Today's Youth Unimpressed With Commodore 64

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It sounds to me that the Commodore 64 was demoed in the most boring way possible. Of course kids today are not going to be impressed by the graphics and the ludicrously long load times for a game. Show them that you can write your own game and change it to be anything you want (which consoles do not offer) and they might be impressed.

a slight correction for the article.

the next system after the c-64 was the generation of amiga and atari-st. now the amiga was a damn good system

Show them an Amiga and it's floppies, that'll totally blow them away. Or at least it won't kill them of boredom.

I have fond memories of my dear Amiga, I already had an NES and a SNES back then, but I still prefered to play with my dear Amiga, it was quite special... until my dad sold it D:

I still have tons and tons of floppies for the Amiga laying around, waiting to be used again someday...

kids today can go straight to hell. The commodore 64 is amazing.

Kids today are unimpressed with one of the oldest gaming systems on the market? What a shock!

And honestly, the quality of a console or game doesn't change over time (unless you're in today's market, ever adding more DLC). It's just that you have more things to compare it too and, hopefully, the newer stuff is better made.

Hopefully.

God I wish I could get a chance to play that just for the history.

Wow, those graphics look pretty good for the time. A lot better than the first games I played on my 286, years later than that.

He would have been better off taking a Spectrum instead of a C64.

Then he could have showed them School Daze, Rockstar Ate My Hamster or How to be a Complete Bastard

My fist computer was a IBM PS/2 386 in 1987, I missed out on the 8-bit computer era. Though I did have an Atari 2600 and NES.

Zhukov:
The guy was seriously expecting them to be impressed?

I mean, why would they be?

...

Nutter.

As a kid I loved old audio systems.

But I doubt that's normal? Maybe.

Im sorry, the video is beig a prick and wont play for me. But from what im gathering, he is trying to impress kids with a C64 in the PSWii360 generation?

Maybe he was giving them some kind of historical background, but if not, than yeah... I cant say im shocked at their response.

Its sort of like an old car though: just because you restored it to brand new and its from the 70s, its still a fucking Pinto...

Fist game ever was Predator on the C64, closely followed by Lemmings, Rick Dangerous and Captain Planet on the 500+ (Still have it, though lost that huge f*cking modulator for the TV output). Classic, but somewhat irrelevant to school now.

And this surprises people how? In a world with gaming technology as advanced as ours, of course kids don't know or care about the Commodore 64. It's to be expected.

Formica Archonis:

CardinalPiggles:
My Grandad still has a Commodore 64 in great condition. He's hooked it up to his TV monitor and it sits on his desk. I've played it a few times and I have to say, I was impressed by it. The sheer simplistic brilliance of it is amazing.

Plus, I don't think his one takes 10 minutes to load...

The floppy drive was WAY faster than the tape. (Really, if he was deadset on doing a presentation on original hardware he should have brought the FASTER LOADING MEDIUM.)

Ah, I didn't realise there were two different inputs. I guess he should have used the better of the two.

I didn't hear them state that they weren't impressed. They merely mentioned that the graphics are bad when compared to the games of today (which they are) and that the controller was a little off-putting at first. They stated that whilst today it's not as impressive to themselves, in the consoles first couple of years it must've been absolutely incredible.
"It's not really amazing from our point of view," one student admitted. She then immediately backtracked to say "Well, it's good, it's good, but ... for then it must have been pretty incredible."
They simply stated the truth, you can't expect them to swoon over it when they weren't even brought up with it. Hell, I'm just out of compulsory education and there are very few 'classic' consoles which I can remember playing with as a child; The Sega Mega Drive, The N64... It's funny to think that my age puts me at the very borderline of modern graphics-centric video gaming and classic games like Planescape: Torment and Dungeon Keeper.

Another way to put it is to think of the ruins of a castle from the late Dark Ages. It's just a big stone wall around a big stone manor. Its defences are tactically retarded. However, when it was first created in the dark ages it must've been a marvellous feat of modern engineering that was albeit impenetrable. It doesn't mean that the castle isn't a work of genius, it just means that there are more recent and quite frankly better feats of engineering today than there were 900 years ago.

spwatkins:
In contrast, I bet if you showed them an LP record player they would think it was totally awesome.

