NASA Compiles Stunning Transit of Venus Video

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NASA Compiles Stunning Transit of Venus Video

See a rare planetary phenomenon without burning your eyeballs.

Astrophysicist and well-known badass Neil deGrasse Tyson once calculated that you could cook a 16" pepperoni pizza in nine seconds on the surface of Venus. For what it's worth, the sun could similarly cook Venus - about 1,443,000 of it at once, if need be. These two galactic hotbeds converged in a rare cosmic ballet on June 5, 2012 when observers on Earth observed the transit of Venus across the sun. Using terabytes upon terabytes of photographs and videos, NASA compiled a video of the event, showing the sun's radiance across a spectrum of colors and Venus as a haunting, ephemeral silhouette.

As far as the video goes, it's probably just better to watch it, as no description could really do it justice. Against a dramatic orchestral backdrop, NASA shows Venus moving across the sun in its various spectra: a stately yellow, a fiery orange, and a subdued purple. If you wanted to see the transit of Venus without burning your eyes out or constructing a rudimentary projection device, this is about as good as it gets.

The transit of Venus occurs in eight-year pairs once every 105 or 121 years, depending on the relative positions of Venus and Earth. This means that while the last transit took place in 2004, the next one will not occur until 2117. Unless you have plans to live substantially longer than any human being in history, this video will be about as close as you get to seeing this planetary phenomenon again. Not to worry, though: If you're keen on catching astronomical oddities, there will be a total solar eclipse on November 13, 2012. You'll have to be in the southern Pacific Ocean or a narrow stretch of northern Australia to see it, of course, but chances are that NASA will catalogue that one, too.

Source: NASAexplorer

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An eclipse, the Cosmic ballet goes on.

that was pretty awesome

I wonder, do they make those pictures in 1080p? would definitely consider adding that glorious yellow one into my desktop slideshow

Stil..*shudders* it could've been just me, but DAMNNN, it was flippin hot as shit outside when venus was crossing paths with the sun, I don't think i've ever tanned so fast in my life.

Marshall Honorof:
If you wanted to see the transit of Venus without burning your eyes out or constructing a rudimentary projection device, this is about as good as it gets.

*Note : I am still struggling to cope with my rage and bitter disappointment as I type this. I am not usually a monkeyape of Furious AngerTM.*

THIS HAPPENS TO NOT BE ENTIRELY ACCURATE.

See, some of us would have liked to point our telescopes at the sun. Perhaps SOME OF US would have put their NEW AND EXPENSIVE SOLAR FILTER on their telescopes. THEN MAYBE SOME OF US MIGHT HAVE WATCHED THE TRANSIT LIVE, WITH OUR OWN EYES AND WITH GLORIOUS MAGNIFICATION, THE LAST HUMANS TO DO SO FOR OVER A CENTURY.

IT IS, IN FACT, ENTIRELY POSSIBLE THAT SOME OF US STAYED AWAKE ALL NIGHT, DESPERATELY CHECKING THE EASTERN HORIZON, WAITING FOR THE SUNRISE.

image

Of course, living in Scotland, asking that a June day not be foggy, cloudy, and pissing rain

ON THE DAY OF AN EVENT I WILL NOT EVER VIEW AGAIN IN A LIFETIME OF ASTRONOMY

was frankly preposterous.

image

Fin.

As a libra (and probably just someone who appreciates astronomy/science), I think this is awesome stuff.

Particularly liked all the various angles and methods of filming the sun that were used~

Oh man, I am so close to living in that part of Australia where the solar eclipse is happening. I got all excited, but then no, not quite, no eclipse for me.

Maybe I can still catch, you know, most of the eclipse. That would be cool.

Wow...

That was beautiful enough to almost make me shed a tear.

Thanks for sharing.

Now they don't have to send people into space, their media budget has significantly improved.

I watched it from home. All I did was put on three pairs of sunglasses and then took to staring at the sun. I'm lucky I have good eyesight, because my sister couldn't see it at all.

The sun was bright as fuck, I'll say that much. Worth it.

Octorok:
Fin.

