The Tough Business of Witchering Gets Cinematic

The Tough Business of Witchering Gets Cinematic

A lengthy new pre-release trailer for The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings proves once and for all that witcherin' ain't easy.

Despite being the "hero" of The Witcher RPG games, Geralt and his fellow witchers aren't exactly popular guys. They're tolerated because they're handy at what they do but their powers, the secrecy of their order and the fact that "what they do" pretty much boils down to murder for hire tends to keep them off most Citizen of the Year shortlists. Fans of the first game, or the original novels by Polish author Andrzej Sapkowski, will be familiar with the concept but gamers coming into it cold on the Xbox 360 might find it a little odd.

Witchers are bad dudes by any measure but what makes them uniquely powerful is a combination of forced mutations inflicted on them during childhood, such as the "Trial of the Grasses" mentioned by Geralt in the trailer [which, by the way, is said to kill six out of every ten candidates] and the potions they brew and drink before going into battle, giving them a range of abilities like heightened reflexes or night vision. And it's not mere theatrics; entering combat unprepared in The Witcher games is a sure recipe for trouble.

The video isn't actually part of The Witcher 2 storyline but it is rendered with the REDengine, the same technology used to create the game, and sets the tone of the game world very nicely. The Northern Kingdoms, as we've said before, are not a nice place; they're dirty, violent, racist and unpleasant in just about every way imaginable. Oh, and there are monsters.

The long-awaited Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings comes to the Xbox 360 on April 17.

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Life's a witch, then you die!

Do any of the characters treat Geralt like that in the actual game?

'Cause when I played it they were pretty friendly and chatty and the ladies were practically lining up.

Just makes me want them to do a CGI witcher movie even more!

Or translate The Times of Contempt into english at the very least...

Zhukov:
Do any of the characters treat Geralt like that in the actual game?

They did in the original. Harsh treatment of non-humans was actually a thing in The Witcher, unlike Dragon Age, where it never went much beyond peripheral exposition.

And the ladies like Geralt because not only is he a non-stop stud machine, he's also completely infertile. All the fun with non of the pseudo-medieval unpleasantries of out-of-wedlock childbirth.

Andy Chalk:

Zhukov:
Do any of the characters treat Geralt like that in the actual game?

They did in the original. Harsh treatment of non-humans was actually a thing in The Witcher, unlike Dragon Age, where it never went much beyond peripheral exposition.

Huh.

In Dragon Age my character's city elf cousin got raped by the son of the local human lord because he knew he could get away with it.

In The Witcher 2 everyone treated my supposed mutant outcast like he was just one of the lads. Even the peasants, seen above acting with fear and suspicion, were pretty friendly.

This reminds me, wasn't there a video previously here about the Witcher 2 recapping Witcher 1 in a video or something?

Zhukov:

Andy Chalk:

Zhukov:
Do any of the characters treat Geralt like that in the actual game?

They did in the original. Harsh treatment of non-humans was actually a thing in The Witcher, unlike Dragon Age, where it never went much beyond peripheral exposition.

Huh.

In Dragon Age my character's city elf cousin got raped by the son of the local human lord because he knew he could get away with it.

In The Witcher 2 everyone treated my supposed mutant outcast like he was just one of the lads. Even the peasants, seen above acting with fear and suspicion, were pretty friendly.

I must have a different version than you, cuz pretty much everyone dislikes me in my game. The hookers like me, but that's only cuz I have money. Other than that, I can't really think of anything good other than Tris.

Dandelion and Zoltan. Some of my favorite conversations are with Zoltan. I love the philosophy involved with those conversations.

I am trying to hold off from playing the game for a third time until the Enhanced Edition's out.

I don't think I'm going to make it.

Since when are there horses in The Witcher?

Edit: So I Wiki'd my own question and apparently he always has a horse... and she (he prefers mares) is always named Roach. In my defense, I did play the hell out of The Witcher 2 and never once did I see a god damn horse.

Regardless, great little video.

Zhukov:
In Dragon Age my character's city elf cousin got raped by the son of the local human lord because he knew he could get away with it.

In The Witcher 2 everyone treated my supposed mutant outcast like he was just one of the lads. Even the peasants, seen above acting with fear and suspicion, were pretty friendly.

I suppose interpretation is everything. I played one of the woodsie wood elves in Dragon Age: Origins (whatever they were called) and it seemed like a pretty good life. Everyone was happy, well-fed, seemed to be enjoying life, King Whatshisnuts was quite nice to me, the whole works. In The Witcher, the fear, mistrust and flat-out racism struck me as far more palpable, not to mention that whole war thing going on between them. The story was a bit of a mess, at least until the Enhanced Edition, but I thought it did a far better job of capturing the "feel" of an ugly, divided world than Dragon Age.

