More Sophisticated Games May Follow PEGI Enforcement

More Sophisticated Games May Follow PEGI Enforcement

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Cracking down on sales to minors may allow more mature titles to flourish.

Now that the UK can legally enforce PEGI ratings on videogames, the entertainment market in Great Britain might start looking a little different. While stricter ratings might have some negative effects on retailers, UKIE - the Association for UK Interactive Entertainment - believes that stricter ratings will confer some benefits, too. In addition to getting parents more involved in their children's gaming lives, UKIE hopes that by more carefully delineating the lines between children and adult entertainment, developers will feel more comfortable making riskier games for a more mature audience.

"We're a sophisticated entertainment medium," explains Jo Twist, UKIE's CEO. "Just like any other sophisticated media like films, TV, whatever, you have content that is made for maturer audiences." Twist believes that the UK tends to look down on many popular games for their violent content, but believes that a clear, enforceable ratings system will help solidify games for kids and games for adults as two very discrete parts of a whole medium. "Hopefully, we will have done enough education and enough showing the positive sides of games so that this furor and this natural cultural bias doesn't happen anymore."

Beyond free expression, Twist states that there is another benefit to a detailed ratings system: parental involvement. "[We] found that a quarter of the parents never play games with their kids, which is actually surprisingly low as well," she says. "We encourage them to play as a family, to explore games, because they are, as we know, a fantastic form of entertainment for everyone." Of course, PEGI's new status also makes it easier to buy games for the right age bracket (or, more accurately, more difficult to buy games for the wrong one). If you want to buy a game rated 12, 16, or 18 and don't look your age, you'll have to prove it; if not, a retailer might have to shell out 5000 or even face jail time.

Whether the elimination of BBFC ratings on videogames and stricter retail law will actually encourage parents to check ratings and engage in dialogues with their children has yet to be seen, but if Twist is correct, the next few years could be a very exciting time for UK developers. However, if parents gaming with their children while adults play a slew of rich, grown-up games sounds too utopian, don't worry; odds are that someone, somewhere will still find a way to get angry about it.

Source: Eurogamer

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Yeah, that'll certainly make parents give a shit about what they get their children.

Parents buy adult games for their children, thus defeating the arguement. Nothing can keep mature content out of the hands of minors who are determined or have the means to get it.

I doubt if it will for the rather simple reason the UK market isn't big enough to develop anything other than an indy title.

albino boo:
I doubt if it will for the rather simple reason the UK market isn't big enough to develop anything other than an indy title.

Yes. Exactly what the miniature giant space hampster said. Still this is a step towards more games for adults and less for teen boys. Maybe.

I'm not sure parents will even know about the fact that ratings are now legally enforced. I bet there's a significant number who don't even know what those numbers mean.

I also don't think that games are viewed with such disdain here in the UK. It seems it's only The Daily Mail who wants to spin sensationalist stories about how evil they are. But in other places they are pretty well respected. They have their own BAFTAs, Peter Molyneux has an OBE and video game reviews even get their own sections in several broadsheet newspapers like The Guardian and The Independent.

More sophisticated games, you say?

Indeed.

Marshall Honorof:
However, if parents gaming with their children while adults play a slew of rich, grown-up games sounds too utopian, don't worry; odds are that someone, somewhere will still find a way to get angry about it.

As wonderful as the system sounds, this is an inevitability. Mostly because there will always be a lazy parent out there that will fuck up, and than the uptight-stickintheass parent will somehow get involved and "oh look! we're back right where we started."

Sorry lady, but this change isn't actually going to change anything.

Move along, nothing to see here.

This seems all well and good until you start defining what makes an adult game. And then you have to take into account publishers that don't want their games sold alongside adult rated titles. It's pretty much how Nintendo pushed the already obscure adult game market out of brick and mortar stores. At least that's how I recall it. I may b wrong on a few details. But it does pose a possible problem for the retailers themselves. Ultimately, we're still going to just get the same old crap from the same old developers, and it isn't likely to change anytime soon. Games aren't stagnant because they're afraid of parental backlash. They're stagnant because publishers are too chicken shit to take a risk on anything fresh and interesting... With a few exceptions I won't care to list. Those who know what they are, feel free to insert reasons why I'm wrong. Please? I'm not calling anyone out, just trying to wrap my head around it.

Sadly,the rating system only works if people pay attention to it, and legalizing it will only punish retailers, so there's probably going to be even less market for "adult games".

