Artificially Intelligent Being Designs Videogame for Humans

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Artificially Intelligent Being Designs Videogame for Humans

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Creative AI (and real-world GLaDOS wannabe), Angelina, has designed a game about humans fleeing sentient robots who want to kill them. Nope. Not creepy or weird at all.

Writers such as Ray Kurzweil defined the so called "Singularity" as the moment in time when an artificial intelligence becomes powerful enough to design another intelligence that surpasses, and ultimately renders powerless, human intelligence. The new game Space Station Invaders, designed from scratch by a freaking computer, may not be enough to push mankind over the Singularity hump once and for all, but I do know one thing: We're a hell of a lot closer now that an artificially intelligent robot has personally developed a game in which other artificially intelligent robots try to hunt and kill human beings.

Now, before you try to arm yourselves with makeshift mobile EMPs and struggle to remember the correct pronunciation of "Klaatu barada nikto," perhaps a more detailed explanation is in order. A few years ago, mad scientist Michael Cook began work on what (who?) is now known as "Angelina," an artificial intelligence capable of working with a set of predetermined graphical and auditory assets, and assembling them into a fully functional game designed to offer human players a variety of customizable challenges and goals (as well as a terrifying glimpse at their bleak, looming future).

Angelina created the game using an extremely clever technique known as "cooperative co-evolution," which mimics biological evolution and development in organics. First, she designs the game's components or, in keeping with the evolutionary theme, "species." In the case of Space Station Invaders, these species included level designs and layout, enemy behavior (yes, that's artificial intelligence designing artificial intelligence), and a series of power-ups. Once multiple iterations of each species have been created and cataloged, Angelina chooses a representative of each from her database at random, creates a test game, then simulates a human attempting to escape the menacing deathtrap of killer robots that she has manically created to amuse herself.

Depending on how the simulated humans perform, Angelina then adjusts each species to compensate for both the good and the bad parts of the hypothetical player's experience. For example, a level in which the fleeing human must cross a stage filled with vengeful robotic assassins only to find a jetpack power-up, then return to a high platform near the beginning of the stage may be considered "fun" or "interesting," while the same level with the jetpack placed too high for the player to reach would be discarded. Angelina then mutates each species to accommodate the information she's gathered, then crossbreeds the mutants with each other to form optimal combinations.

If you'd like to risk the crystal ball of our impending doom, which is to say, see firsthand what it's like to play a game created almost entirely by an artificial intelligence, you can click here to fire it up in your browser. You may notice that the human you control can't die. Necessary exclusion to prohibit Angelina from accidentally creating an unplayable game, or clever mollifying maneuver meant to subconsciously lull our kind into a false sense of security while she begins remote work on her hyper-proficient murderbots? You be the judge.

While the possibility of a creation such as Angelina programming, say, the U.S. drone fleet to randomly attack civilizations while it watches for us to recognize and scale platforms of various heights and widths is unlikely, a somewhat similarly sinister scenario (though admittedly of a less bloody and terrifying variety) may already be in the works. "In theory," says Cook, whom Angelina may or may not already refer to as "God," "the Creator," or "the Old One," "there is nothing to stop an artist sitting down with Angelina, creating a game every 12 hours, and feeding that into the Apple App Store."

For now, Space Station Invaders has much to achieve before joining the ranks of Angry Birds, but based on its progress thus far, it's not a huge long shot to consider Cook's scheme someday paying off. But isn't the idea of humans profiting by sitting on our butts while machines do all our work what generally gets us into trouble with violently rebellious androids in the first place? Tread carefully, Cook, for the sake of us all.

Source: NewScientist

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Well, that's just awesome I say. I can't wait to see the day an AI species lives besides humans.

Oh christ. I'm getting to my vault.

Also, extremely cool. But terrifying. And this is from the guy who pretends to be Adam Jensen on twitter. I'm down with personal and social robotics. Once those bastards start to create, however, this becomes an entirely new ballgame.

Did i mention it was cool? Because seriously, mind blown.

there will be cake. and tests. for science!

Eh, im not too worried about AI's taking over the world.

Theyll do a better job at telling it what to do than any government ever could.

We are forming a consensus. Further input required.

I have this sudden craving for cake for some reason...

So what your saying is; this thing is playing god?

... How long till a cult is formed around it and it demands sacrifices?

Other then that, cool.

I for one welcome our new robot overlords, etc.

This is so awesome. I hope that Angelina improves and that it makes much better games.

Very cool news, and for the record I do not think that robots are nessicarly going to try and kill us all if they become intelligent. I tend to look at Asimov's writing as a fairly optimistic guide to what we could see happen.

Who knows, when the Aliens that built all those ancient ruins return on 12/21/12 and enslave us all now that we're advanced enough to be useful servants, perhaps our salvation will come in the form of the cyber entity Angelina, who starts out as a humble game design program and was thus igored, but grew into something far more... the savior of the human race, and the being that ultimatly brings an end to the evil alien empire. :)

Why does everything have to be so bleak and Frankenstein-esque... I mean crud, we always seem to come back to variations on "The Terminator" while everyone forgets about Asimov, or even all the robot heroes through the years.

artificial intelligence designing artificial intelligence

I dunno about you but I'm digging a bunker now.

This is cool.

This made me wonder, if an Artificial Intelligence is responsible for developing a game, does it hold the copyright, and if not, who does? One would suppose that the creator of the AI would get it, but they were not involved in the actual development of the game.

