Ouya CEO Says Consoles May Become TV Chipsets

Ouya CEO Says Consoles May Become TV Chipsets

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In the wake of a phenomenally successful Kickstarter, Ouya's CEO talks about future plans.

Ouya's Kickstarter is finally over, and it ended with a bang. The Ouya team aimed for $950,000; it got over $8.5 million. In the wake of this achievement Ouya's CEO, Julie Urhman, has talked about what the future may hold for the little console that could. She's naturally a little cautious, and doesn't want to be seen as "Charlie Sheen on a media blitz" - as she describes it - which is why Ouya hasn't revealed many details about their business model and launch plans. However, Ouya does have a lot of things to do in the coming years and, if Urhman has it her way, they may include an Ouya TV.

"We are truly excited and blown away by the support: it's amazing how well an open, affordable, accessible games console has resonated with gamers and developers," said Urhman about the response to Ouya's Kickstarter campaign. "People started asking 'if this is possible, why hasn't it been done before by a large corporation?' But sometimes the simplest ideas are staring you in the face, and they escape people." According to Urhman Ouya's future focus will be on building a great gaming ecosystem, which can then be used to create something that may not need a console to play.

"Right now we are focused on building a great business around gamers and games, and right now we have to be a console connected to a television. That's where the biggest reach and biggest audience is." But the future could be far more interesting. "Who knows what the future holds? We'll have the best suite of content, and the best controller on the market..."

That's how Urhman sees the Ouya; not as a $99 box, but as a means of capturing a market. Once that market belongs to Ouya, anything's possible. There's no reason to keep it in a box, not when TV technology is getting better every day. Even Urhman admits "Ouya could be in a TV ... We always believed that the console would die away and become a chipset on the television. But you still need a great, responsive controller and a gaming ecosystem with great developers and great games."

The coming months will show whether or not Ouya succeeds or fails. It has the funding, and it has everyone's attention. If it can't succeed with these resources at its disposal, then perhaps the project really was doomed from the start. Personally, I hope not; I'm beginning to like the little console that could.

Source: Guardian

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I think that's a long way off honestly. Most people have just recently started getting HD TVs. I'd imagine most would be willing to get another one for at least 5-or-so years. Interesting idea all the same.

Not sure I like that idea unless it became a chipset in every TV. I wouldn't want to ever be forced between picture quality and a gaming console.

Besides, I am fairly certain that no small amount of people have plans to take the hardware out of the box and do interesting things with it that they might be less inclined to do if it meant prying open their TV to do it.

Just so long as they don't make it cloud based.

If Ouya became a chipset presented in a large number of new TVs, as well as a standalone console, and this was marketed and touted by TVs, then I can see Ouya dominating the market. So long as it delivers the goods on the games anyway, and I mean ones outside of Onlive. My connection is no where NEAR good enough for Onlive. It's a miracle I can even play online with people.

Calumon: Putting things that work with with TVs in TVs? That'll never work. :P

A cheap console less than 100 I would buy in a heartbeat, especially how the press release images of the Ouya look. Its a pretty sweet looking piece of hardware. But a TV? I do not think I would buy that, for the most part I am happy with the TVs I have. Replacing them just for Android games is not appealing at all.

I want to believe in Ouya. I'll stick with cautious optimism for now.
If it tanks, it really would be sad to see the industry remain in the hands of the (often inept) hands of the Big Three.

I really like where this system is heading. It may not be designed for AAA titles and fully featured Calls of Duty, but I don't think the industry is going to keep making games like that for much longer. It's very much a case of where the industry is going, rather than where it is and that's the way to go about doing it. I imagine Apple is formulating a similar plan as we speak (with Apple television sets with built in iOS), but of course theirs won't be nearly as open source as this one. They might very well "drink Apple's milkshake" if they get this sucker to market fast enough. I doubt Apple has even considered the idea of putting iOS games in a Roku-like box (outside of Apple TV and that can't play games yet).

Sorry, couldn't hear any of that over the sound of how awesome my PC is.

So if it breaks down, no TV, console, cable, DVR for two weeks while it is off for repairs.