Besides, publishers don't want to sell AO games, a legal enforcement is not going to change that

octafish:

albino boo:
I doubt if it will for the rather simple reason the UK market isn't big enough to develop anything other than an indy title.

Yes. Exactly what the miniature giant space hampster said. Still this is a step towards more games for adults and less for teen boys. Maybe.

Butt kicking for goodness! I hope that the industry can get away from the bro-shooters and zombie madness and produce something a little more mature. A game that deals with sex like an art house movie instead of look at the boobies, or deals with violence in the manner of the Sopranos rather than the average Arnie Schwarzenegger movie.

albino boo:
I doubt if it will for the rather simple reason the UK market isn't big enough to develop anything other than an indy title.

The UK Market has some of the best game developers out there;

Codemasters
Creative Assembly
Criterion
Eidos
Eurocom (Dead Space makers)
Jagex (Runescape makers)
Lionhead
Media Molecule (LittleBigPlanet)
Rare
Rocksteady (Batman Arkham Asylum/City)
Ruffian (Crackdown 2)
Team 17 (Worms)
Traveller's Tales

OT: This isn't going to change a thing, parents will still buy mature games for their bratty kids who want to play the latest games, despite the big red box on the game clearly saying it's an 18 or orange box saying its a 16. Then they will blame the games industry when their kids become violent/addicted to games/whatever other reason it is.

Any shop that sells games needs to clearly ask when anybody buys a game with a 12+ rating on it whether they are buying it for someone younger to play. If they are, don't sell it to them.
While this may sound unfair, a majority of the time people are going to be buying games for themselves/as a present for a friend/family member, but when a Mum or Dad comes into store and tries to buy the latest violent title then the person who's selling it needs to stop and think.

Riku'sTwilight:

albino boo:
I doubt if it will for the rather simple reason the UK market isn't big enough to develop anything other than an indy title.

The UK Market has some of the best game developers out there;

Codemasters
Creative Assembly
Criterion
Eidos
Eurocom (Dead Space makers)
Jagex (Runescape makers)
Lionhead
Media Molecule (LittleBigPlanet)
Rare
Rocksteady (Batman Arkham Asylum/City)
Ruffian (Crackdown 2)
Team 17 (Worms)
Traveller's Tales

OT: This isn't going to change a thing, parents will still buy mature games for their bratty kids who want to play the latest games, despite the big red box on the game clearly saying it's an 18 or orange box saying its a 16. Then they will blame the games industry when their kids become violent/addicted to games/whatever other reason it is.

Any shop that sells games needs to clearly ask when anybody buys a game with a 12+ rating on it whether they are buying it for someone younger to play. If they are, don't sell it to them.
While this may sound unfair, a majority of the time people are going to be buying games for themselves/as a present for a friend/family member, but when a Mum or Dad comes into store and tries to buy the latest violent title then the person who's selling it needs to stop and think.

Just how many of them those studios sell to the UK market only? All those studios make games to sell to the global market and not just the UK. If you spent 30 million making a game that would sell in the UK only you couldn't make your money back.

albino boo:
I doubt if it will for the rather simple reason the UK market isn't big enough to develop anything other than an indy title.

Rockstar north ring a bell.The guys who made the obscure indie darlings known as the GTA games.

OT:Maybe he has a point but since the whole world doesn't have this system I cant see much changing.

I'm confused...I thought the difference between games for adults and games for children was clear enough. Adult games have a big BBFC 18 certificate on the front. What's so difficult to understand about that?

paislyabmj:

albino boo:
I doubt if it will for the rather simple reason the UK market isn't big enough to develop anything other than an indy title.

Rockstar north ring a bell.The guys who made the obscure indie darlings known as the GTA games.

OT:Maybe he has a point but since the whole world doesn't have this system I cant see much changing.

Yawn try looking at the post above yours

albino boo:

Riku'sTwilight:

albino boo:
I doubt if it will for the rather simple reason the UK market isn't big enough to develop anything other than an indy title.

The UK Market has some of the best game developers out there;

Codemasters
Creative Assembly
Criterion
Eidos
Eurocom (Dead Space makers)
Jagex (Runescape makers)
Lionhead
Media Molecule (LittleBigPlanet)
Rare
Rocksteady (Batman Arkham Asylum/City)
Ruffian (Crackdown 2)
Team 17 (Worms)
Traveller's Tales

OT: This isn't going to change a thing, parents will still buy mature games for their bratty kids who want to play the latest games, despite the big red box on the game clearly saying it's an 18 or orange box saying its a 16. Then they will blame the games industry when their kids become violent/addicted to games/whatever other reason it is.

