Over 1,000 Developers Interested in Making Ouya Games

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Over 1,000 Developers Interested in Making Ouya Games

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More than 50 distributors worldwide are hoping to carry Ouya when it launches.

The massive Kickstarter success of the Android-based Ouya console has left gamers divided. Some are excited for the console's potential and comparably low price tag. Others have dismissed it as nothing more than a box that can play smartphone games on a television, with no real potential for greatness. No matter what your feelings on Ouya are, game developers are apparently excited about it. According to Ouya, it's been approached by over a thousand developers since its Kickstarter campaign ended.

Ouya's Julie Uhrman also announced that more than 50 distributors "from all around the world" had applied to carry the console, though she didn't specify whether any big-name retailers were among them. The company has expanded its ranks, naming former IGN president Roy Bahat chairman of the board and hiring Steve Chamberlin of Trion and EA "to run our engineering." Additionally, Raffi Bagdasarian, formerly of Sony Pictures Television, will "lead software product, including user experience and our services for game developers."

It sounds like Ouya is receiving a lot of support from the industry, but I'm sure backers would like to hear some more specifics, like which developers have shown interest and when the console might be available. In the meantime, gamers can continue to predict whether Ouya will be a massive, industry-changing success or colossal, embarrassing failure.

Source: Ouya via Kotaku

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Ouya is like apple pie: everybody wants a piece!

I'm still holding out hope for this. If it performs well and makes people happy we may be looking at a better industry.

Quoted from Wikipedia
"In marketing terminology, a killer application (commonly shortened to killer app) is any computer program that is so necessary or desirable that it proves the core value of some larger technology, such as computer hardware, gaming console, software, a programming language, software platform, or an operating system. In other words, consumers would buy the (expensive) hardware just to run that application. A killer app can substantially increase sales of the platform on which it runs."

This is what the Ouya will need. Something big. Something everyone will have heard of after it hits.
Portable Consoles used to be the only show in town for mobile gaming, then Angry Birds happened; Sony & Nintendo have been waking up in cold sweats since
Ouya has Final Fantasy III secured as a launch title, so they've got a core demographic of people who will buy them day 1 anyway.

Then again, it's android based, so Netflix & Hulu support shouldn't be far off. It's already got Onlive. With proper marketing, it could sell well on it's alternative uses & low cost

Fappy:
I'm still holding out hope for this. If it performs well and makes people happy we may be looking at a better industry.

Agreed.
Its good to see another party step into the console ring. With the developer support they already have, this little 99$ console could rock the market.

Going to be fun to watch.

If they play their cards right, the Ouya could be a strong contender in the upcoming console cycle, but that's a big if, then again, the idea of the 'people's console' could be a huge thing for them. It's time for the waiting game.

My only hope is that the Ouya becomes a baseline for app, or at least game, development on android. One of the biggest problems with android is the fragmentation and diversity of the specs that all the different devices have. For the average consumer they don't understand if they can even run an app until after they've purchased it.

If the Ouya can become a minimum spec sheet for phone development I see only good things in the future.

I bought mine just to work as a cheap htpc for my other TV, a focus on gaming is a bonus.

50 =/= Over 1000...

Regardless, this is good news. I hope this thing sells well.

Given what the machine actually is, I'm not surprised it's garnering developer interest. Not that it's bad, but it's the sort of thing that will likely be extremely easy to just port your iOS, Android or PC indie games over to with no extra fuss. If you can do so, why wouldn't you?

Wait... what? Android is an OS for mobile platforms... right? Yeah, designed primarily for touchscreen mobile devices. Why would that make a good console?

No really, why would it make a good console?

If I remember correctly, Android is Linux based, is this really going to be a Linux console? Aren't we just talking about a PC now? Except worse because you can't upgrade the hardware? Okay, so it's a PC designed for specific use... just like any other console?

I don't get the fervor, I really don't.

.....so let me get this straight. For the position of chairman of a gaming firm, they picked, a guy from a website. For the position of head of engineering and manufacturing, they picked, a guy from a publisher that has never in its history made a console. And as head of software development, they pick, a guy who used to make movies.

Its like one of those bad parodies where they just put people in base on name recognition without realizing they're totally wrong for these roles.

Mr.Mattress:
50 =/= Over 1000...

Regardless, this is good news. I hope this thing sells well.

And distributor =/= developer. No error in them numbers.

I'm still curious if it's gonna be available in my country without having to buy from Germany or import from UK. Never was much of a console player, but this certainly looks to have a lot of potential for fun.

Pebkio:
Wait... what? Android is an OS for mobile platforms... right? Yeah, designed primarily for touchscreen mobile devices. Why would that make a good console?

No really, why would it make a good console?

If I remember correctly, Android is Linux based, is this really going to be a Linux console? Aren't we just talking about a PC now? Except worse because you can't upgrade the hardware? Okay, so it's a PC designed for specific use... just like any other console?

