Politicians Amend Controversial CISPA Security Bill

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Politicians Amend Controversial CISPA Security Bill

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CISPA, an accused relative of SOPA, "still fails" on privacy despite recent amendments.

Hey everyone! Remember how much fun we had with the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and the Protect IP Act (PIPA) earlier this year? Man, those were the days. Both bills threatened business, privacy, and the functionality of the internet as we know it and we defeated them through the power of browser-based activism. Good job, internet.

However, it would appear that the U.S. government is not through with controversial internet legislation just yet. For the past few weeks Reddit, Avaaz.org and other such sites have featured prominent calls from activists and commentators urging citizens of the internet to turn their powers of petition against a new cybersecurity bill which they say could be just as harmful as SOPA and PIPA, albeit in slightly different ways. The name of the bill is the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA), and it's up for debate and vote in Congress at the end of this week.

On the face of it, CISPA looks fairly innocuous; it's designed to allow corporations and the government to share information with each other that would allow them to better track and stop hackers, cyberterrorists, and other such unpleasant types. However, the language of the bill is so broad that analysts fear it could give the government the scope to track internet users' personal data on an indefinite basis without having to tell anyone about it. No warrants, no heads-up, nothing.

To address these fears, Reps. Mike Rogers (R-Mich.) and Dutch Ruppersberger (D-Md.), the bill's sponsors, set about amending the legislation and this week presented a version of CISPA which they say is much friendlier towards the rights of the internet-browsing individual. According to reports, the amended bill restricts the government's ability to collect data to situations which involve stopping "cybersecurity, investigating and prosecuting cyber crime, protecting individuals from death or serious bodily harm, protecting minors from child pornography, and ensuring national security."

"I am very pleased with where the bill stands today," Rep. Rogers said in a statement. "Our bill is designed to help protect American companies from advanced foreign cyber threats, like those posed by the Chinese government. It has always been my desire to do that in a manner that doesn't sacrifice the privacy and civil liberties of Americans, and I am confident that we have achieved that goal."

According to some commentators, however, even the amended language is too broad. According to the Center for Democracy and Technology, the bill still "falls short" on privacy. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) of the House Intelligence Committee isn't too pleased either, and has indicated that he intends to make his own amendments to the bill to limit the collection of personal information and "narrowly define" the purposes for which the government can use information obtained from companies.

Despite this, the bill has no shortage of support in Congress. Private sector support for CISPA has been declared by companies such as Facebook and Microsoft. Rep. Rogers is quoted as saying that, "Every corner of the private sector loves this bill...They need the help. They need it now. And they are absolutely under siege."

CISPA's sponsors expect the bill to pass a vote later this week without issue. If you'd like to learn more and register your opposition (if you have any), here's a link an an anti-CISPA Avaaz.org petition which has garnered almost 800,000 signatures so far. The Center for Democracy and Technology's resources page is also a great source of CISPA-news. Wherever you stand, however, time is of the essence in making up your mind; the bill is headed to Congress and a vote as we speak.

Source: Huffington Post

Permalink

What say we move that internet shut-down up by a couple of months?

Seriously Dutch?

*sigh*

As a Marylander I apologize for the representative having lost his god damn mind and look forward to remedying the problem this year...hopefully...even though the guy keeps running without any real opposition. Dammit I hate this state.

shadowmagus:
Seriously Dutch?

*sigh*

As a Marylander I apologize for the representative having lost his god damn mind and look forward to remedying the problem this year...hopefully...even though the guy keeps running without any real opposition. Dammit I hate this state.

I lived there growing up. I hated it. I now live in Jersey. Jersey is better than Maryland IMO.

Well, even if this bill gets shot down, which hopefully it does, the dumbass brigade will try again.

We need a more permanent solution to this kinda problem. A way to kill the Hydra and take out all its heads in one blow, if you will.

...*sigh*

Here we go again...

Oh well, nothing quite like terrible "anti-piracy" legislation to bring all the denizens of the internet together under a singular banner of HATE!

You seem to be forgetting about ACTA. You know, the widely ignored bill of Europe that threatened the internet just as much as SOPA and PIPA and why do Americans only care about shit if it's in their own damned yard.

Hah, piracy is considered a cyber crime and can easily be used by this act to shut down sites that may allow file sharing of any kind.
Trolling is also a cyber crime so that could lead to tracking social sites with aims to stop trolls, and only as a coincidence allow access to a lot of personal information.
Basically its damn easy to use this act to really mess up the net and any delusions of privacy.

Thats politics in a democratic world, ask the people and if the people say no... ask again in a different way, until the people accidentaly agree.