Any shop that sells games needs to clearly ask when anybody buys a game with a 12+ rating on it whether they are buying it for someone younger to play. If they are, don't sell it to them.
While this may sound unfair, a majority of the time people are going to be buying games for themselves/as a present for a friend/family member, but when a Mum or Dad comes into store and tries to buy the latest violent title then the person who's selling it needs to stop and think.

Just how many of them those studios sell to the UK market only? All those studios make games to sell to the global market and not just the UK. If you spent 30 million making a game that would sell in the UK only you couldn't make your money back.

Fuck me you dudes are pessimistic. Hasn't anyone considered that this MIGHT become a trend in other regions? It's not completely out of the realms of possibility that this could be adopted in North America, the rest of Europe, Australia etc. Difficult? Yes. Unlikely? Probably. But for fuck sake, give it a chance.
No wonder everything stays the same in this culture, everyone just falls to the ground and rolls around complaining how nothing's going to change, letting rich twats and mouth-breathers make all the decisions for you.
I'm marking a vote of optimism for this, since no one else is willing to. Shit, who knows, maybe something good might come of it, doubt much bad can.

5-0:
I'm confused...I thought the difference between games for adults and games for children was clear enough. Adult games have a big BBFC 18 certificate on the front. What's so difficult to understand about that?

Exactly. The PEGI has replaced the BBFC. Nothing has changed. PEGI ratings were given the same legal status as the BBFC ratings so this could happen. Whoever wrote this article missed this completely.

albino boo:
I doubt if it will for the rather simple reason the UK market isn't big enough to develop anything other than an indy title.

*cough* grand theft auto *cought*

hudsonzero:

albino boo:
I doubt if it will for the rather simple reason the UK market isn't big enough to develop anything other than an indy title.

*cough* grand theft auto *cought*
Cough cough read the thread

albino boo:

paislyabmj:

Rockstar north ring a bell.The guys who made the obscure indie darlings known as the GTA games.

OT:Maybe he has a point but since the whole world doesn't have this system I cant see much changing.

Yawn try looking at the post above yours

albino boo:

The UK Market has some of the best game developers out there;

Codemasters
Creative Assembly
Criterion
Eidos
Eurocom (Dead Space makers)
Jagex (Runescape makers)
Lionhead
Media Molecule (LittleBigPlanet)
Rare
Rocksteady (Batman Arkham Asylum/City)
Ruffian (Crackdown 2)
Team 17 (Worms)
Traveller's Tales

OT: This isn't going to change a thing, parents will still buy mature games for their bratty kids who want to play the latest games, despite the big red box on the game clearly saying it's an 18 or orange box saying its a 16. Then they will blame the games industry when their kids become violent/addicted to games/whatever other reason it is.

Any shop that sells games needs to clearly ask when anybody buys a game with a 12+ rating on it whether they are buying it for someone younger to play. If they are, don't sell it to them.
While this may sound unfair, a majority of the time people are going to be buying games for themselves/as a present for a friend/family member, but when a Mum or Dad comes into store and tries to buy the latest violent title then the person who's selling it needs to stop and think.

Just how many of them those studios sell to the UK market only? All those studios make games to sell to the global market and not just the UK. If you spent 30 million making a game that would sell in the UK only you couldn't make your money back.

ScruffyMcBalls:
Fuck me you dudes are pessimistic. Hasn't anyone considered that this MIGHT become a trend in other regions? It's not completely out of the realms of possibility that this could be adopted in North America, the rest of Europe, Australia etc. Difficult? Yes. Unlikely? Probably. But for fuck sake, give it a chance.
No wonder everything stays the same in this culture, everyone just falls to the ground and rolls around complaining how nothing's going to change, letting rich twats and mouth-breathers make all the decisions for you.
I'm marking a vote of optimism for this, since no one else is willing to. Shit, who knows, maybe something good might come of it, doubt much bad can.

In order for your argument of us pessimists are just rolling around whining to hold any water, the things we're whining about would have to not hold any water themselves. In this case where everyone is stating that things won't change from this? They really have a good point. In order for change to happen as far as the content and target audience, the ones making the games would have to... you know... want to make the games. The problem has nothing to do with the rating system. The rating system is just how we get games into the brick and mortar stores. The problem is that developers know that they can pump out remakes and sequels and prequels and re-imaginings and all that other crap that keeps coming out, because that's what people buy. If you want to be optimistic, that is perfectly fine. Power to you if you turn out to be right too. But to blame lack of change on those of us who question things rather than just blindly following is too much. I have less polite things to say on the matter, but I'll keep them to myself.

albino boo:

Riku'sTwilight:

albino boo:
I doubt if it will for the rather simple reason the UK market isn't big enough to develop anything other than an indy title.