Not so sure myself.

"So it's a HUGE MP3 player, with worse quality sound, and only stores about 10 tracks on these massive, easily damaged discs? The pictures on the sleeves are quite nice I admit."

Perhaps if he'd designed his talk around the similarity between indie games and classics of the 80s and 90s instead of hoping kids of today would be impressed by tech of 30 years past.

I'm not certain why they're trying to push the concept of loading a game from tape. Back in the day, everyone had the 1541 floppy drive (5 1/4 floppy disks), and the tape drive was something you only bought (with initial bundle) because you didn't know any better.

CardinalPiggles:

Formica Archonis:

The floppy drive was WAY faster than the tape. (Really, if he was deadset on doing a presentation on original hardware he should have brought the FASTER LOADING MEDIUM.)

Ah, I didn't realise there were two different inputs. I guess he should have used the better of the two.

At least three, actually. It also had a cartridge slot. There weren't many games on cartridge, though. I remember having exactly one.

Vzzdak:
I'm not certain why they're trying to push the concept of loading a game from tape. Back in the day, everyone had the 1541 floppy drive (5 1/4 floppy disks), and the tape drive was something you only bought (with initial bundle) because you didn't know any better.

Not me, we had a 1541...and a 1581! 3 1/2 inch floppies for the C64 woo hoo. Unfortunately nothing came out on 3 1/2 inch floppies so the 1541 was the real workhorse. I'm actually looking for a replacement 1541 in online auctions because mine has started the death rattle.

The SID chip (and massive personal nostalgia) makes the C64 the choice for serious retro gaming for me. Most 8 bit graphics are similar but the SID helps the Commodore's music soar.

Well, obviously...

Just like nobody today would be impressed by a Ford model T, it was revolutionary for the time but compared to what we have today it's (obviously) very outdated

He really expected this generation (or rather, any generation that didn't "grow up"with it) to be impressed, or even slightly interested in the C64 ? Yeah, no...

10 minute load times before you can play the game? Sounds like a PS3.

Man, that takes me back. I was running on that thing at the age of 3. I knew my ABCs by then, so I just asked my dad one day to teach me, and the rest was history. I remember a Donald Duck game where you earned cash to buy playground equipment for Huey, Dewy, and Louie. I also remember a brief kids game with 5 different games. The only one I remember was moving a forklift around to match shapes.

Then there were the real games. There was a Bruce Lee inspired game. Yie-Ar Kung Fu, Jumpman Junior, Spelunker, Wizard, Larry Bird and Michael Jordan 1 on 1, Some Dinosaur egg collecting game (I can't recall it anymore), Blue Max, and a bunch of others. Those were some great times.

Well, like that kid said, I can imagine it was the chiz back then. But I'm also unimpressed. But I'm sure it's mostly because I didn't grow up with it.
For example, I'm quite fond of some NES games despite the graphics and music and stuff and you could say the same thing about it.

Twilight_guy:
It's nice as a piece of gaming history, but its outdated and not as good as today's systems. I don't want a 30 year old computer and l don't want a thirty year old TV or a thirty year old cell phone (early 80s phones... ugggh). Technology is a forward moving process. New technology replace old technology and is provably better at things then the old tech. There are very few reason to stick with outdated technology, one of which is nostalgia.

Especially with the advent of emulators. Playing some of your old favourite games? Sure, that's fine. Pulling out a Commodore 64 to do so? Nope.

Hmmm...to quote TV Tropes, this is "Seinfeld Is Unfunny" at its finest. You don't have to pretend it doesn't happen - it's just a fact of life.

People will always be unimpressed with older technology, even if it was what brought something into the mainstream / popularized a genre that hadn't succeeded previously / was innovative and revolutionary at the time. The best we can do is teach people why those older pieces of technology / works were so important, and how they influenced the medium.

nikki191:
a slight correction for the article.

the next system after the c-64 was the generation of amiga and atari-st. now the amiga was a damn good system

The C64 and the Amiga generations overlap quite a bit, which isn't surprising since they were both owned by Commodore. The first Amiga, the Amiga 1000, was released in 1985, and was sold alongside the C64 and its successor, the C128. Sales of the C64 were still going strong in 1988 (I think that's about the time we got ours).

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