Nintendo Says You're Playing Kid Icarus: Uprising Wrong

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We all remember the Jimquisition responding when somebody else said 'You're playing the game wrong'

Don't insult the hand that feeds you

evilneko:

Iphone 4. "You're holding it wrong." Yeah, that was a thing.

Oh yeah, I remember that. Sorry, I was thinking game devs specifically, so when you mentioned it, I was thinking in terms of apps or something.

Fault is mine for not specifying and then not thinking broad enough when you mentioned it.

These have nice parallels, too. Both are instances where the people behind it actually failed to take into account the limitations of the hardware and the user. The iPhone thing is something I wouldn't notice, because I use a bluetooth conntection (my neck and shoulder are messed up), but the way it's being "held wrong" is the way most people handle a phone. Kid Icarus: Uprising actually had to "patch" the system by adding virtually mandatory hardware because they actually didn't think about how it would really play out.

I don't even think the stand looks like a total solution. Looks like enough pressure on the D-Pad would tip the system. As such, the "ease up on your fingers" thing makes me think "I can't! I'd break this overprice hardware you sold me on!"

I actually support most of the weight of the DS (don't own a 3DS yet, but really wanted this game to be good) on my left hand, anyway, so I'm not sure this would bug me. But like the above, it's a problem for a good chunk of the userbase.

Although, like the iPhone, duct tape seems a good solution.

rhizhim:

he is right.
so many gamers today have lost the art of slapping your dick on the controller.

this way you would have your other fingers to control the character.

women can use a strap-on.

That is such utter crap.

Women don't play games. >.>

PeaceRider:
Call me a nintendo fanboy, but I'm agreeing with Mr.Sakurai here.

I'm not sure you're a fanboy, but I do think you're being a little ridiculous.

All those messed up joysticks, stuck A buttons, and broken TV's that have a Wiimote sticking out of them, all are because we gamers tend to play a little to hard.

When I was eight and playing an NES, I wasn't concerned with hardware longevity because my parents bought me the stuff. I only ever bought one extra controller and to my knowledge both still work.

In my 20s and playing Microsoft, Sony and Nintendo consoles, I go through controllers a lot faster, though I'm more careful because it's another 60 dollars out of my pocket if I break it. Those A buttons often wear out faster because they're made cheaper and because the A button is used for so much. Same with the joysticks. And the Wiimotes going through TVs are largely an issue of making a motion-based controller out of slick plastic and expecting it to operate in dynamic situations without injury or mishap. That's kind of like designing your floor with a microfriction finish and asking the guy who slips on it to share the blame.

Putting up warnings is well and good, but in the end the Wiimote is part of a system meant to be played, with activities aimed at young children no less. It's ridiculous to put so little thought into the primary user interface.

And it's similar with the argument going on here. "Well, we made a bandaid that doesn't completely address the issues brought to us, so now you must share the blame, too." And complaining that people are complaining is all well and good, but they really didn't address all the issues, so pointing out that people are complaining is hardly worth it. "Oh, look at those people whose issues weren't solved! What ingrates and hypocrites...Or something."

Building a bad control scheme, with "options" that do not entirely fix the problem kind of IS their fault. All their fault. And "Well, I don't mind it" doesn't really hold water as a counter-complaint. To nick from the Jimquisition, "Better does not mean good." They may have offered a better option, but not a good one. And this is still a problem built on a faulty foundation, a control scheme they should have known would be a problem.

This is sort of a dick move on their part but luckily I had absolutely no problem with the controls so bonus I guess. I can see why people might not like them but is it really so hard to hold the console with one hand and the stylus in the other?

crazyarms33:

Samus Aaron:
Woah, hold on! Nintendo is not saying "You're playing it wrong." Nowhere in the article does Nintendo say anything along those lines. It's recommending a different style of play, not outright attacking players' choices. While the title of this article isn't an outright lie (although by writing 'Nintendo says', the author might as well be putting words into the company's mouth), there is no denying that the author of this article is writing this news in a deceptive, borderline sensationalist manner.

