if there's plot holes in ME i guess some people want to share there frustration with the world. I haven't read any ME novels so i feel sorry for the author who wrote this he/she tried there best to do it but the fans are bitching seems like it to me, i love Mass Effect i really do even though im mocking the fans but to be honest there just whining to me

SonOfVoorhees:
I guess no one checks it. I read the list and there are some really obvious mistakes although others are a bit nit picky. especially when dealing with a sci-fi novel. Thing is, even the creators are not the best people to check the book before being published, only a die hard fan is qualified....same as with Star Trek and Star Wars. Need nerds to proof read it and ensure its correct.

aftohsix:
Nitpicking is nitpicking. A large number of complaints about Mass Effect 2 boil down to the same issue. 'Why is the lore inconsistent.'

Good god and I thought I was a nerd...

Mimsofthedawg:
the other two seem like nitpicking to me. I might read the rest when I get back to work... just wanted to say that, thus far, I don't have much faith that the fans themselves know much about the Lore.
Either way... nit picking.

Obviously you didn't read the full list. This book follows from the previous three, with returning characters. One of the returning characters died in the previous book... and no one seems surprised that he's there, unharmed, with no explanation. There is a video of another character's death that took place in the previous book - and the video portrays a death scene that doesn't even resemble the one written in the previous book.

Oh, and two of the returning characters were 12 years old in book 2. It is stated that three years have passed since the events of book 2. Except that it is also stated that five years have passed since then. And both characters are now 18 years old (6 years older). The author apparently couldn't handle basic math.

There are nit-picks, and there are "you didn't read the novel you're writing the sequel to" - this falls into the later category.

And if the OP didn't convey this - well, I think the OP was trying to choose less novel-related items, and also the items that the OP found most amusing. If you want to see what we're upset about, read the list (see the OP for link).

pft, eff that, I'm gonna read the whole book! Then we'll see.

I have my hesitantion to trust fanboy rage because it's quite easy for them to take things out of context (especially when the evidence produced thus far, such as the Turian military bit, is weak at best).

Still, I understand where you're coming from, and it's unfortunate that this would happen.

The Mass Effect franchise is consistently inconsistent.

Stormwaltz:
Hey folks. A quick note: "element zero" is a human nickname. It should not be interpreted to mean eezo is a literal element. In the in-game codex, it's referred to with the deliberately vague term "material."

When subjected to an electrical current, the rare material dubbed element zero, or "eezo", emits a dark energy field that raises or lowers the mass of all objects within it. This "mass effect" is used in countless ways, from generating artificial gravity to manufacturing high-strength construction materials. It is most prominently used to enable faster-than-light space travel.

Eezo is generated when solid matter, such as a planet, is affected by the energy of a star going supernova. The material is common in the asteroid debris that orbit neutron stars and pulsars. These are dangerous places to mine, requiring extensive use of robotics, telepresence, and shielding to survive the incredible radiation from the dead star... (snip)

It is "unobtainium" (i.e., made-up BS). But it's most emphatically NOT an element. I helped develop the tech base and wrote all the ME1 codex entries, so I can speak with some authority on that. :)

Mimsofthedawg:
It's actually mentioned that most of the Turian fleet was destroyed in the Battle of the Citadel by the Geth...

This is inaccurate. Most of the Citadel Fleet was destroyed at the Battle of the Citadel, but Council peacekeeping forces are stationed throughout the galaxy. Most significantly, none of the 37 turian dreadnoughts were at the Citadel (and they had completed two more by the time of ME2). Canonically, the Council lost 20 turian cruisers - this is stated in the al-Jilani interview from ME2 - and possibly (depending on player choice) the Destiny Ascension.

wait wait wait wait... you helped develop all the codex entries in ME1?

WHAT?!

and you've been a member since 2003?

WAS THE ESCAPIST EVEN ALIVE BACK THEN?!

ok ok ok, so what's your take on this then? Did the author really screw up that bad?

And I could have SWORN that I heard a reference in ME2 that the Turian fleet was caught off guard by the attack and was destroyed... but then, maybe this was a reference to ships patrolling the Citadel... After all (correct me if I'm wrong), isn't the Turian Fleet given responsibility to protect the Citadel?

This doesn't really answer the question (At least to me) as to why humans are the only major power to be in control over the galaxy in ME2 if you didn't save the Ascension... Weren't they in power because they were the only race capable of maintaining order? isn't that much said by anderson and the other humans?

hmmm.. ah well.

aashell13:

The_Darkness:

Daverson:
Element 0 isn't something that's physically impossible, it's literally nothing! You can't have nothing as your magical crystals!