I don't get the fervor, I really don't.

People are projecting their hopes and dreams onto a new console without stopping to take a minute to actually think about what the console and the project could realistically deliver.

The tears to come are going to be delicious.

Mr.Mattress:
50 =/= Over 1000...

Regardless, this is good news. I hope this thing sells well.

Distributers =/= Developers

cidbahamut:

People are projecting their hopes and dreams onto a new console without stopping to take a minute to actually think about what the console and the project could realistically deliver.

The tears to come are going to be delicious.

Yeah, I guess. I must've missed the big moment that makes people love this console over the other consoles. Maybe because it's new?

I don't even understand what hopes and dreams you're talking about... because the things I've seen promised from this console is the same crap I see already on other consoles. Netflix and Hulu are already available on the 360, what is so special about having non gaming stuff on a gaming console? It boggles my mind.

---

So I decided to look up the facts, and I found a fact-sheet from the press kit. Here are a few things I saw that (might?) be different:

Ouya is:
"Open to any developer to publish a game - unlike any of the current game consoles"
(I wasn't aware that only a select group of publishers were allowed on Microsoft of Sony's console)
"All games are free-to-play (with in-game items, paid version after free trial, etc.)"
(Aside from the MMO possibility, that's standard demo-work)
"For Hackers - built to be hacked"

This last one basically means that it's easy to root, comes with a debug console, and is easy to open with standard equipment. There was also something in there about customizable user-interfaces but I'm guessing that'll be "customizable to a point".

The free-to-play is also not as exciting as you think because it's what we see on phones today. The only difference from regular consoles is that it'll download the whole game with most of it locked away behind a subscription service. And even if they don't go all corrupt with subscriptions for offline games, the pricing will remain the same. It'll be no better, and has the possibility of being worse, than the XBLA system.

As for the "anyone can publish" thing, I've seen it before... with Apple. Ouya will have one publisher and that publisher will be Ouya. Developers submit their IP to Ouya who then publishes that IP for a fee. Games will be presented as apps. This sounds fine until you remember that developers usually rely on Bethesda or EA because those companies give them investment money to start a project. Kickstarter could change all that, so this is the only thing I'm actually a bit excited for.

Except that whole "you can hack us all day and night - no penalty" thing might scare some developers away. The real success is if they can get more than flash-like games for their console, and I don't see why AAA would hop on board.

It's interesting though, I'll give it that. Still, I don't think it's the game-changer everyone is calling for.

Edit: It also relies on the success of kickstarter in general... and the jury is still out on that. I like kickstarter, but it's going to fail hard if even 10% of the projects don't deliver.

I believe this will be the first Kickstarter scam. They have promised over 100,000 Ouyas to the people that have pledged enough money and even with their massive success, I think that the manufacturing of all those "pre-orders" may cause them a lot of financial strain.

cidbahamut:

Pebkio:
Wait... what? Android is an OS for mobile platforms... right? Yeah, designed primarily for touchscreen mobile devices. Why would that make a good console?

No really, why would it make a good console?

If I remember correctly, Android is Linux based, is this really going to be a Linux console? Aren't we just talking about a PC now? Except worse because you can't upgrade the hardware? Okay, so it's a PC designed for specific use... just like any other console?

I don't get the fervor, I really don't.

People are projecting their hopes and dreams onto a new console without stopping to take a minute to actually think about what the console and the project could realistically deliver.

The tears to come are going to be delicious.

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Yeah, this Ouya thing is another sample of people throwing money at something they don't understand.

I do hope it does well! We could use more consoles around!

Pebkio:

...
So I decided to look up the facts, and I found a fact-sheet from the press kit. Here are a few things I saw that (might?) be different:

Ouya is:
"Open to any developer to publish a game - unlike any of the current game consoles"
(I wasn't aware that only a select group of publishers were allowed on Microsoft of Sony's console)

they are called Software Development Kits (SDK), and for the major consoles XBox-X, PSX, NintendoThing they require to either purchase in terms of Sony (the price is not to be disclosed to the public), or the game submitted for approval, and then given a Dev-Kit for that tittle (Nintendo), or similar to before but like a rental (Microsoft). these dev-kits will be similar to the base system that was released for that console, and should be used to test against, and on (this is why no matter how many times they release the 360/PS3 it won't be that much different then the gen 1), and has some extra features that are locked away, or excluded on the actual system. it also has the possibility to directly accept drivers for peripherals, or output console logs to external system, and saying anything more would vialate NDA.