Really? I mean...really? How would you have titled it then? I would just like to know because I know that personally, I didn't read that as sensationalist headline at all given the context of the article. The subtext of what he said (as I interpret it) is essentially "If you played it like I meant for it to be played, there would be no issues!" And let's be real here, if squeezing the DS with a certain amount of force has to be factored into the way you play...then something is wrong.

I would not have titled it, because this story does not even deserve to be published at all. It is not news. It doesn't tell us anything we can't figure out for ourselves, or that we don't know already.

Look at the source of this article, which is provided at the bottom of the story. (http://uk.ds.ign.com/articles/122/1224194p1.html). Notice how the Escapist article reports only a small snippet - and not even a very important one at that - of what is in fact a larger and more comprehensive interview about Kid Icarus Uprising in general. So the author sifts through all of this information, and what does he choose? A harmless suggestion by Sakurai about a few ways that players can play their game if they want a more enjoyable experience. And of course, the author turns it into "Nintendo (the entire company, rather than just Sakurai) says you're (appeal to the reader's emotions by making it about YOU) playing Kid Icarus Uprising wrong (where, tell me, WHERE is the word 'wrong' in the interview?)."

Notice that the explanation for 'why' Sakurai says what he says is given in the article itself. But just take a look at the comments on this article* - judging by the number of people who express outrage at "Nintendo telling them they are wrong" and little else, the vast majority of people seem to have taken one look at the title and gone straight to the comments. Those little details for 'why' a different control scheme was unfeasible don't seem to have mattered to the readers of the article - they fall to the periphery while the outrage takes center focus, and who can blame them? The title of the article tells readers how to feel before they even know what they're reading; in other words, this story has been spun. It is, for lack of a better word, sensationalism.

So to answer your question, assuming that this article even deserves to be written, I would have titled it "In Defense of Kid Icarus Uprising's Controls: Director Masahiro Sakurai responds to critics and even compares Pit's adventure to Super Smash Bros." See, that's impartial, and actually prepares us for what we're about to read.

You may have noticed that this title is the same as the title of IGN's parent article. That's because IGN posted the real story - unlike this spun article, which, were it not for the unfitting title, would have actually been a relatively fair read.

*For comparison, look at the comments on IGN's article. Notice how their comments are generally about their annoyance with the controls, rather than about their outrage at Nintendo's audacity to tell them that they're "playing it wrong." Even more evidence that this story has been spun.

So, if ZP's review is anything to go by, you need to move with the control pad/analog stick, pretty shoulder buttons and/or normal buttons AND use the stylus.

Now, forgive my ignorance having neither a 3DS or ever playing one (though having a normal DS), but that means controlling the pad with your left hand and the buttons/stylus with your right hand, correct?
Well I have one thing to say about that. Screw you, I'm left handed and cannot draw or use the stylus with my right hand. I'm not ambidextrous either. So sod off "Mr. Developer" for telling me YOUR control scheme is in the right and I'd be in the wrong for playing a game you created.

I personally avoided this game because I think that Pit is a total twat but it sounds like that is the least of this game's problems.

RedEyesBlackGamer:
That's right, players. The problem isn't with my control scheme, it is with your playstyle. Seriously, just admit that you made a less than optimal control setup.

Yes, and no.

He is right in saying that the control scheme works for the game. Compare to what most of the "Glorious PC Gaming Master Race" says regarding playing FPS games with a Keyboard/Mouse against a Contrroller. The problem is that it's less than optimal for the player. I think the title is a little more inflammatory than Sakurai was intending, but sometimes you do have to take some time to learn how to use things properly. But I plan to actually give his advice a try before I can pass judgement on it.

Byere:
So, if ZP's review is anything to go by, you need to move with the control pad/analog stick, pretty shoulder buttons and/or normal buttons AND use the stylus.

Now, forgive my ignorance having neither a 3DS or ever playing one (though having a normal DS), but that means controlling the pad with your left hand and the buttons/stylus with your right hand, correct?
Well I have one thing to say about that. Screw you, I'm left handed and cannot draw or use the stylus with my right hand. I'm not ambidextrous either. So sod off "Mr. Developer" for telling me YOUR control scheme is in the right and I'd be in the wrong for playing a game you created.