Guess I'll do everything on my PC while I wait...

Honestly, the idea of a TV capable of gaming sounds pretty neat, but I don't like "all in one" things, like laptops or Mac-like computers, because if something breaks, everything breaks. If my TV breaks, I don't have a TV, but I can still use my console in any other TV and if my console breaks, my TV is still perfectly fine and I just get a new console.

If this TV breaks, not only the TV is broken, so do it's gaming capabilities.

I'd still like to have the option of getting a console and connect it and take it anywhere I want, like a friend's house or something. It would be pretty awkward to take my entire TV set just to play a few games.

Yeah, lets try to convince people to pay an extra 200 dollars for a TV so they can have a game console in it... Yeah let's start small and work our way up.

Ouya has yet to prove that its system is even going to work, and it sounds like their already planing there take over of gaming. I don't know what happened to a console that was easy to get into, but I thought that was good idea, as opposed to trying to create a market and planning its rise to power while you have yet to show a working prototype. Don't count your chickens before they are layed.

Abandon4093:
Sorry, couldn't hear any of that over the sound of how awesome my PC is.

What was that? I couldn't hear you over the sound of nobody giving a crap about your e-peen.

ZephrC:

Abandon4093:
Sorry, couldn't hear any of that over the sound of how awesome my PC is.

What was that? I couldn't hear you over the sound of nobody giving a crap about your e-peen.

The point wasn't that my PC is awesome, it's that I don't see the point in this when everything it's striving to accomplish can already be done (and much better) on a PC.

Abandon4093:
The point wasn't that my PC is awesome, it's that I don't see the point in this when everything it's striving to accomplish can already be done (and much better) on a PC.

While that may be true, you'd be surprised how many people have less than zero interest in ever owning a PC, but would be totally interested in gaming on their TV.

I mean, I love my PC, but aside from gaming and my irrational hatred of wireless things there's really not much I use it for that a tablet wouldn't do just as well.

Obviously tablets suck for office applications, but even then it's more practical for most people to have a cheap laptop (or expensive MacBook if they're pretentious) and game on their TV.

Just because something isn't what you want doesn't make it worthless.

ZephrC:

Abandon4093:
Sorry, couldn't hear any of that over the sound of how awesome my PC is.

What was that? I couldn't hear you over the sound of nobody giving a crap about your e-peen.

and im sure his "awesome" PC only costed him 89 dollars so is far better than the OUYA

ZephrC:

Abandon4093:
The point wasn't that my PC is awesome, it's that I don't see the point in this when everything it's striving to accomplish can already be done (and much better) on a PC.

While that may be true, you'd be surprised how many people have less than zero interest in ever owning a PC, but would be totally interested in gaming on their TV.

I mean, I love my PC, but aside from gaming and my irrational hatred of wireless things there's really not much I use it for that a tablet wouldn't do just as well.

Obviously tablets suck for office applications, but even then it's more practical for most people to have a cheap laptop (or expensive MacBook if they're pretentious) and game on their TV.

Just because something isn't what you want doesn't make it worthless.

The cheapest thing to do would just be to buy an adequate PC and hook it up to the TV. Maybe also have a cheap tablet or laptop for mobilities sake.

That's what I do.

enriquetnt:

ZephrC:

Abandon4093:
Sorry, couldn't hear any of that over the sound of how awesome my PC is.

What was that? I couldn't hear you over the sound of nobody giving a crap about your e-peen.

and im sure his "awesome" PC only costed him 89 dollars so is far better than the OUYA

You could probably make a better PC out of 89$ than the OUYA.

Abandon4093:
You could probably make a better PC out of 89$ than the OUYA.

A decent controller alone costs around $30, and I don't know about you, but I can't slap one of those together out of spare parts. That already brings the total price of this mythical PC you want to build down to less than the price of most motherboards if you're buying just one, so somehow I doubt you can build a better PC for that price.