Okay, can't quite believe I'm getting into this, but that isn't exactly right. The atomic number refers to an element's number of protons, not the total mass of the nucleus. So Element Zero would just be an atom with no protons (cf neutron stars). It still doesn't make perfect sense, but it's better than, well, nothing :)

On topic... GOOD GRIEF. I spend an indecent amount of time keeping track of Mass Effect canon in my head (particularly how things would be changed by what happened in my playthrough), and I'm also an amateur author. Something like this just hurts...

so it would be a just a neutron...

that's disappointing. let's interpret 'element zero' metaphorically and say they called it that because it's the foundation of galactic society.

Let's think of it from the writing perspective: Element Zero is magical sci-fi goo. Since this is hard sci-fi, everything has to make scientific sense with the conceit of said sci-fi goo.

anthony87:

SupahGamuh:
Even I'm pissed off by this book and I haven't read any of the Mass Effect books yet!, but I've read every single nook and cranny that the codex offers for both Mass Effects.

Why did I chose not to play ME3?...

Could you not get it on a console?

Trying to not sound fanboyish here, nope, I don't want to buy another console, I already had a 360, but as a long time PC gamer, I just couldn't see a single thing or benefit that couldn't be done better in my PC and I simply sold the console a few months later.

Economically speaking, in my country, console games are very expensive, a new game sells at roughly $78 US dollars, heck, that's exactly what Super Mario Galaxy 2 still costs. One of my main reasons of why I'm a PC gamer, it's because it's much more feasable, heck, if I wanted to, I'd pre-order Mass Effect 3 right now, because it seems that EA has different prices for my region and Mass Effect 3, in Origin's page and I'm not kidding, sells for roughly $38 US Dollars. And no, that's not like a pre-order discount we're used to see in Steam's page, that's exactly what every single game from EA costs in my region (through Origin), Battlefield 3, Crysis 2, both Dragon Ages, Dead Space 2, you name it.

If their games are so damn cheap in my region, why the heck I'm complaining about?, because I don't like Origin, simple as that.

element zero could be a lot of things, there are all kinds of matter that can exist without protons, which as stated above defines atomic number rather than the atoms mass, it could just be neutrons, or any other kind of exotic matter made up of the other baryons or mesons we know not that much about, calling it nothing is just plain wrong

AstylahAthrys:
Dietz's novel was the weakest in the Halo series...

"Weak" is an understatement.
His style was flat and dull, he couldn't set up a scene to save his life, and even for a game based off Halo, the dialogue was pathetic.
One of my friends had me read a Twilight book, and I can say without hesitation that I'd rather re-read a Twilight book rather than Dietz's book on Halo.

/rant

Seriously, how do you fail that hard?

William C. Dietz...yeah he wrote The Flood for the first bunch of Halo novels. Seemed a bit off with a few things (Master Chief's personality), but I'm not about to dig up little details and junk lol

So it turns out Biotics were just Saiyans all along, who'd a thunk it? I bet that makes training interesting.

"Teacher, I just can't seem to lift anything heavier than 2 kilos."
"Okay, off to the getting-nearly-beaten-to-death-so-you'll-become-stronger-room with you."
"Score! Level 3, here I come!"

So, so dumb.

Mimsofthedawg:

WMDogma:

10. Batarian pirates slave-raid on the turian homeworld of Palaven - while not impossible, this is incredibly unlikely due to the militaristic nature of turian society, one consequence of which is possession of one of the largest military fleets in the galaxy. And even if there had been a raid on Palaven, the turians would have likely responded with overwhelming military force. [Error: Lore]

It's actually mentioned that most of the Turian fleet was destroyed in the Battle of the Citadel by the Geth... soooo... this actually isn't wrong.

What? No it wasn't, they only lost 20 cruisers. They have almost twice as many dreadnoughts as that.

Leftnt Sharpe:
Let me introduce you to the Leftnt Sharpe Tie-in fiction rating scale, starting from worse to best:

-Author needs to be punched in the face (C.S Goto goes here).
-Tie-in bad (Dietz is about here).
-Tie in average (Karpyshan here).
-Tie-in good (Karen Traviss goes here? Also Sandy Mitchell).
-Dan Abnett (Pretty self-explanatory)

It should be noted that when comparing tie-in books to actual works of literature they should be moved down one category. For example a book that is 'tie-in good' is merely average by normal standards and Dan Abnett would be reduced from 'God Emperor of tie-in fiction mancrush level' to merely good.

Please feel free to rip apart my life's work.

This system should come in hand in the future.
But what do I get to do to Goto if his work is compared to literature.

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