Ah, no. You move with the analog stick, fire with the L button (R if you're left-handed and have the 2nd stick accessory), aim with the stylus. It works fine. The problem is that it puts all of the 3DS' weight on one wrist, and the 3DS is noticeably heavier than the DS Lite/i. After a while (usually within the time it takes to complete a stage or two), you start to feel the strain.

Yes, now why didn't you actually put tips in your game telling the player that? It might of saved you the trouble.

Well, another developer I have absolutely no respect for now. There are times when people play games wrong, but if you made shitty controls, that is on you, not the player.

Pandora92:
Also does this remind anyone else of Apple's "the phones are fine, you're just holding it wrong" thing?

Yes.

Samus Aaron:
I would not have titled it, because this story does not even deserve to be published at all. It is not news. It doesn't tell us anything we can't figure out for ourselves, or that we don't know already.

Look at the source of this article, which is provided at the bottom of the story. (http://uk.ds.ign.com/articles/122/1224194p1.html). Notice how the Escapist article reports only a small snippet - and not even a very important one at that - of what is in fact a larger and more comprehensive interview about Kid Icarus Uprising in general. So the author sifts through all of this information, and what does he choose? A harmless suggestion by Sakurai about a few ways that players can play their game if they want a more enjoyable experience. And of course, the author turns it into "Nintendo (the entire company, rather than just Sakurai) says you're (appeal to the reader's emotions by making it about YOU) playing Kid Icarus Uprising wrong (where, tell me, WHERE is the word 'wrong' in the interview?)."

Notice that the explanation for 'why' Sakurai says what he says is given in the article itself. But just take a look at the comments on this article* - judging by the number of people who express outrage at "Nintendo telling them they are wrong" and little else, the vast majority of people seem to have taken one look at the title and gone straight to the comments. Those little details for 'why' a different control scheme was unfeasible don't seem to have mattered to the readers of the article - they fall to the periphery while the outrage takes center focus, and who can blame them? The title of the article tells readers how to feel before they even know what they're reading; in other words, this story has been spun. It is, for lack of a better word, sensationalism.

So to answer your question, assuming that this article even deserves to be written, I would have titled it "In Defense of Kid Icarus Uprising's Controls: Director Masahiro Sakurai responds to critics and even compares Pit's adventure to Super Smash Bros." See, that's impartial, and actually prepares us for what we're about to read.

You may have noticed that this title is the same as the title of IGN's parent article. That's because IGN posted the real story - unlike this spun article, which, were it not for the unfitting title, would have actually been a relatively fair read.

*For comparison, look at the comments on IGN's article. Notice how their comments are generally about their annoyance with the controls, rather than about their outrage at Nintendo's audacity to tell them that they're "playing it wrong." Even more evidence that this story has been spun.

Okay then, ignore my previous statement about not respecting this developer anymore. Turns out the only thing doing something wrong is the Escapist. They do this all the time, I don't know why I bother to click on their "news" articles anymore. I need to learn to just come and watch Jimquisition, Zero Punctuation, and then leave without clicking anything else because nothing else here is ever worth it anymore. I mean, it really is a sad state of affairs if your news articles are worse than ones written by IGN.

Um, try playing the FEAR games without headphones and pretending it's Quake Live or something. It's quite possible to play a game the way it wasn't intended and get the wrong impression of it, get over yourselves.

mjc0961:

Samus Aaron:
snip

Okay then, ignore my previous statement about not respecting this developer anymore. Turns out the only thing doing something wrong is the Escapist. They do this all the time, I don't know why I bother to click on their "news" articles anymore. I need to learn to just come and watch Jimquisition, Zero Punctuation, and then leave without clicking anything else because nothing else here is ever worth it anymore. I mean, it really is a sad state of affairs if your news articles are worse than ones written by IGN.