The UK Market has some of the best game developers out there;

Codemasters
Creative Assembly
Criterion
Eidos
Eurocom (Dead Space makers)
Jagex (Runescape makers)
Lionhead
Media Molecule (LittleBigPlanet)
Rare
Rocksteady (Batman Arkham Asylum/City)
Ruffian (Crackdown 2)
Team 17 (Worms)
Traveller's Tales

OT: This isn't going to change a thing, parents will still buy mature games for their bratty kids who want to play the latest games, despite the big red box on the game clearly saying it's an 18 or orange box saying its a 16. Then they will blame the games industry when their kids become violent/addicted to games/whatever other reason it is.

Any shop that sells games needs to clearly ask when anybody buys a game with a 12+ rating on it whether they are buying it for someone younger to play. If they are, don't sell it to them.
While this may sound unfair, a majority of the time people are going to be buying games for themselves/as a present for a friend/family member, but when a Mum or Dad comes into store and tries to buy the latest violent title then the person who's selling it needs to stop and think.

Just how many of them those studios sell to the UK market only? All those studios make games to sell to the global market and not just the UK. If you spent 30 million making a game that would sell in the UK only you couldn't make your money back.

I purposely selected the big-named studios for you. I can reel off a list of 'indie darling' UK-based studios if you like?

I don't know of any game company that specifically makes a game for a national market. Surely every game company, no matter how big or small wants to get as much recognition from their games, and the way to do that is to sell it worldwide?

Riku'sTwilight:

I purposely selected the big-named studios for you. I can reel off a list of 'indie darling' UK-based studios if you like?

I don't know of any game company that specifically makes a game for a national market. Surely every game company, no matter how big or small wants to get as much recognition from their games, and the way to do that is to sell it worldwide?

Thank you, that is my point. This article is talking about the changes in the law in the UK only, so any effects would be limited to the UK alone. So the change in law would not make a more adult orientated game any more saleable in the rest of world. UK sales are not large enough to make a reasonable return on a 30 million investment of AAA title. I'm not saying the UK doesn't have developers but the change in law won't make difference to what is made because of the size of the UK market. In future I recommend reading the opening story.

Duckman:

ScruffyMcBalls:
Fuck me you dudes are pessimistic. Hasn't anyone considered that this MIGHT become a trend in other regions? It's not completely out of the realms of possibility that this could be adopted in North America, the rest of Europe, Australia etc. Difficult? Yes. Unlikely? Probably. But for fuck sake, give it a chance.
No wonder everything stays the same in this culture, everyone just falls to the ground and rolls around complaining how nothing's going to change, letting rich twats and mouth-breathers make all the decisions for you.
I'm marking a vote of optimism for this, since no one else is willing to. Shit, who knows, maybe something good might come of it, doubt much bad can.

In order for your argument of us pessimists are just rolling around whining to hold any water, the things we're whining about would have to not hold any water themselves. In this case where everyone is stating that things won't change from this? They really have a good point. In order for change to happen as far as the content and target audience, the ones making the games would have to... you know... want to make the games. The problem has nothing to do with the rating system. The rating system is just how we get games into the brick and mortar stores. The problem is that developers know that they can pump out remakes and sequels and prequels and re-imaginings and all that other crap that keeps coming out, because that's what people buy. If you want to be optimistic, that is perfectly fine. Power to you if you turn out to be right too. But to blame lack of change on those of us who question things rather than just blindly following is too much. I have less polite things to say on the matter, but I'll keep them to myself.

Firstly, I don't want anyone to blindly follow shit, I just want people to perhaps adopt an outlook other than "well, that was some news. Guess it was bad." Perhaps look at things from a neutral perspective for a moment, just for once.
And secondly, you got shit that ain't polite to say, feel free to let loose, I don't mind.

ScruffyMcBalls:

Duckman:

ScruffyMcBalls:
Fuck me you dudes are pessimistic. Hasn't anyone considered that this MIGHT become a trend in other regions? It's not completely out of the realms of possibility that this could be adopted in North America, the rest of Europe, Australia etc. Difficult? Yes. Unlikely? Probably. But for fuck sake, give it a chance.
No wonder everything stays the same in this culture, everyone just falls to the ground and rolls around complaining how nothing's going to change, letting rich twats and mouth-breathers make all the decisions for you.
I'm marking a vote of optimism for this, since no one else is willing to. Shit, who knows, maybe something good might come of it, doubt much bad can.