Pebkio:

"All games are free-to-play (with in-game items, paid version after free trial, etc.)"
(Aside from the MMO possibility, that's standard demo-work)
"For Hackers - built to be hacked"

This last one basically means that it's easy to root, comes with a debug console, and is easy to open with standard equipment. There was also something in there about customizable user-interfaces but I'm guessing that'll be "customizable to a point".

yes, and no: what they are talking about is not "rooting the system" (it might already grant root access) they are talking about trading out hardware, and it is using the Android frame work for the customization, but yes if they do include bloatware it will still be there.

Pebkio:

The free-to-play is also not as exciting as you think because it's what we see on phones today. The only difference from regular consoles is that it'll download the whole game with most of it locked away behind a subscription service. And even if they don't go all corrupt with subscriptions for offline games, the pricing will remain the same. It'll be no better, and has the possibility of being worse, than the XBLA system.

not necessarily, and your idea is way off base. in order to have a demo on a service like XBLA it must be submitted separately, and downloaded separately by the user. granted most of the time the "demo" is just the first level or so doesn't mean you have the entire game on your system for the sole reason that if you do want to go all supper hacker you might be able to get the files, and depending on the system/language decompile, and release your own "version", but this is usually a lot more of a headache then is worth, and even then sometimes it is comical to even watch.

Pebkio:

As for the "anyone can publish" thing, I've seen it before... with Apple. Ouya will have one publisher and that publisher will be Ouya. Developers submit their IP to Ouya who then publishes that IP for a fee. Games will be presented as apps. This sounds fine until you remember that developers usually rely on Bethesda or EA because those companies give them investment money to start a project. Kickstarter could change all that, so this is the only thing I'm actually a bit excited for.

no think the Android market place, so its not so much submitting it to a "single" publisher, but instead releasing it into the wild for sale.

Pebkio:

Except that whole "you can hack us all day and night - no penalty" thing might scare some developers away. The real success is if they can get more than flash-like games for their console, and I don't see why AAA would hop on board.

It's interesting though, I'll give it that. Still, I don't think it's the game-changer everyone is calling for.

Edit: It also relies on the success of kickstarter in general... and the jury is still out on that. I like kickstarter, but it's going to fail hard if even 10% of the projects don't deliver.

and in your previous post about it being Linux, and just a glorified computer. Someone doesn't really understand Android. Android is a derivative of Linux, but only to the point of the kernal everything after that is a framework that has less to do with Linux then the IPhone does. granted yes they are taking a frame-work that was originally designed for a phone, and connecting it to the tv, but isn't most invention/innovation taking something that already exists, and either modifying, or re-purposing it. complaining that they are taking something that is made for one thing, and using it for another is like complaining that Computer Science uses binary, or that cellphones even exist.

gardian06:

yes, and no: what they are talking about is not "rooting the system" (it might already grant root access) they are talking about trading out hardware, and it is using the Android frame work for the customization, but yes if they do include bloatware it will still be there.

They, in fact, mention rooting the system in the fact sheet. I doubt they'll have root access and all the options grant forthwith as they're trying to sell to the common consumer. Still, it'll probably be pretty easy to unlock. Still, moot point, we're both right, basically. I only posted this bit because I didn't want to look like I was flat-out ignoring some things you said.

not necessarily, and your idea is way off base. in order to have a demo on a service like XBLA it must be submitted separately, and downloaded separately by the user. granted most of the time the "demo" is just the first level or so doesn't mean you have the entire game on your system for the sole reason that if you do want to go all supper hacker you might be able to get the files, and depending on the system/language decompile, and release your own "version", but this is usually a lot more of a headache then is worth, and even then sometimes it is comical to even watch.

Okay, yeah, the demo system on XBLA is separated from the actual purchasing system. The Ouya won't be. Ups and downs on both sides. For instance, I don't really want to download 10 gigs just to test out a game. But on the flip side, the confusing set up you mentioned.

By the way, if you want to hack a console, easier just to download a pre-built external because programming on a computer is always easier. I don't see that changing on this console. I don't do this myself, but I know the theory.

no think the Android market place, so its not so much submitting it to a "single" publisher, but instead releasing it into the wild for sale.

No, you happen to just be wrong on this one. If you want to be able to publish anything to the Android Market, you have to pay that initial fee of $25. And you aren't paying into the wild. You are paying, specifically, Google. Yes, Google runs the Android Marketplace, meaning that you send your app to them and they publish it on their marketplace. I actually had to go research that quite a bit.

Don't believe me? It's right here.

and in your previous post about it being Linux, and just a glorified computer. Someone doesn't really understand Android. Android is a derivative of Linux, but only to the point of the kernal everything after that is a framework that has less to do with Linux then the IPhone does. granted yes they are taking a frame-work that was originally designed for a phone, and connecting it to the tv, but isn't most invention/innovation taking something that already exists, and either modifying, or re-purposing it. complaining that they are taking something that is made for one thing, and using it for another is like complaining that Computer Science uses binary, or that cellphones even exist.