Please, don't think that I'm saying IGN is a better news website than The Escapist. I don't go to IGN, so I don't know the quality of their news, and from what other people tend to say, it seems like people have a generally negative opinion of IGN. When I say "IGN posted the real story," I'm only talking about this story in particular. However, I do go to the Escapist often, and in general the news is fair and impartial. But I do see a few articles from time to time that do what this this article has done, and in this case, I decided to address it.

SAMAS:

Byere:
-snip-

Ah, no. You move with the analog stick, fire with the L button (R if you're left-handed and have the 2nd stick accessory), aim with the stylus. It works fine. The problem is that it puts all of the 3DS' weight on one wrist, and the 3DS is noticeably heavier than the DS Lite/i. After a while (usually within the time it takes to complete a stage or two), you start to feel the strain.

Ah, my mistake, but that still means I have to go out and purchase something I should already have for the game JUST BECAUSE I'm left handed. Seems a little unfair. A better way would have been that you use the 4 buttons as the way to move in a D-pad style controller instead of having to buy a second analog stick. But hey, what do I know... I'm just the consumer and it would be silly for me to tell the developer what might be a good idea...

SAMAS:

Byere:
So, if ZP's review is anything to go by, you need to move with the control pad/analog stick, pretty shoulder buttons and/or normal buttons AND use the stylus.

Now, forgive my ignorance having neither a 3DS or ever playing one (though having a normal DS), but that means controlling the pad with your left hand and the buttons/stylus with your right hand, correct?
Well I have one thing to say about that. Screw you, I'm left handed and cannot draw or use the stylus with my right hand. I'm not ambidextrous either. So sod off "Mr. Developer" for telling me YOUR control scheme is in the right and I'd be in the wrong for playing a game you created.

Ah, no. You move with the analog stick, fire with the L button (R if you're left-handed and have the 2nd stick accessory), aim with the stylus. It works fine. The problem is that it puts all of the 3DS' weight on one wrist, and the 3DS is noticeably heavier than the DS Lite/i. After a while (usually within the time it takes to complete a stage or two), you start to feel the strain.

The 3DS is ~20 grams(~3/4ths of an ounce) heavier than the DS Lite and DSi, and 40 grams(~1.5 ounces) lighter than the beast of a handheld that was the original DS. I don't remember anyone complaining about sore wrists with all of the games that used the D-pad/face buttons and the shoulder buttons while requiring extensive use of the stylus. Phantom Hourglass anyone? Metroid Prime: Hunters? You plop the DS on your pinky, cradle it between the pad of your thumb and your middle and ring finger, use your thumb for the D-pad/face buttons/circle pad, and your pointer for the shoulder button. The only problems arise if you've got really small or really big hands.

Scarim Coral:
I would love to hear Yatzee his reply to Masahiro Sakurai statement, not in a reply video but a face to face open statement with a translator of course.

I was just hoping he'd address it in Extra Punctuation, but a video would be nice; I wouldn't expect more than that.

SuperTrainStationH:

theultimateend:

newwiseman:
If your HANDHELD console game comes with a stand to play the game then the Developer is doing it wrong.

Also, honestly, who cares about multiplayer balance in a Kid Icarus game?

I didn't even know it HAD multiplayer? >_>

If you had been paying the slightest passive attention, you would have known that Nintendo had been pushing Kid Icarus's online multiplayer as a key feature.

Weird. I wonder why. Seems like an odd thing to focus on, its not like KI screams multiplayer.

That just seems to get slapped on everything these days.

SuperTrainStationH:

harvz:
I haven't played the game but would it not be easier to completely change the control scheme to something like every fps/tps on console and ditch the scheme which requires a plastic stand?...

There is no scheme which requires the stand.

In my experience the stand is useful and comfortable IN GENERAL when I happen to be at home playing at a table, which I often do, but that would apply equally to if I were playing any other game or any other portable system like the PSP for instance.

In any case, the controls for uprising don't bother me, and neither did Metroid Prime Hunters which was praised for its controls at the time if I remember correctly.