Definitely looking forward to this on 360 :3

The video is just making me more excited for it.

Andy Chalk:

Zhukov:
In Dragon Age my character's city elf cousin got raped by the son of the local human lord because he knew he could get away with it.

In The Witcher 2 everyone treated my supposed mutant outcast like he was just one of the lads. Even the peasants, seen above acting with fear and suspicion, were pretty friendly.

I suppose interpretation is everything. I played one of the woodsie wood elves in Dragon Age: Origins (whatever they were called) and it seemed like a pretty good life. Everyone was happy, well-fed, seemed to be enjoying life, King Whatshisnuts was quite nice to me, the whole works. In The Witcher, the fear, mistrust and flat-out racism struck me as far more palpable, not to mention that whole war thing going on between them. The story was a bit of a mess, at least until the Enhanced Edition, but I thought it did a far better job of capturing the "feel" of an ugly, divided world than Dragon Age.

And this truely highlights one of my bugbears with Witcher 2. I mean look at this trailer
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vkBrcF8IYw0
This is mature stuff in every sense of the word. There is no good guys and no bad guys. Only ideology.

And then the dialog writing knocks me out of it. They really need to tone down the excessive use of swears to look as mature as they are in my opinion. Otherwise its so damm fantastic.

Woodsey:
I am trying to hold off from playing the game for a third time until the Enhanced Edition's out.

I don't think I'm going to make it.

I guess that makes two of us.

Woodsey:
I am trying to hold off from playing the game for a third time until the Enhanced Edition's out.

I don't think I'm going to make it.

Oh I know how you feel, it's painful. :(

*Firstworldproblems.jpg*

Draech:
And then the dialog writing knocks me out of it. They really need to tone down the excessive use of swears to look as mature as they are in my opinion. Otherwise its so damm fantastic.

I think that's because people swear in real life, and they're trying to paint a realistic world.

Ekonk:

Draech:
And then the dialog writing knocks me out of it. They really need to tone down the excessive use of swears to look as mature as they are in my opinion. Otherwise its so damm fantastic.

I think that's because people swear in real life, and they're trying to paint a realistic world.

To swear that much makes it lose impact.

A good swear is like the edge of a blade. To much use and it grows dull and loses its sting. It is the most apparent in the game when the curse activates and we get the short of Geralt and whoever he is with at the time seeing the sky darken. There is a swear there, but it has no impact because it has been used as every third word until then.

Andy Chalk:

Zhukov:
In Dragon Age my character's city elf cousin got raped by the son of the local human lord because he knew he could get away with it.

In The Witcher 2 everyone treated my supposed mutant outcast like he was just one of the lads. Even the peasants, seen above acting with fear and suspicion, were pretty friendly.

I suppose interpretation is everything. I played one of the woodsie wood elves in Dragon Age: Origins (whatever they were called) and it seemed like a pretty good life. Everyone was happy, well-fed, seemed to be enjoying life, King Whatshisnuts was quite nice to me, the whole works. In The Witcher, the fear, mistrust and flat-out racism struck me as far more palpable, not to mention that whole war thing going on between them. The story was a bit of a mess, at least until the Enhanced Edition, but I thought it did a far better job of capturing the "feel" of an ugly, divided world than Dragon Age.

You guys seem to be talking about different games...that is, Witcher 2 vs Witcher 1. The people in Witcher 1 are all racist assholes, yeah, but Witcher 2's peasants seem more or less accepting of Geralt's presence. I get the feeling that most of the rude ones are rude to everyone, not just Geralt.

Ihniwid:
Since when are there horses in The Witcher?

Edit: So I Wiki'd my own question and apparently he always has a horse... and she (he prefers mares) is always named Roach. In my defense, I did play the hell out of The Witcher 2 and never once did I see a god damn horse.

Regardless, great little video.

I've never seen a horse in 2 but you do see one at the start of the first one if my memory serves me correctly.

dyre:

Andy Chalk:

Zhukov:
In Dragon Age my character's city elf cousin got raped by the son of the local human lord because he knew he could get away with it.

In The Witcher 2 everyone treated my supposed mutant outcast like he was just one of the lads. Even the peasants, seen above acting with fear and suspicion, were pretty friendly.