And that's completely ignoring the fact that most people can't build a PC. Period. And have no desire to learn how. It also ignore the numerous benefits of having a 3 inch cube (or nothing aside from the TV itself) instead of a full desktop PC, of having a (hopefully) well organized marketplace, of using standardized hardware, (like being much less buggy, or knowing that if you recommend something to a friend they'll have a similar experience, or knowing that everything will come pre-optimized without hours of tweaking, or developers not having to try to develop for a moving target)

...

Blah. See, this crap is why I refuse to call myself a PC gamer despite the fact that I've been playing more games on PC than on consoles lately. Aside from graphics (which are absolutely the least important part of a game) and mice (which are really only an advantage in FPSs and RTSs, neither of which are my favorite genres anyway) PCs are completely inferior. I just don't like the way the big three console manufacturers have been going lately.

Hey! It's almost like Ouya was designed to address a problem that I was concerned with!!! Imagine that!!!!! :P

ZephrC:

Abandon4093:
You could probably make a better PC out of 89$ than the OUYA.

A decent controller alone costs around $30, and I don't know about you, but I can't slap one of those together out of spare parts. That already brings the total price of this mythical PC you want to build down to less than the price of most motherboards if you're buying just one, so somehow I doubt you can build a better PC for that price.

EDIT: I'm sorry, I don't know why the price is coming up as Chinese symbols in the spoiler... I put them in as sterling... when you quote you'll be able to see them.

Total price 92.

The OUYA is set to retail at $120 with a controller.. So that's what? 80ish?

I'd say I did quite well there considering that that PC would crush what's in the OUYA and it was literally about 10 minutes of searching on ebay... which really isn't where I'd shop for cheap PC parts. Specialised PC retail shops would probably have most of that stuff at half the price.

That particular build, I could probably do for about 60 with a few weeks rummaging in second hand PC dens.

And that's completely ignoring the fact that most people can't build a PC. Period. And have no desire to learn how. It also ignore the numerous benefits of having a 3 inch cube (or nothing aside from the TV itself) instead of a full desktop PC, of having a (hopefully) well organized marketplace, of using standardized hardware, (like being much less buggy, or knowing that if you recommend something to a friend they'll have a similar experience, or knowing that everything will come pre-optimized without hours of tweaking, or developers not having to try to develop for a moving target)

In the next few years Android tablets will be coming out more powerful than the OUYA.

I don't have a major problem with the idea really. I just hate how they're bringing out an already inferior product in a market that's about to get an upheaval.

What really naffs me off is that I like the idea of an android based marketplace that will have tons of indi games on it. I'd love to get a game put on there myself. I just wish they'd open the market place for PCs. Because the OUYA looks like tosh.

Blah. See, this crap is why I refuse to call myself a PC gamer despite the fact that I've been playing more games on PC than on consoles lately. Aside from graphics (which are absolutely the least important part of a game) and mice (which are really only an advantage in FPSs and RTSs, neither of which are my favorite genres anyway) PCs are completely inferior. I just don't like the way the big three console manufacturers have been going lately.

Ignoring modding, cheapness of games and the fact that PC's can do anything a console can do... usually better.

And I actually have a PS3 that I love. Exclusives are awesome on it.

Also graphics aren't the least important part of a game. To say there's a least important part of a game is disingenuous. Different games aim for different things. On some games, amazing graphics are a selling point, on others it might be a quirky game-play element or even the narrative or story.

There is no absolutely most important aspect of a game just like there's no absolutely least important aspect of a game. It depends entirely on what the game is trying to do.

Hey! It's almost like Ouya was designed to address a problem that I was concerned with!!! Imagine that!!!!! :P

I love the idea of it's marketplace. But bottlenecking it's specs at already substandard levels in an environment that's just about to go through some massive changes is in-fucking-sanity.

If they release cheap upgrades to the system that you can install yourself. Or even if you can just buy PC parts and put them in. Then I'd have noooo problem with it. Infact I'd probably quite like the idea of a console that truly does blur the lines between consoles and PCs. But there is no sign of them wanting to do that. So I'm going to sit here and remain naffed off. Especially considering that in a years time there will likely be android tablets coming out more capable than the OUYA.