Nope. About the only complaint about Metroid Prime Hunters IS the control scheme. Difference is that game came free with the DS in demo THEN in full form so it didn't really feel like a 'real release' at that point.

This game charges for $40 and hands you a stand basically saying, "Yo I heard you don't like carpal tunnel. Use this pal." What they should have done was use the complaints about MP: Hunters' controls and fixed the problem when they were told 6 years ago the first time.

Right...says the company including a large plastic device to play a handheld game easier.

Wait, let me get this straight...Nintendo comes out and says "this is the best control scheme we could come up with for this game, because the other two were impossible to add and easier to use but less responsive, respectively. This is why we didn't add the latter as an option. Here's how you can make it more comfortable."

And that somehow translates to "ur doin' it wrong?"

I don't think the problem here is with the button assignment. We've all see this one-hand setup work just fine with plenty of other games, as has been pointed out by those before me. If anything, the issue is with the software's response to the stylus movement, though I don't know if I even agree with that. I wonder if Nintendo would have gotten all this flak if they hadn't included the stand at all. This setup worked with Starfox DS, Metroid Hunters, and plenty others. I think people are pouncing on the aftermath of Zero Punctuation.

I love the way you're expected to just sit there holding a stylus in the middle of the screen for hours on end. Unless Japanese train rides have gotten any shorter (again, assuming it's even possible to play without that stupid stand).

I'm left-handed and have no problem with the controls, and I don't even have a Circle Pad Pro. Hell, they so don't bother me that it's still my game of the year. This is almost an identical scheme to Metroid Prime Hunters, which no one had a problem with. Could it be the fact that people are bitching for the sake of bitching due to this being a high-profile game or... dare I say it, parroting Yahtzee?

You're not endearing yourself to the Croshaw by bleating his opinions, people. This "I'm disillusioned because I never grew up with Nintendo" and "IT COMES WITH A STAND" junk - let's face it, are you guys saying that because you actually agree with it or because Yahtzee said it?

144:
...I think people are pouncing on the aftermath of Zero Punctuation.

I think a few people watch Jimquisition and Zero Punctuation as a substitute for forming their own opinion on anything and act as though whatever they say in their videos constitute infallible statements.

And then there those who go nuts whenever they say something they disagree with and start running around with their internet pitch forks of textual outrage.

wintercoat:

SAMAS:

Byere:
So, if ZP's review is anything to go by, you need to move with the control pad/analog stick, pretty shoulder buttons and/or normal buttons AND use the stylus.

Now, forgive my ignorance having neither a 3DS or ever playing one (though having a normal DS), but that means controlling the pad with your left hand and the buttons/stylus with your right hand, correct?
Well I have one thing to say about that. Screw you, I'm left handed and cannot draw or use the stylus with my right hand. I'm not ambidextrous either. So sod off "Mr. Developer" for telling me YOUR control scheme is in the right and I'd be in the wrong for playing a game you created.

Ah, no. You move with the analog stick, fire with the L button (R if you're left-handed and have the 2nd stick accessory), aim with the stylus. It works fine. The problem is that it puts all of the 3DS' weight on one wrist, and the 3DS is noticeably heavier than the DS Lite/i. After a while (usually within the time it takes to complete a stage or two), you start to feel the strain.

The 3DS is ~20 grams(~3/4ths of an ounce) heavier than the DS Lite and DSi, and 40 grams(~1.5 ounces) lighter than the beast of a handheld that was the original DS. I don't remember anyone complaining about sore wrists with all of the games that used the D-pad/face buttons and the shoulder buttons while requiring extensive use of the stylus. Phantom Hourglass anyone? Metroid Prime: Hunters? You plop the DS on your pinky, cradle it between the pad of your thumb and your middle and ring finger, use your thumb for the D-pad/face buttons/circle pad, and your pointer for the shoulder button. The only problems arise if you've got really small or really big hands.

And yet my wrist usually hurts after a round or two of Uprising, which makes me think there may be some merit to Sakurai's claims of needing a lighter touch.

Samus Aaron:

I would not have titled it, because this story does not even deserve to be published at all. It is not news. It doesn't tell us anything we can't figure out for ourselves, or that we don't know already.