I suppose interpretation is everything. I played one of the woodsie wood elves in Dragon Age: Origins (whatever they were called) and it seemed like a pretty good life. Everyone was happy, well-fed, seemed to be enjoying life, King Whatshisnuts was quite nice to me, the whole works. In The Witcher, the fear, mistrust and flat-out racism struck me as far more palpable, not to mention that whole war thing going on between them. The story was a bit of a mess, at least until the Enhanced Edition, but I thought it did a far better job of capturing the "feel" of an ugly, divided world than Dragon Age.

You guys seem to be talking about different games...that is, Witcher 2 vs Witcher 1. The people in Witcher 1 are all racist assholes, yeah, but Witcher 2's peasants seem more or less accepting of Geralt's presence. I get the feeling that most of the rude ones are rude to everyone, not just Geralt.

Here's another take on the treatment of Geralt in W2. Some spoilers probably, so you are warned, dear reader.

In the first town you enter the town with one of Foltests assassins and his mates. You then proceed to punch out the local tyrant and magistrate and prevent him from hanging people. That might well explain why people take care to not piss you off. You are in a position of power.

In the army camp you again arrive with Roche and you also save Demavend and nob around with the kings and ambassadors. I'm not surprised that common soldiers tread carefully around what basically is a stranger who has gotten on good terms with their king.

In the city with Jorveth half their ideology is embracing that people are different. Saskia is all for tolerance.

In the final act, people are perhaps preoccupied with the meeting of the powers of the north.

Draech:

A good swear is like the edge of a blade. To much use and it grows dull and loses its sting. It is the most apparent in the game when the curse activates and we get the short of Geralt and whoever he is with at the time seeing the sky darken. There is a swear there, but it has no impact because it has been used as every third word until then.

You've never been to Glasgow, have you?

Seriously, that's one way to use swearwords but it's not the only way people actually do use swearwords. I never felt that the swearing in either Witcher game broke immersion. (The crappy combat and ropey voice action in TW1 did, on occasion. TW2 on the other hand is superb, a bright, bloomy hellish playground I really lost myself in. I do however have some issues with both games from a feminist perspective.)

teh_gunslinger:
In the army camp you again arrive with Roche and you also save Demavend and nob around with the kings and ambassadors. I'm not surprised that common soldiers tread carefully around what basically is a stranger who has gotten on good terms with their king.

Pardon me for intruding like this, but wasn't Demavend said to be dead at the beginning of the game or somewhere at the end of the prologue? He was the king of Aedirn, right? But the military camp in Act 2 was Kaedwen's, wasn't it?

James Crook:

teh_gunslinger:
In the army camp you again arrive with Roche and you also save Demavend and nob around with the kings and ambassadors. I'm not surprised that common soldiers tread carefully around what basically is a stranger who has gotten on good terms with their king.

Pardon me for intruding like this, but wasn't Demavend said to be dead at the beginning of the game or somewhere at the end of the prologue? He was the king of Aedirn, right? But the military camp in Act 2 was Kaedwen's, wasn't it?

You're right. I'm of course talking about the rather large bearded fellow in Act 2. Couldn't have sworn his name was Demavend. It's Henselt though. Apologies for that brain fart.

teh_gunslinger:
You're right. I'm of course talking about the rather large bearded fellow in Act 2. Couldn't have sworn his name was Demavend. It's Henselt though. Apologies for that brain fart.

Oh, yeah, Henselt, that fat pig that went and got himself cursed by his witch right-hand lady...

James Crook:

teh_gunslinger:
You're right. I'm of course talking about the rather large bearded fellow in Act 2. Couldn't have sworn his name was Demavend. It's Henselt though. Apologies for that brain fart.

Oh, yeah, Henselt, that fat pig that went and got himself cursed by his witch right-hand lady...

Yea, he really was quite an unpleasant fellow. Like so many people in that world. :)
I sometimes regret not letting Roche do him in after that whole business with Ves.

ms_sunlight:

Draech:

A good swear is like the edge of a blade. To much use and it grows dull and loses its sting. It is the most apparent in the game when the curse activates and we get the short of Geralt and whoever he is with at the time seeing the sky darken. There is a swear there, but it has no impact because it has been used as every third word until then.

You've never been to Glasgow, have you?

Seriously, that's one way to use swearwords but it's not the only way people actually do use swearwords. I never felt that the swearing in either Witcher game broke immersion. (The crappy combat and ropey voice action in TW1 did, on occasion. TW2 on the other hand is superb, a bright, bloomy hellish playground I really lost myself in. I do however have some issues with both games from a feminist perspective.)

The world of The Witcher is very sexist to begin with. I do like that they toned down the sexism in TW2 when comparing it to the first game, but it's still present enough to remind you that the world you're in isn't a very pleasant one. The swearing was kept pretty much the same between the first and second game. Again, the swearing is also part of the books.

 

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