Can I haz cake ? NO
Can I haz the confectionary ? NO
Can I haz the plate the confectionary is on ? NOOOO
Can I wash the plate the confectionary is on ? Errr...ye... nooo nooo
Can I haz the deed to the property the confectionary is in ? WTF , noo
Can I donate the deed to the property the confectionary is in to a charity ? Huh... nooooo
etc etc ad nauseum ad infinitum.

Sis:
You seem to be forgetting about ACTA. You know, the widely ignored bill of Europe that threatened the internet just as much as SOPA and PIPA and why do Americans only care about shit if it's in their own damned yard.

Well, the only things I can say here are that I'm not American, and ACTA has nothing to do CISPA being amended. As regards ACTA specifically, I'm (personally) waiting on the EU's verdict in June. There'll definitely be a report on that. Also, correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't the US signed up to ACTA too?

So don't worry, nobody's forgotten.

RatRace123:
Well, even if this bill gets shot down, which hopefully it does, the dumbass brigade will try again.

We need a more permanent solution to this kinda problem. A way to kill the Hydra and take out all its heads in one blow, if you will.

I think the only way to make any real change in America is if we all focus on electing local congressmen who we can trust not to pass freedom taking bills like SOPA or NDAA. Really it would involve kicking out at least 80% of congress at this point.

And we should just forget the presidential elections, the design of our country makes it so the president can't do all that much, which is a good thing.

Sis:
You seem to be forgetting about ACTA. You know, the widely ignored bill of Europe that threatened the internet just as much as SOPA and PIPA and why do Americans only care about shit if it's in their own damned yard.

ACTA is an American instigated trade agreement. The US ratified it without congress etc some years ago. It is just that EU are on the fence about ratifying it.

I'm afraid all these dumb ideas come from the US. Sorry...

Looks like for the low amount responses here, there is less apatite to try to stop this one. Shame. If I was American I would.

I like the amended bill even less. The original version was not near as broad as the EFF made it out to be (and, IMO, absolutely nothing new). This version is actually worse.

Is this one of the real concerns, or one of the made up ones? So many of these bills don't do what we're told by scaremongering internet types that it's hard to keep track of legit threats.

Sis:
You seem to be forgetting about ACTA. You know, the widely ignored bill of Europe that threatened the internet just as much as SOPA and PIPA and why do Americans only care about shit if it's in their own damned yard.

You know ACTA started in America, right?

That kinda makes your complaint look pretty damn funny.

ph0b0s123:

Looks like for the low amount responses here, there is less apatite to try to stop this one. Shame. If I was American I would.

that's because after SOPA/PIPA, everyone declared victory. They were so loud at self-congratulating, they drowned out everything else. And then they went back to the holding pattern of ignorance that has slowly eroded our freedoms since, just like before.

Sheesh, they won't give up easily, will they? Looks like it's not over yet...

RatRace123:
Well, even if this bill gets shot down, which hopefully it does, the dumbass brigade will try again.

We need a more permanent solution to this kinda problem. A way to kill the Hydra and take out all its heads in one blow, if you will.

Right, what they said.

ph0b0s123:

Sis:
You seem to be forgetting about ACTA. You know, the widely ignored bill of Europe that threatened the internet just as much as SOPA and PIPA and why do Americans only care about shit if it's in their own damned yard.

ACTA is an American instigated trade agreement. The US ratified it without congress etc some years ago. It is just that EU are on the fence about ratifying it.

I'm afraid all these dumb ideas come from the US. Sorry...

Looks like for the low amount responses here, there is less apatite to try to stop this one. Shame. If I was American I would.

I remeber when ACTA started popping up (shortly after the SOPA situation) Escapists were already complaining about being tired of the "overreaction". I'm afraid Escapists are a bit too hipster for their own good.

fyi people, this is going to take diligence. This is nothing more than us out enduring them.

Just remember, gotta keep shooting these down until McCain and Kerry get to work on that "internet bill of rights" then we will have the last laugh.

Now, anyone that says "im sick of fighting" Kindly grow a pair.

RT-Medic-with-shotgun:
Just remember, gotta keep shooting these down until McCain and Kerry get to work on that "internet bill of rights" then we will have the last laugh.

Now, anyone that says "im sick of fighting" Kindly grow a pair.

Who would be sick of fighting? I for one am not.

Not this shit again... oh well, at least it's noticeably better than SOPA and PIPA. Maybe if you tighten up some of the clauses and specialize the bill a bit more, maybe people will accept it...