In order for your argument of us pessimists are just rolling around whining to hold any water, the things we're whining about would have to not hold any water themselves. In this case where everyone is stating that things won't change from this? They really have a good point. In order for change to happen as far as the content and target audience, the ones making the games would have to... you know... want to make the games. The problem has nothing to do with the rating system. The rating system is just how we get games into the brick and mortar stores. The problem is that developers know that they can pump out remakes and sequels and prequels and re-imaginings and all that other crap that keeps coming out, because that's what people buy. If you want to be optimistic, that is perfectly fine. Power to you if you turn out to be right too. But to blame lack of change on those of us who question things rather than just blindly following is too much. I have less polite things to say on the matter, but I'll keep them to myself.

Firstly, I don't want anyone to blindly follow shit, I just want people to perhaps adopt an outlook other than "well, that was some news. Guess it was bad." Perhaps look at things from a neutral perspective for a moment, just for once.
And secondly, you got shit that ain't polite to say, feel free to let loose, I don't mind.

So by what you are saying, you don't want people to follow blindly, but you do want to tell people how they should look at something. A touch of nonsense I do detect in your reasoning.

As for a "neutral perspective", I could argue the vagueness of the term, but what it comes down to is that how your opinion colors a situation is not a matter of conscious effort.

And frankly, I don't give a damn if you mind what I have to say or not. But this isn't the place for stupid bickering, so I'll elect to avoid that where I can. What it all comes down to is that I believe you are wrong in your reasoning, and didn't care for the way you went about voicing it. Whatever I have to say on the matter, I have the right to say and you have the right to respond. Harsh words shouldn't be a major player in that, now should they?

albino boo:

Riku'sTwilight:

I purposely selected the big-named studios for you. I can reel off a list of 'indie darling' UK-based studios if you like?

I don't know of any game company that specifically makes a game for a national market. Surely every game company, no matter how big or small wants to get as much recognition from their games, and the way to do that is to sell it worldwide?

Thank you, that is my point. This article is talking about the changes in the law in the UK only, so any effects would be limited to the UK alone. So the change in law would not make a more adult orientated game any more saleable in the rest of world. UK sales are not large enough to make a reasonable return on a 30 million investment of AAA title. I'm not saying the UK doesn't have developers but the change in law won't make difference to what is made because of the size of the UK market. In future I recommend reading the opening story.

I did read the article, and I'm from the UK so I've been living with the PEGI system for years (and this lawful gaining of the PEGI system has been floating around since it's inception, yet only come into play now for whatever reason)

I was merely confused by your initial point - I doubt if it will for the rather simple reason the UK market isn't big enough to develop anything other than an indy title.

You seemed to be arguing that the UK market can only produce indie titles. Upon further discussion I knew this not to be the case. I am saying that if you'd have said this longer piece above initially then there would have been less confusion and less argument.

I agree with what you are saying though. The UK market isn't big enough to make a dent in a 30 million pound game's profits, and the PEGI law won't make a difference to what is being made

Riku'sTwilight:

albino boo:

Riku'sTwilight:

I purposely selected the big-named studios for you. I can reel off a list of 'indie darling' UK-based studios if you like?

I don't know of any game company that specifically makes a game for a national market. Surely every game company, no matter how big or small wants to get as much recognition from their games, and the way to do that is to sell it worldwide?

Thank you, that is my point. This article is talking about the changes in the law in the UK only, so any effects would be limited to the UK alone. So the change in law would not make a more adult orientated game any more saleable in the rest of world. UK sales are not large enough to make a reasonable return on a 30 million investment of AAA title. I'm not saying the UK doesn't have developers but the change in law won't make difference to what is made because of the size of the UK market. In future I recommend reading the opening story.

I did read the article, and I'm from the UK so I've been living with the PEGI system for years (and this lawful gaining of the PEGI system has been floating around since it's inception, yet only come into play now for whatever reason)

I was merely confused by your initial point - I doubt if it will for the rather simple reason the UK market isn't big enough to develop anything other than an indy title.

You seemed to be arguing that the UK market can only produce indie titles. Upon further discussion I knew this not to be the case. I am saying that if you'd have said this longer piece above initially then there would have been less confusion and less argument.