Look at the source of this article, which is provided at the bottom of the story. (http://uk.ds.ign.com/articles/122/1224194p1.html). Notice how the Escapist article reports only a small snippet - and not even a very important one at that - of what is in fact a larger and more comprehensive interview about Kid Icarus Uprising in general. So the author sifts through all of this information, and what does he choose? A harmless suggestion by Sakurai about a few ways that players can play their game if they want a more enjoyable experience. And of course, the author turns it into "Nintendo (the entire company, rather than just Sakurai) says you're (appeal to the reader's emotions by making it about YOU) playing Kid Icarus Uprising wrong (where, tell me, WHERE is the word 'wrong' in the interview?)."

Notice that the explanation for 'why' Sakurai says what he says is given in the article itself. But just take a look at the comments on this article* - judging by the number of people who express outrage at "Nintendo telling them they are wrong" and little else, the vast majority of people seem to have taken one look at the title and gone straight to the comments. Those little details for 'why' a different control scheme was unfeasible don't seem to have mattered to the readers of the article - they fall to the periphery while the outrage takes center focus, and who can blame them? The title of the article tells readers how to feel before they even know what they're reading; in other words, this story has been spun. It is, for lack of a better word, sensationalism.

So to answer your question, assuming that this article even deserves to be written, I would have titled it "In Defense of Kid Icarus Uprising's Controls: Director Masahiro Sakurai responds to critics and even compares Pit's adventure to Super Smash Bros." See, that's impartial, and actually prepares us for what we're about to read.

You may have noticed that this title is the same as the title of IGN's parent article. That's because IGN posted the real story - unlike this spun article, which, were it not for the unfitting title, would have actually been a relatively fair read.

*For comparison, look at the comments on IGN's article. Notice how their comments are generally about their annoyance with the controls, rather than about their outrage at Nintendo's audacity to tell them that they're "playing it wrong." Even more evidence that this story has been spun.

By your own argument, the title of the article puts people in a certain mind set. I can get on board with that. However, I would also argue that IGN's article does the exact same thing, in fact, I would argue that ANY title does that. I say this not out of spite, though it will probably seem that way... But ANY time that Super Smash Brothers is mentioned Nintendo fans generally think "GREAT GAME" and drawing a comparison between the two games doesn't really seem straight up to me because then they are comparing it to all the good things about Smash Bros. I could be wrong, but I'm pretty ok with that, it has happened before.

I was not meaning to imply that the escapist was 100% right or wrong either way. I apologize if that's how I came across. I think though that for people who are/were upset about the controls, that quote IS the crux of the article. I understand that they wanted a different control set up and they went with what they thought was best, but it still stunk for a lot of people. And then those people were essentially told "Quit squeezing it too hard, that's not how it was meant to be played" as an acknowledgement of their issues which is pretty weak.

This is further exacerbated, for me personally at least, by what I perceive to be arrogance on his part. It's almost as if he is saying "Yeah, Smash Brothers got some shit too, but I was proved right in the end. So do the same thing they did...Sit down, shut up, play, and get used to the controls."

To sum up: Yes, this article gives a slanted view of the interview, and does focus on the quote w/o a lot of context. However that doesn't mean that the quote is harmless, especially if you're on the of people who were irked or upset by the default controls.

-Cheers

crazyarms33:

Samus Aaron:

I would not have titled it, because this story does not even deserve to be published at all. It is not news. It doesn't tell us anything we can't figure out for ourselves, or that we don't know already.

Look at the source of this article, which is provided at the bottom of the story. (http://uk.ds.ign.com/articles/122/1224194p1.html). Notice how the Escapist article reports only a small snippet - and not even a very important one at that - of what is in fact a larger and more comprehensive interview about Kid Icarus Uprising in general. So the author sifts through all of this information, and what does he choose? A harmless suggestion by Sakurai about a few ways that players can play their game if they want a more enjoyable experience. And of course, the author turns it into "Nintendo (the entire company, rather than just Sakurai) says you're (appeal to the reader's emotions by making it about YOU) playing Kid Icarus Uprising wrong (where, tell me, WHERE is the word 'wrong' in the interview?)."