So you are blaming something that nobody can control for not seeing the event? The weather.

Edit: Scotland's weather at that. As a fellow Scot, I laugh at you thinking it was going to be anything other than rain, clouds and/or snow on a day when you actually want to look at the sky ;)

OT: I love stuff like this. Too bad I didn't know about it until the day after :(

Uhhh.... not seeing why this is generating so much interest, really... It's kinda boring to watch a little black dot sweeping across the sun. I would much rather be watching some high res video of the sun itself alone? Shrug.

Pedro The Hutt:
As a libra (and probably just someone who appreciates astronomy/science), I think this is awesome stuff.

Particularly liked all the various angles and methods of filming the sun that were used~

What has being a libra have to do with astronomy/science ? Have you also taken the Polar Shift into account ? You might not even be Libra.

O.T I'm glad I was able to see it :D

Yosharian:
Uhhh.... not seeing why this is generating so much interest, really... It's kinda boring to watch a little black dot sweeping across the sun. I would much rather be watching some high res video of the sun itself alone? Shrug.

It's just the fact that the next one will be in 2117, so we kinda got a big chance to be able to see it.

there is something wrong with it.

it appears as if the venus gets a pattern/hatching/shading when it 'touches' the sun. look closely.

optical illusion?

Yosharian:
Uhhh.... not seeing why this is generating so much interest, really... It's kinda boring to watch a little black dot sweeping across the sun. I would much rather be watching some high res video of the sun itself alone? Shrug.

Because some people have a sense of History? Following in the footsteps of Mason and Dixon or the Great Navigator himself James Cook is plenty enough reason for me to have made a primitive magnifying camera obscura. Hell this is only the 8th time the transit has been observable.

RustlessPotato:

Yosharian:
Uhhh.... not seeing why this is generating so much interest, really... It's kinda boring to watch a little black dot sweeping across the sun. I would much rather be watching some high res video of the sun itself alone? Shrug.

It's just the fact that the next one will be in 2117, so we kinda got a big chance to be able to see it.

octafish:

Yosharian:
Uhhh.... not seeing why this is generating so much interest, really... It's kinda boring to watch a little black dot sweeping across the sun. I would much rather be watching some high res video of the sun itself alone? Shrug.

Because some people have a sense of History? Following in the footsteps of Mason and Dixon or the Great Navigator himself James Cook is plenty enough reason for me to have made a primitive magnifying camera obscura. Hell this is only the 8th time the transit has been observable.

I know all that, but the fact that it's a rare event doesn't automatically make it worth gawping over in my book, that's all I'm saying.

Absolutely humbling. Pretty sure there isn't anything else i can say about this.

rhizhim:
there is something wrong with it.

it appears as if the venus gets a pattern/hatching/shading when it 'touches' the sun. look closely.

optical illusion?

If I remember from basic astronomy, that is refraction from the suns rays on Venus'es atmosphere. This effect is used quite often to find the components of the atmosphere. They were using it this time for that to.

Gotta love the religion argument in the comments, youtube never fails to impress me.

I don't think I blinked. I'm still in awe after watching it twice.

imnotparanoid:
Gotta love the religion argument in the comments, youtube never fails to impress me.

It's even worse than the usual Youtube comments, because now everyone's acting high and mighty, thinking they're intelligent for doubting God or believing in God or whatever they want to believe in. Pretentious is what it is.

Octorok:
Fin.

Ugh, that sucks, man. I'm in NYC, so unless I wanted to take a day off and drive out of town or get on the roof of the Empire State Building and build a projector, I was out of luck. My only real recommendation would be to check out NASA's eclipse site and use your fancy telescope for the next phenomenon in town: http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/eclipse.html

Or flee to a very, very sunny part of the world. I find that unless I am vacationing there, it rarely rains in Arizona (but if I go, expect it to pour until I leave).

Pedro The Hutt:
As a libra (and probably just someone who appreciates astronomy/science), I think this is awesome stuff.

Particularly liked all the various angles and methods of filming the sun that were used~

I'm a Taurus, proud to have Venus as my sign's ruling planet, and I love astronomy and science as well. It makes one feel so small to witness these kinds of things when they happen.