RaikuFA:

RT-Medic-with-shotgun:
Just remember, gotta keep shooting these down until McCain and Kerry get to work on that "internet bill of rights" then we will have the last laugh.

Now, anyone that says "im sick of fighting" Kindly grow a pair.

Who would be sick of fighting? I for one am not.

Apparently some escapists act like this is no danger to them. That we are all jumping on the bandwagon for something to bitch about. Frankly i would like to tell them that i have plenty to bitch about, and one more thing to fight about is no problem.

Yo folks, some good news. It seems Obama is threatening to veto the bill.

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/OTUS/cispa-cybersecurity-bill-veto-threat-obama/story?id=16214940#.T5h0LqtYsa4

So... there's still hope.

Doesn't the bill, as it stands, essentially allow for corporations to give your private data to the government and other corporations as well?

RatRace123:
Well, even if this bill gets shot down, which hopefully it does, the dumbass brigade will try again.

We need a more permanent solution to this kinda problem. A way to kill the Hydra and take out all its heads in one blow, if you will.

So what you're saying is, we need to gather up the politicians who support these bills, and set them on fire?

I'm game. I'll grab the oil and torches.

Hevva:
According to reports, the amended bill restricts the government's ability to collect data to situations which involve stopping "cybersecurity, investigating and prosecuting cyber crime, protecting individuals from death or serious bodily harm, protecting minors from child pornography, and ensuring national security."

Not that I want to piss on everyone's hate parade, but don't these sound like legitimate reasons to breach someone's privacy? Also, why is it that everyone is so concerned about the internet being this ultimate sanctuary of privacy, when the right to privacy isn't even properly defined in the U.S. constitution? Because to me that really seems like an issue that should be addressed first.

Zachary Amaranth:

ph0b0s123:

Looks like for the low amount responses here, there is less apatite to try to stop this one. Shame. If I was American I would.

that's because after SOPA/PIPA, everyone declared victory. They were so loud at self-congratulating, they drowned out everything else. And then they went back to the holding pattern of ignorance that has slowly eroded our freedoms since, just like before.

Also corporations like Facebook and Microsoft rallied people to be against SOPA and PIPA. It seems like this time they agree with the bill.

RatRace123:
Well, even if this bill gets shot down, which hopefully it does, the dumbass brigade will try again.

We need a more permanent solution to this kinda problem. A way to kill the Hydra and take out all its heads in one blow, if you will.

Hmm... at least its sponsors are trying to fix the problems with it at all. That's more than we can say of the authors of PIPA and SOPA.

But, yes, we do need a better way of getting rid of this kind of thing.

One of the main issues, as I see it, is that the U.S. Constitution doesn't explicitly guarantee us the right to privacy, under any circumstances. Rather, it only implies that right through the First and Fourth Amendments. I think we need an Amendment that DOES explicitly give us the right to privacy.

Sis:
You seem to be forgetting about ACTA. You know, the widely ignored bill of Europe that threatened the internet just as much as SOPA and PIPA and why do Americans only care about shit if it's in their own damned yard.

Seriously? They have no obligation to care about us because we brought this upon ourselves.

In the EU, any Constitution is simply irrelevant. We basically have no rights and they have a huge battle ahead.

Why would they care?

Farther than stars:
Not that I want to piss on everyone's hate parade, but don't these sound like legitimate reasons to breach someone's privacy? Also, why is it that everyone is so concerned about the internet being this ultimate sanctuary of privacy, when the right to privacy isn't even properly defined in the U.S. constitution? Because to me that really seems like an issue that should be addressed first.

The Bill of Rights, however, reflects the concern of James Madison and other framers for protecting specific aspects of privacy, such as the privacy of beliefs (1st Amendment), privacy of the home against demands that it be used to house soldiers (3rd Amendment), privacy of the person and possessions as against unreasonable searches (4th Amendment), and the 5th Amendment's privilege against self-incrimination, which provides protection for the privacy of personal information. In addition, the Ninth Amendment states that the "enumeration of certain rights" in the Bill of Rights "shall not be construed to deny or disparage other rights retained by the people."

Naive question. How exactly does this information help the US government stop hackers?

They can't just send Seal Team 6 into China to tie up their hackers and drag them back to the states for trial (or Guantanamo Bay, for thatmatter). I don't know much about international law, or cybersecurity, but I don't understand how gathering all this information solves the problem of enforcement.

Unless the accused lives in the United States. Then the FBI kicks in your door and hauls you off to Leavenworth.

