Double Fine Adventure Kickstarter Breaks $2 Million

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Double Fine Adventure Kickstarter Breaks $2 Million

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Tim Schafer's Double Fine Adventure Kickstarter has now brought in more than five times its original target amount.

It's official: The Double Fine Adventure Kickstarter, which Tim Schafer figured would earn enough to cover the rent for a month or two, has now waved good-bye to the $2 million dollar mark. That's two million bucks spread across more than 60,000 backers, in less than two weeks, for a project that initially had a goal of $400,000.

While details about the forthcoming Double Fine Adventure are pretty much non-existent at this point [the game didn't even exist as anything more than a glint in Schafer's eye two weeks ago, after all], all that coin means more fun for everyone. The game will be developed for the PC, Mac, Linux, iOS and Android, be available in both Steam and DRM-free formats and be localized in French, Italian, German and Spanish.

Schafer's runaway success has also inspired other developers to try similar things. Brian Fargo of Interplay fame plans to launch a Kickstarter in March to help fund a Wasteland sequel, while Planescape: Torment mastermind Chris Avellone said he's thinking about giving it a go too.

The pace of funding has slowed somewhat, which is no surprise, but don't worry too much if you haven't yet had a chance to fling your money at the pile. There's still 22 days left on the clock, plenty of time to do your bit.

Permalink

SHUT UP AND TAKE MY... oh wait you did!

I truly hope this "Community commission" sort of funding doesn't end in some huge legal backfire. It'd be good to have an alternative to the Publisher-owned studio production system.

If it can work, then at least here we can see that the first step can work: Getting enthusiast backing.

This leaves me with just one question, where the hell are all these people when Double Fine actually releases a game?

Couldn't have happened to a nicer bunch of dudes.

Really? I mean really? Is this going to become a thing now? If i remember right, everyone on the internet blasted our very own escapist about that yatzee thing, and there ok with this? Wheres the line people?

--

Brad Shepard:
Really? I mean really? Is this going to become a thing now? If i remember right, everyone on the internet blasted our very own escapist about that yatzee thing, and there ok with this? Wheres the line people?

The line is Tim Schafer.

Triforceformer:

Brad Shepard:
Really? I mean really? Is this going to become a thing now? If i remember right, everyone on the internet blasted our very own escapist about that yatzee thing, and there ok with this? Wheres the line people?

The line is Tim Schafer.

Good point, Its still ridiculous, this is a COMPANY we are talking about here, e begging, god it just makes me mad...

Brad Shepard:

Triforceformer:

Brad Shepard:
Really? I mean really? Is this going to become a thing now? If i remember right, everyone on the internet blasted our very own escapist about that yatzee thing, and there ok with this? Wheres the line people?

The line is Tim Schafer.

Good point, Its still ridiculous, this is a COMPANY we are talking about here, e begging, god it just makes me mad...

You do realize this is partly a symbolic gesture, right? This is people voting with their money, saying "hey, we want to support developers! The publisher doesn't need to be involved."

Yeah, they've incorporated for the sake of having a name and being a legal entity, but that doesn't make them a faceless, money grubbing monster.

I'm curious as to how this Kickstarter thing works. Do the donators get anything from it (other than knowing they helped fund a project that might produce an excellent game or might not), or is it basically just a charity drive?

Atmos Duality:
I truly hope this "Community commission" sort of funding doesn't end in some huge legal backfire. It'd be good to have an alternative to the Publisher-owned studio production system.

If it can work, then at least here we can see that the first step can work: Getting enthusiast backing.

Where would the legal issue come from. If they don't fulfill their end of the contract then we should get our money back.

Erana:

Brad Shepard:

Triforceformer:

The line is Tim Schafer.

Good point, Its still ridiculous, this is a COMPANY we are talking about here, e begging, god it just makes me mad...

You do realize this is partly a symbolic gesture, right? This is people voting with their money, saying "hey, we want to support developers! The publisher doesn't need to be involved."

Yeah, they've incorporated for the sake of having a name and being a legal entity, but that doesn't make them a faceless, money grubbing monster.

I respect your Opinion Miss, but something just does not feel right about a big corporation doing this.

spectrenihlus:
Where would the legal issue come from. If they don't fulfill their end of the contract then we should get our money back.

If history has taught me anything, it's to never underestimate the power of lawyers in business.
So many things appear to be simple transactions on paper, and turn into months long-battles in court, sometimes over the simplest things.

Call me one to err on the side of caution, though I am hopeful this process will bear fruit.

Alar:
I'm curious as to how this Kickstarter thing works. Do the donators get anything from it (other than knowing they helped fund a project that might produce an excellent game or might not), or is it basically just a charity drive?

You are pretty much prepaying (well ahead of time) for a copy of the game, as well as access to a production video diary and betas.
Sure; The game is barely even on the planning stage, but these are people that are known to be able to deliver quality products.