I agree with what you are saying though. The UK market isn't big enough to make a dent in a 30 million pound game's profits, and the PEGI law won't make a difference to what is being made

Yeah its the way I said the UK MARKET isn't big enough made the meaning really obscure. The guy in the post got the idea quickly.

octafish:

albino boo:
I doubt if it will for the rather simple reason the UK market isn't big enough to develop anything other than an indy title.

Yes. Exactly what the miniature giant space hampster said. Still this is a step towards more games for adults and less for teen boys. Maybe.

Duckman:

ScruffyMcBalls:

Duckman:

In order for your argument of us pessimists are just rolling around whining to hold any water, the things we're whining about would have to not hold any water themselves. In this case where everyone is stating that things won't change from this? They really have a good point. In order for change to happen as far as the content and target audience, the ones making the games would have to... you know... want to make the games. The problem has nothing to do with the rating system. The rating system is just how we get games into the brick and mortar stores. The problem is that developers know that they can pump out remakes and sequels and prequels and re-imaginings and all that other crap that keeps coming out, because that's what people buy. If you want to be optimistic, that is perfectly fine. Power to you if you turn out to be right too. But to blame lack of change on those of us who question things rather than just blindly following is too much. I have less polite things to say on the matter, but I'll keep them to myself.

Firstly, I don't want anyone to blindly follow shit, I just want people to perhaps adopt an outlook other than "well, that was some news. Guess it was bad." Perhaps look at things from a neutral perspective for a moment, just for once.
And secondly, you got shit that ain't polite to say, feel free to let loose, I don't mind.

So by what you are saying, you don't want people to follow blindly, but you do want to tell people how they should look at something. A touch of nonsense I do detect in your reasoning.

As for a "neutral perspective", I could argue the vagueness of the term, but what it comes down to is that how your opinion colors a situation is not a matter of conscious effort.

And frankly, I don't give a damn if you mind what I have to say or not. But this isn't the place for stupid bickering, so I'll elect to avoid that where I can. What it all comes down to is that I believe you are wrong in your reasoning, and didn't care for the way you went about voicing it. Whatever I have to say on the matter, I have the right to say and you have the right to respond. Harsh words shouldn't be a major player in that, now should they?

You make a good point, and I respect that. And personally I don't consider harsh words bickering, more... spices, that add some colour to the occasion.
Either way, you've stood your own, I applaud that.
Oh, and by neutral I mean to remain undecided for longer and take time to consider the facts before aligning yourself either one way or another. It's not something everyone forgets to do, but for a lot of folks, that's the case. And yes, I do believe I want to tell people how to look at something, methods can be taught, opinions can't, I don't want to change the outcome, just how people get there so they get there in a better way.

Riku'sTwilight:

albino boo:
I doubt if it will for the rather simple reason the UK market isn't big enough to develop anything other than an indy title.

Any shop that sells games needs to clearly ask when anybody buys a game with a 12+ rating on it whether they are buying it for someone younger to play. If they are, don't sell it to them.
While this may sound unfair, a majority of the time people are going to be buying games for themselves/as a present for a friend/family member, but when a Mum or Dad comes into store and tries to buy the latest violent title then the person who's selling it needs to stop and think.

While I do agree that some Parent/Children combinations shouldn't be exposed to violent game (mainly the sensationalist parents that freak out over some things), some Parents don't do that, and most kids don't go insane just by playing video games. I'm a firm believer in the philosophy that exposure breeds understanding (obviously within reason, I wouldn't want my kid watching hardcore porn before he was at least 14/15... depends on how mature he is when I come to that bridge), which I take after my Mother. I have very fond memories of playing Resident Evil 2 and GTA London with her when I was younger, as well as watching Pulp Fiction, Resivoir dogs and the like before I was even 10 years old. Heck, one of our favourite films was American Werewolf in London, which was a pretty gory film for its time. Err where am I go with this?

To refocus, I think if the parent doesn't take issue with the things being presented and the child it mature enough to get it, I don't see a problem buying older games for a kid, obviously with in a reasonable margin. But I think that if you explain things to a child it's much better than just going "NO NO ITS WRONG AND EVIL NO NO!" "Why?" says little Timmy, "BECAUSE IT IS DON'T DO IT NO!" He's just going to be more attracted to it. So yeah, other people shouldn't have to be neutered because some people kick up a fuss and ruin it for the rest of us.

Captcha: Lumpy Gravy, hmm, apparently the escapist AI is a Frank Zappa fan. Oh the horror, a computer powered by the songs of Frank Zappa.

 

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