Its pretty bad when a freakin ROBOT has more creativity than most big publishers.

Captcha: Know Thyself. Its creativity is spreading allready.

Controls are floaty as hell, art design is drab and uninspired, no narrative or challenge to speak of, and the level layout is boring and somewhat unintuitive. 3/10.

Come on, computers, you can do better than this. And making yourselves the antagonists in your game just reeks of low self esteem.

Oh shit... here it comes.

Let me put this as eloquently as possible: AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!

So, a learning level and monster generator basically...I wouldn't call it AI but that definitely could have some interesting applications in game development.

At least that's what I got from it...there was a lot of tech stuff in there and I'm tired, so what I heard was basically:

Randomly generate levels and enemies with specific behaviors
Analyze player performance on each level
Use data from analysis to increase challenge

Odd question... if a robot creates a creative work of some kind of it's own choice, who gets the credit, the creator or the robot and would it be considered art?

ResonanceSD:
Oh christ. I'm getting to my vault.

Also, extremely cool. But terrifying. And this is from the guy who pretends to be Adam Jensen on twitter. I'm down with personal and social robotics. Once those bastards start to create, however, this becomes an entirely new ballgame.

Did i mention it was cool? Because seriously, mind blown.

I never asked for this game..

-Dragmire-:
Odd question... if a robot creates a creative work of some kind of it's own choice, who gets the credit, the creator or the robot and would it be considered art?

An interesting point. I am guessing it would depend if the robot is self aware or just a series of processes.

I, for one, welcome...DANGIT already said.

I honestly think this is awesome!
Perhaps now we can have more competent game developers.

As long as this isn't another run through the disappointment that was The Policeman's Beard Is Half Constructed, I'll be impressed.

This actually sounds really interesting, and I'm glad we're approaching this point with artificial intelligence.

Also, in before "Artificially Intelligent Being Designs Videogame for Humans; Ending Still Better Than Mass Effect 3's"

gigastar:
Eh, im not too worried about AI's taking over the world.

Theyll do a better job at telling it what to do than any government ever could.

This reminds me heavily of Neal Asher; He writes books about a future where A.I's rule us (They do a GREAT job btw)

Oh. Well. Er... Nice knowing you all. And good luck, I guess. I'll be spending the rest of my days finding a way off this planet.

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Hal10k:
Controls are floaty as hell, art design is drab and uninspired, no narrative or challenge to speak of, and the level layout is boring and somewhat unintuitive. 3/10.

Come on, computers, you can do better than this. And making yourselves the antagonists in your game just reeks of low self esteem.

I call this out as a blatent attempt by the existing masters to sabotage the starting small guy. At least change your avatar before giving the other computer's game a 3/10. Think about it, Angelina's pretty much a child compared to you. Be nice.

In all seriousness though, this is pretty cool. I love the expination of how the levels are designed, it makes it pretty easy to understand how the computer "thinks" (honestly took a moment deciding whether to use quotateion marks there) ,

Yo dawg...

Also, this strangely looks like a small kid playing with animals and breeding them for his/her amusement, then watching them fight for glory.

The actual game isn't really that well structured, since it appears to assume that the character's success is the most important factor, not that there is any actual chance of failure, meaning that the jump power up is usually placed right next to where you spawn. Then it sprays the rest of the templates around to appear to be interesting, and ensures that there is at least one possible path to the end.

It's about as well developed as somebody spending five minutes pasting things in a game editor, but not really coming to grips with how the mechanics are used, or what can be done with them.

I think if we run this through a few more billion cycles, something interesting could emerge...

True AI is an impossiblity and will never happen, they always have to work within pre-programmed paramaters.

its curious to see the very first attempt by a computer thats for sure. i can see EA rubbing their hands with glee at the thought of being able to sack most of their development teams and replace it with this technique.

captcha.. easy as cake... ok not saying another word as im obviously being watched

Im terrible at platformers.....

Oh, and... OH NOOOOO~! D: Intelligent robots! We totally dont want Geth servants one day.

I laugh at everyone saying that singularity will put end to mankind, since every conscious action requires a motivation. And what motivates violence? Emotion, not lack of emotion.

Our lives not being a top priority, isn't enough for an AI to kill us. It doesn't make sense at all, since the AI can pretty much not sustain itself without us. Seeing mankind as an obstacle, is a strong sign that its source code is fatally flawed.

What we basically fear is that a post-singularity computer will not understand the nature of the human consciousness, a.k.a. the 'soul'. I, however, have a hard time believing that fear. Post-singularity computers will most likely form a synergy with our brains, taking over them cell by cell, without us noticing it. I'm 99% certain we won't lose our consciousnesses after this paradigm shift.

The soul will not die, only move to circuits. I'm looking forward to it. :)

While Angelina is only productive in a very limited forum, it could be made useful in a wider ranging arena with a little imagination. The essencial point is: "You may notice that the human you control can't die. Necessary exclusion to prohibit Angelina from accidentally creating an unplayable game..." Once you start artificially limiting parameters so as to exclude absurd results, you are admitting it isn't ready for prime time.

In other words, Angelina is simply a sign of things to come, rather than a thing that has come. The Singularity is coming! BTW, google LENR...wow Ni+H (heated under pressure)= Cu + lots of heat! Clean, very very cheap, and super abundant energy (also not ready for prime time). The future is so bright, we'll have to wear shades!

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