You can donate larger sums and that will bag you some additional goodies, if you think they're worth it. It's all written out on the kickstarter page.

Final value: Somewhere between $2.5 and $3 million - higher if Tim adds new monetary incentives (a back catalog of Double Fine titles might well go over nicely).

Bravo.

maddawg IAJI:
This leaves me with just one question, where the hell are all these people when Double Fine actually releases a game?

Napping?

I've already tossed $30 into the project. I'm a big fan of both Tim Schafer and Ron Gilbert, so I can't wait to see where this goes.

Brad Shepard:
I respect your Opinion Miss, but something just does not feel right about a big corporation doing this.

Well it's a developer begging to be able to make something they want to make. This is someone saying, "yes I could make another generic game clone that someone will publish but I want to make a game that I'll feel proud of making." So many games get pushed to the side because publishers can't see how they'll make them money, which in turn slows down new creative ideas.

Hmm why do i get the feeling this is not going to end well

Andy Chalk:
While details about the forthcoming Double Fine Adventure are pretty much non-existent at this point [the game didn't even exist as anything more than a glint in Schafer's eye two weeks ago, after all], all that coin means more fun for everyone. The game will be developed for the PC, Mac, Linux, iOS and Android, be available in both Steam and DRM-free formats and be localized in French, Italian, German and Spanish.

Sarcasm, attempt at humour, misinformation or new information?

Genuinely asking, the last I heard/saw was that these things (extra OSs/localizations) depended on how much money was gathered. Now, you might assume that with the 2 million these things will happen, but that's not really legitimate information, just a guess.

OT: Go Schafer. Hope he makes something good out of it, the expectations will be high with this project being so successful.

dose this mean we can has maor nice things? o.o?

Brad Shepard:
I respect your Opinion Miss, but something just does not feel right about a big corporation doing this.

Not sure but I think I could fit most of the double fine team in my house and maybe use the carport for overflow. I got the idea they aren't that big.

Also it is a company that makes odd games for a niche market so I will back them. If this was Activision asking to kickstart Warfare Modern an FPS with modern shooting I would just laugh at it.

Kickstarter may work for "high risk" games the publishers won't touch. You know gotta sell those millions of copies and if everyone and their dog won't buy it they won't publish it.

Vrach:

Sarcasm, attempt at humour, misinformation or new information?

Genuinely asking, the last I heard/saw was that these things (extra OSs/localizations) depended on how much money was gathered.

I think the update was made at $800,000.

Why does my internt screw up today? grr bad internet...bad!

2fish:
I think the update was made at $800,000.

I saw the "oh look, loads of money, thanks, all extra cash is gonna go on stuff like this, this and this", but I never saw them actually saying what they're gonna do specifically and for sure, last I saw was a statement that basically read "don't worry, we're not gonna spend everything over the 400k mark on punch and pie".

Vrach:

2fish:
I think the update was made at $800,000.

I saw the "oh look, loads of money, thanks, all extra cash is gonna go on stuff like this, this and this", but I never saw them actually saying what they're gonna do specifically and for sure, last I saw was a statement that basically read "don't worry, we're not gonna spend everything over the 400k mark on punch and pie".

I have not see specifics such as the ipad 200 HD edition but they did say EFIGS and say they were looking into ios other devices. Probably can't say it 100% until they have ended the drive and started working. Why dedicate X dollars to ios when you have no idea how many dollars there will be total?

Radioactive Kitten:
I've already tossed $30 into the project. I'm a big fan of both Tim Schafer and Ron Gilbert, so I can't wait to see where this goes.

I love them too, but with that kind of time schedule (a few months) and budget, the only place it can go is a 2 and a half hour long, pretty entertaining, point and click adventure game, NOW ALSO WITH TOUCH FEATURES ON iOS! In my opinion, they should have used the kickstarter buzz to secure funding by a publisher on top of that, so they can make an actual game.

Brad Shepard:

Triforceformer:

Brad Shepard:
Really? I mean really? Is this going to become a thing now? If i remember right, everyone on the internet blasted our very own escapist about that yatzee thing, and there ok with this? Wheres the line people?

The line is Tim Schafer.

Good point, Its still ridiculous, this is a COMPANY we are talking about here, e begging, god it just makes me mad...

They are a game developer. Game developers do not always have the kind of money necessary to make a game by themselves. The fact that Double Fine is a company doesn't mean that they make billions of dollars annually, and race sailboats off the coast of Monaco every weekend. Developers often rely on publishers and other corporate investors for funding. Publishers obviously don't often want to bother greenlighting a game that takes a substantial risk. This is why many AAA titles are often first-person shooters or formulaic RPGs. They have been tested, and proven to sell. Innovative titles do come out every now and again, but it can be an uphill battle, unless the developer has proven time and again, like Valve for example, that pretty much everything they touch is a hit. Think of this kickstarter thing as a type of investing. Educated consumers are putting up their own money, with a risk, to get something made that they believe in. This is at the heart of what investment should be.

maddawg IAJI:
This leaves me with just one question, where the hell are all these people when Double Fine actually releases a game?