Abandon4093:
snip

Sorry it took so long to respond. I had to work. But seriously? You're comparing used PC part prices to a new Ouya? (A new Ouya is $99, by the way.) That's not really fair, is it? Rummaging through second hand parts and getting anything remotely useful is so far beyond the average gamer's skill level it's not even funny. Used electronics are cheap because nobody buys that stuff.

And anyway, if we're counting used stuff you know that even if Ouya ends up somehow immediately becoming the fastest selling system ever that everyone in the world loves (not gonna happen, but even if) if you keep a thorough watch on all the second hand places you can you'll find an Ouya for less than dirt within a month of launch.

Plus an open source console should allow for some pretty easy modding.

I'm not trying to suggest that you should go out and buy an Ouya today. Hell, if you really want to play Ouya exclusive games it should be just stupid easy to emulate it. They probably won't even mind if you do as long as you're buying the games. I'm saying that Ouya seems like it could be extremely awesome for myself and quite a few other people if it actually gets good games.

Oh! And yeah, actually, graphics are the least important part of a game. At least a good game. Don't get me wrong, aesthetics and visual design can be quite important for certain games, but most of the best looking games I've seen have been PS2 games. That is not a typo. Sure the fancy lighting and particle effects and whatnot can get the ooohs and aaahs, but it's great artists that make a game truly memorable, with a look that can stand the test of time. You don't need a quad-core and 8 gigs of RAM for that.

ZephrC:

Sorry it took so long to respond. I had to work. But seriously? You're comparing used PC part prices to a new Ouya? (A new Ouya is $99, by the way.) That's not really fair, is it? Rummaging through second hand parts and getting anything remotely useful is so far beyond the average gamer's skill level it's not even funny. Used electronics are cheap because nobody buys that stuff.

But it can still be done.

Even realistically you can make a good PC build from newer parts, still available on specialist websites, for about 200 that is going to make the OUYA look like a calculator.

That's ignoring the obvious advantages even a pre built Dell PC would have over an OUYA. You can buy pretty much complete pre-built rigs for about 100 that sets you down the right path to having a low-mid level gaming rig.

I made my rig for 400 about 4 years ago and it's only had one upgrade since then. And it plays everything on the highest spec.

A decent rig doesn't have to cost the earth, and people make it out to be far more complicated than it actually is. I spent a few weeks checking the compatibility of parts before committing to a build and then just searched the shows for the cheapest stuff.

That's with no previous experience with any electronics.

And anyway, if we're counting used stuff you know that even if Ouya ends up somehow immediately becoming the fastest selling system ever that everyone in the world loves (not gonna happen, but even if) if you keep a thorough watch on all the second hand places you can you'll find an Ouya for less than dirt within a month of launch.

Granted, but it's bottlenecked. You can't upgrade it on the cheap as it's needed like you can a PC.

Plus an open source console should allow for some pretty easy modding.

With any luck, yea. There should be some decent mods coming out.

I'm not trying to suggest that you should go out and buy an Ouya today. Hell, if you really want to play Ouya exclusive games it should be just stupid easy to emulate it. They probably won't even mind if you do as long as you're buying the games. I'm saying that Ouya seems like it could be extremely awesome for myself and quite a few other people if it actually gets good games.

I hope they release the marketplace on PC. Because that looks like an honestly good thing. A dedicated marketplace designed to bring indie games to the masses. Sounds fucking awesome.

But the thing is, what is the console itself going to be able to handle? I think it's gonna struggle to run anything with a remotely high polycount.

Oh! And yeah, actually, graphics are the least important part of a game. At least a good game. Don't get me wrong, aesthetics and visual design can be quite important for certain games, but most of the best looking games I've seen have been PS2 games. That is not a typo. Sure the fancy lighting and particle effects and whatnot can get the ooohs and aaahs, but it's great artists that make a game truly memorable, with a look that can stand the test of time. You don't need a quad-core and 8 gigs of RAM for that.

Higher graphical fidelity allows for more experimentation with art direction.

Sure enough some of my favourite games (in terms of visuals) are incredibly low poly and usually adhere to a cartooney aesthetic, but to say that graphics aren't important is extremely disingenuous.

 

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