Again, naive question, but why doesn't Congress just appropriate some cash to google or a national lab to develop software that tracks and blocks all traffic originating in a specific country (e.g., China, since we seem to know those guys are the problem) and sell it to US companies to protect their cyber assets. Seems to me like a technical solution would be better suited to this problem, but know fuck-all about cybersecurity, so maybe it isn't even possible to do that.

Irridium:
Yo folks, some good news. It seems Obama is threatening to veto the bill.

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/OTUS/cispa-cybersecurity-bill-veto-threat-obama/story?id=16214940#.T5h0LqtYsa4

So... there's still hope.

I believe we've seen this before, he won't veto

Let them have it if you have nothing to hide...

Hevva:

Sis:
You seem to be forgetting about ACTA. You know, the widely ignored bill of Europe that threatened the internet just as much as SOPA and PIPA and why do Americans only care about shit if it's in their own damned yard.

Well, the only things I can say here are that I'm not American, and ACTA has nothing to do CISPA being amended. As regards ACTA specifically, I'm (personally) waiting on the EU's verdict in June. There'll definitely be a report on that. Also, correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't the US signed up to ACTA too?

So don't worry, nobody's forgotten.

Yes, ACTA is indeed an international treaty. President Obama signed it into law as an executive order, under the claim that it basically does everything the DMCA does, which is why he doesn't need congressional approval to enter into the treaty. Which is entirely unconstitutional, but hey, when has that ever stopped politicians before?

I would like to direct you attention to a White House press release regarding this:

http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/omb/legislative/sap/112/saphr3523r_20120425.pdf

It directly states (in bolded underline no less!): "However, for the reasons stated herein,
if H.R. 3523 were presented to the President, his senior advisors would recommend that he veto
the bill."

Looks like this one isn't getting into law either!

Bills like this make me think we need some kind of system where we can fire and ban the politician. Recall elections are close but it doesn't quite help if the rep isn't from my state.

Hevva:
To address these fears, Reps. Mike Rogers (R-Mich.) and Dutch Ruppersberger (D-Md.), the bill's sponsors, set about amending the legislation and this week presented a version of CISPA which they say is much friendlier towards the rights of the internet-browsing individual. According to reports, the amended bill restricts the government's ability to collect data to situations which involve stopping "cybersecurity, investigating and prosecuting cyber crime, protecting individuals from death or serious bodily harm, protecting minors from child pornography, and ensuring national security."

Uhh... Escapists, I've been a huge anti-SOPA and PIPA person on these boards, and generally am very unhappy with how these bills are being made and passed. But I searched through the bill, read majority of it and understood most of it, and also keyword searched through it.

There really isn't anything to fear. There was no mention of finding people for death or serious bodily harm, protecting against child porngraphy, nothing like that. Seriously, try and use the Find button on the bill and no such terms as "death, serious, bodily, harm, child, minor, pornography, porn" etc come up. Ever.

I think people really need to calm down and quit with the media fear. We blame Fox News of attacking everything with fear, but we ourselves seem to do it too when we post up claiming everything is SOPA equivalents.

Read the bill yourselves: http://rules.house.gov/media/file/PDF_112_2/LegislativeText/CPRT-112-HPRT-RU00-HR3523.pdf

It even says in Page 10 Section A (line 23 on that page for you folks) that if it the Government screws up in any way with this law, it'll pay all your fees, reimburse you, and give you $1,000 for the error and then void any charges against you because of it.

Lets all take a step back from the rage and maybe understand why it's passed so well now when previous bills didn't, and with support of companies that previously didn't support such bills... maybe because it's actually a good version?

Come on, now. (Prepares flameshield for those who won't read the bill and claim I'm some Fed in disguise)

TLDR: Bring me the sections that support these claims it's another SOPA, tell me the page, section, and line, and I'll agree then if you're correct.

I thought America got over McCarthyism and the 'ZOMG COMMUNISTS ARE ALL BAD AND ALL OUT TO GET US' scare like, 40 years ago after people didn't like who was being prosecuted?

Looks like they haven't, because THE DAMN CHINESE GUVMINT IS AT IT AGAIN!

'''(1) LIMITATION.-The Federal Government
8
may use cyber threat information shared with the
9
Federal Government in accordance with subsection
10
(b) for any lawful purpose only if-
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''(A) the use of such information is not for
12
a regulatory purpose; and
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''(B) at least one significant purpose of the
14
use of such information is-
15
''(i) a cybersecurity purpose; or
16
''(ii) the protection of the national se-
17
curity of the United States. '

Does that not sound like they give themselves a 'get out of jail free card' for spying on foreigners, then implementing their infamous black bag-style policy for extradition(we arrest you, then you're never allowed in our SUPER DUPER country that you've never been to again!)

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