Raging that they only released it on Xbox and PS3. Well, at least this one'll be for PC too...

Carnagath:

Radioactive Kitten:
I've already tossed $30 into the project. I'm a big fan of both Tim Schafer and Ron Gilbert, so I can't wait to see where this goes.

I love them too, but with that kind of time schedule (a few months) and budget, the only place it can go is a 2 and a half hour long, pretty entertaining, point and click adventure game, NOW ALSO WITH TOUCH FEATURES ON iOS! In my opinion, they should have used the kickstarter buzz to secure funding by a publisher on top of that, so they can make an actual game.

I won't mind a short length if the writing is good and the puzzles are fun. I'm certainly not expecting a massive epic adventure considering they've scheduled it to release in October and it's priced at only $15.

Even with the help from Kickstarter funding, they'd probably still have a hard time getting a publisher. Double Fine has publisher issues even when what they're planning to make has plenty of potential for mass-market appeal, and this game is part of a genre that no publisher will dare to touch. Even with the buzz surrounding the project, publishers still likely see the genre as niche at best, and since it's not guaranteed to rake in tons of cash, they want nothing to do with it.

If nothing else, this is a grand opportunity to see (through a documentary!) Tim Schafer and Ron Gilbert working together again for the first time in ages, within a genre they helped pioneer, and without a publisher breathing down their necks to boot.

Brad Shepard:

Erana:

Brad Shepard:
Good point, Its still ridiculous, this is a COMPANY we are talking about here, e begging, god it just makes me mad...

You do realize this is partly a symbolic gesture, right? This is people voting with their money, saying "hey, we want to support developers! The publisher doesn't need to be involved."

Yeah, they've incorporated for the sake of having a name and being a legal entity, but that doesn't make them a faceless, money grubbing monster.

I respect your Opinion Miss, but something just does not feel right about a big corporation doing this.

To be fair in this case most people are just doing the 15$ to buy the game. It's not like Double Fine is a charity, and while you can give more the majority of people are basically buying the game up front, with the belief that the people behind it can make a good product.

If say DF was going bankrupt and was asking fans to pay off there debts for them that would be a different story entirely.

Vrach:

Andy Chalk:
While details about the forthcoming Double Fine Adventure are pretty much non-existent at this point [the game didn't even exist as anything more than a glint in Schafer's eye two weeks ago, after all], all that coin means more fun for everyone. The game will be developed for the PC, Mac, Linux, iOS and Android, be available in both Steam and DRM-free formats and be localized in French, Italian, German and Spanish.

Sarcasm, attempt at humour, misinformation or new information?

Genuinely asking, the last I heard/saw was that these things (extra OSs/localizations) depended on how much money was gathered. Now, you might assume that with the 2 million these things will happen, but that's not really legitimate information, just a guess.

OT: Go Schafer. Hope he makes something good out of it, the expectations will be high with this project being so successful.

Donators got an e-mail with a link to this video

I wonder how the big companies are thinking about "there is no money in thisandthat genre of games... Oh wait 2 Million $ in pre order money? hm we might be somewhat wrong"

Sure they shouldn't start making loads of old style games because the market wold dry up pretty quickly. But an idea is to do that silly thing say "listen to your customers" and produce at least some of the more wanted titles or kind of games and of course to go far and make them easily available and maybe even take in some input during development about what they should/n't do ....
You know like Double Fine is doing right now...

So checklist for making something someone might want (no guarantee though because people are weird)
1. What do people want.
2. Make what they want (of course with something they don't know they want ;-)
3. Set a decent price tag (60$ isn't decent, especially with the conversion rates I've seen 1$=!1€...)
4. Make it easily available without punishing your customer.
5. Correct errors in product (like bugs, annoying DRM etc....)
6. Profit?
7. Repeat?.....

There's going to be 5000+ people in the credits 'Thanks' list. :O

Brad Shepard:

Erana:

Brad Shepard:
Good point, Its still ridiculous, this is a COMPANY we are talking about here, e begging, god it just makes me mad...

You do realize this is partly a symbolic gesture, right? This is people voting with their money, saying "hey, we want to support developers! The publisher doesn't need to be involved."

Yeah, they've incorporated for the sake of having a name and being a legal entity, but that doesn't make them a faceless, money grubbing monster.

I respect your Opinion Miss, but something just does not feel right about a big corporation doing this.

Honestly, everyone I know who's given them money is "pre-ordering" the game, so to speak. The Yahtzee thing was just sending Yahtzee to... what was it, PAX? I can see where people view it differently. Since the basic gift for donating is getting a copy of the game for a price I would expect to pay for an adventure game like that ($15 is less than I paid for my Sam & Max game) it has a bit of a different feel to it.

There have already been 4 separate articles about this whole thing. Give it a rest already, or wait until it's done to report a total.

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