Truly the universe is a mysterious and wonderful place that we're all lucky to belong to :)

gmaverick019:
that was pretty awesome

I wonder, do they make those pictures in 1080p? would definitely consider adding that glorious yellow one into my desktop slideshow

Stil..*shudders* it could've been just me, but DAMNNN, it was flippin hot as shit outside when venus was crossing paths with the sun, I don't think i've ever tanned so fast in my life.

There's a good selection of images here: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a010000/a010900/a010996/index.html

It's hard to not feel emotionally moved when watching that, I had to wipe a tear from my eyes after the video was over.

Thanks to NASA for compiling that video. I appreciated every second of it.

Guys guys guys....lets go to space! No stupid religious debates in space.
SPAAAAAAAAAAAAAACE SPAAAAAAAAAACE!
Okay, with that out of my system, I'm glad that was posted to youtube. Sad that people argue science vs. religion, but I ignored it and watched it over and over again. Kind of cool knowing how small we really are.

paulgruberman:

gmaverick019:
that was pretty awesome

I wonder, do they make those pictures in 1080p? would definitely consider adding that glorious yellow one into my desktop slideshow

Stil..*shudders* it could've been just me, but DAMNNN, it was flippin hot as shit outside when venus was crossing paths with the sun, I don't think i've ever tanned so fast in my life.

There's a good selection of images here: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a010000/a010900/a010996/index.html

Thanks for that link, I'm definitely grabbing a couple of those.

(not to mention, it's like a real life yellowish spirit bomb, who wouldn't want an awesome picture of that?!?)

Well I'm sure feeling small today.

Also google VY Canis Majoras to have yourself a laugh.

Well that's just damn cool.

rhizhim:
there is something wrong with it.

it appears as if the venus gets a pattern/hatching/shading when it 'touches' the sun. look closely.

optical illusion?

Atmospheric refraction and camera focus.

Don't have an observatory near you?

Now you too can watch the stunning dot move across the face of the sun!

Can i get a good zoom in on the mound of venus?

imnotparanoid:
Gotta love the religion argument in the comments, youtube never fails to impress me.

Have they brought up Nazis yet? Shit! did I invoke Godwins Law?

Octorok:

Marshall Honorof:
If you wanted to see the transit of Venus without burning your eyes out or constructing a rudimentary projection device, this is about as good as it gets.

*Note : I am still struggling to cope with my rage and bitter disappointment as I type this. I am not usually a monkeyape of Furious AngerTM.*

THIS HAPPENS TO NOT BE ENTIRELY ACCURATE.

See, some of us would have liked to point our telescopes at the sun. Perhaps SOME OF US would have put their NEW AND EXPENSIVE SOLAR FILTER on their telescopes. THEN MAYBE SOME OF US MIGHT HAVE WATCHED THE TRANSIT LIVE, WITH OUR OWN EYES AND WITH GLORIOUS MAGNIFICATION, THE LAST HUMANS TO DO SO FOR OVER A CENTURY.

IT IS, IN FACT, ENTIRELY POSSIBLE THAT SOME OF US STAYED AWAKE ALL NIGHT, DESPERATELY CHECKING THE EASTERN HORIZON, WAITING FOR THE SUNRISE.

image

Of course, living in Scotland, asking that a June day not be foggy, cloudy, and pissing rain

ON THE DAY OF AN EVENT I WILL NOT EVER VIEW AGAIN IN A LIFETIME OF ASTRONOMY

was frankly preposterous.

image

Fin.

image

Your rage and the eloquence in which you describe it is impressive; and hilarious. I am sorry that you missed the chance, though.

To be honest, I don't think the video is that impressive. Sure, it's amazing that it's a once in a lifetime thing, but...

It's just a circle moving across another circle. It's not like an eclipse where the entire light is blotted out, there's not enough time to see the movement of plasma accross the surface of the sun, and so on.

I find the religion debate happening on the youtube comments much more amusing.

But yes, this is so awesome.

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