Notice that the explanation for 'why' Sakurai says what he says is given in the article itself. But just take a look at the comments on this article* - judging by the number of people who express outrage at "Nintendo telling them they are wrong" and little else, the vast majority of people seem to have taken one look at the title and gone straight to the comments. Those little details for 'why' a different control scheme was unfeasible don't seem to have mattered to the readers of the article - they fall to the periphery while the outrage takes center focus, and who can blame them? The title of the article tells readers how to feel before they even know what they're reading; in other words, this story has been spun. It is, for lack of a better word, sensationalism.

So to answer your question, assuming that this article even deserves to be written, I would have titled it "In Defense of Kid Icarus Uprising's Controls: Director Masahiro Sakurai responds to critics and even compares Pit's adventure to Super Smash Bros." See, that's impartial, and actually prepares us for what we're about to read.

You may have noticed that this title is the same as the title of IGN's parent article. That's because IGN posted the real story - unlike this spun article, which, were it not for the unfitting title, would have actually been a relatively fair read.

*For comparison, look at the comments on IGN's article. Notice how their comments are generally about their annoyance with the controls, rather than about their outrage at Nintendo's audacity to tell them that they're "playing it wrong." Even more evidence that this story has been spun.

By your own argument, the title of the article puts people in a certain mind set. I can get on board with that. However, I would also argue that IGN's article does the exact same thing, in fact, I would argue that ANY title does that. I say this not out of spite, though it will probably seem that way... But ANY time that Super Smash Brothers is mentioned Nintendo fans generally think "GREAT GAME" and drawing a comparison between the two games doesn't really seem straight up to me because then they are comparing it to all the good things about Smash Bros. I could be wrong, but I'm pretty ok with that, it has happened before.

I was not meaning to imply that the escapist was 100% right or wrong either way. I apologize if that's how I came across. I think though that for people who are/were upset about the controls, that quote IS the crux of the article. I understand that they wanted a different control set up and they went with what they thought was best, but it still stunk for a lot of people. And then those people were essentially told "Quit squeezing it too hard, that's not how it was meant to be played" as an acknowledgement of their issues which is pretty weak.

This is further exacerbated, for me personally at least, by what I perceive to be arrogance on his part. It's almost as if he is saying "Yeah, Smash Brothers got some shit too, but I was proved right in the end. So do the same thing they did...Sit down, shut up, play, and get used to the controls."

To sum up: Yes, this article gives a slanted view of the interview, and does focus on the quote w/o a lot of context. However that doesn't mean that the quote is harmless, especially if you're on the of people who were irked or upset by the default controls.

-Cheers

I can see how Sakurai's quote does suggest some degree of arrogance - it can definitely be interpreted as a "Suck it up and play it right" statement. My frustration with this article is not that it addresses this legitimate concern, but that the author puts this particular part of the interview out front and center in the title, making it the focus of the article. If Sakurai's comment is indeed arrogant and therefore deserves attention, it is not the reporter's responsibility to point that out; readers should be able to judge that for themselves.

And even if I can excuse the author for doing this, I can't get past the fact that the title doesn't even mention an actual quote, but it can be easily construed as one by people who neglect to read a little more into the story.

Anyway, I don't mean to slam the Escapist in general or to blithely support IGN (which I don't even frequent), or vice-versa, I just wanted to call out this particular article. Although I wouldn't have really felt the need to chastise this article if I hadn't noticed a trend in this kind of reporting before. That said, it's an infrequent problem.

The controls are easily the worst parts of the game, and I'll say that even though I've adapted to them (Multiplayer teaches you pretty quickly).

The main change I would have made is including something like a thumb-dot-stylus, instead of that useless chunk of plastic that shipped with the game.

(For once, I cannot see a second analog stick working here. the game is pretty fast, and the stylus allows for exceptionally quick AIMING...just not for turning the whole camera, you really have to anticipate where your target is going).

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