Built ground up from the Linux kernal still makes it a Linux system, even if it's more proprietary (finally remembered the word I was going for). But didn't you know? Xbox 360 is really a glorified PC too.

Comparing the very basis of digital language to a complex set of protocols designed to interface software, hardware, and the user (what an OS is and does) is pretty bad form. But, I will admit I was being a bit facetious. Obviously they wanted to build the console up around the marketplace idea. I get that now.

Not a bad idea; but as I stated in the quote you had used, this attempt to circumvent classic means of game publishing depends on kickstarter being successful and AAA developers getting on board.

I'll preface this by saying I'm a Ouya Kickstarter backer - Limited Edition no less. However, I am VERY worried about the future of what I thought I was backing. I make my general disgust for "Consoles" - proprietary, crippled computers you pay for but don't own because you want to play the games that are often exclusively held hostage upon them - well known. After what I've seen this generation with X360/PS3/3DS/Vita etc, I'd be happy if the concept of a console could simply die out. However, I backed Ouya because it proposed something different - an open system, equally available for the living room console "push button, box work" type and the technophile modder and hacker.

Their rhetoric spoke of the fact that you had access to the hardware and software, "anyone" could publish etc. Now, I didn't expect everything to be completely open source or without Ouya guiding the contents of their own Ouya Marketplace, but I do expect it to be as open as Android, given that Ouya's software is derived from that very platform. Android is, especially as far as consumer electronics platforms go, wonderfully open. There are plenty of modifications out there as well as forks and hacks given its (mostly, there are still some issues of course) open source nature. You can use any number of "App marketplace" repositories or none at all, choosing to sideload every .apk you wish. Best of all, this can all be done concurrently on "normal" branches of Android (As opposed to say, the Android-based forks used in KindleOS which is made to encourage the user to purchase exclusively from Amazon's properties etc..).

Go into the settings and turn on the ability to load your own applications manually, and you're free, with all the responsibility and privileges this entails. Does this allow for piracy? Of course it does, and easily so However, even better is that Google (nor many other market providers) does not cripple functionality because you flipped that switch. You don't lose your Google Play or GApps functionality - you're not locked out of the ecosystem because you chose to reach beyond it. Instead, you can share and choose as you like This is the main difference between "Console" platforms and something like Android; and the reason that Android is thriving despite "rampant piracy". To their credit, Google and others involved in Android know that if you lock the door behind them (especially if you take all their fruit at the door!) when they leave your walled garden, they will never have reason to return. Thus, a simple gate system is much better, allowing users to come and go as they please without punishing them for looking beyond the walls in the first place. They will continue to have the chance to buy that would never be possible if they were booted out the first time they peeked outside. Combined with (generally) smart pricing, FOSS multiplatform tools, and cheap licensing, Android's software community thrives. Except of course, in the minds of bean-counters who fallaciously count up all the pirated or brought-from-elsewhere instances they can find and assume they are somehow real losses, driving them into a frenzy.

What does this all have to do with Ouya? Well, as it turns out, quite a bit. I backed Ouya with them championing "Open" everywhere, thinking that between their apparent love of "openness" and the Android platform from which they were building, that their system would at least be as open as I describe above. For a console, it is a radical concept I want to support - users being able to maintain their Ouya handle, buy from the store, play online with others etc...even if they "hack around" (not in-game cheats of course or anything detrimental to other's enjoyment. I'm talking about say... Undubs of game content, XBMC/MythTV builds, other tools and game mods, homebrews, etc..) and load in content from other sources; it would happily live besides Ouya purchased content in the same ecosystem - with the "This is not an official Ouya vetted application" warnings necessary, of course. Bringing the "Android Marketplace Coexistence" approach to consoles is truly something I wish to support, and would be the revolution that Ouya was talking about. Unfortunately, I'm worried that won't be so.

Awhile ago, there was some Tweet released that basically "clarified" that their plan wasn't Android-style openness, but "You can root the device so you hackers can install something else on the hardware, but it will be a completely different partition of sorts that won't interact with any official Ouya ecosystems". This isn't bloody revolutionary - this is just PS3's OtherOS again. If I wanted to buy a small box filled with Android-compliant hardware, so I could install Android upon it, I could build one myself right now. I don't want to see Ouya to be another XboxLive/PSN where you're either forced to pay-to-play exclusively by their rules, at their table, with their toys, or you're out. Just creating that kind of system atop commodity hardware isn't revolutionary nor desirable. In courting all these major developers, it appears that Ouya is willing to fall into the industry panic over piracy and erase its biggest draw. The good thing is thankfully we have some time to hopefully change some minds

I urge anyone else who was looking forward to Ouya at least being as open as Android, with full coexistence between official Ouya content and 3rd party content from elsewhere, to contact them with your concerns. Otherwise, we might be getting an Android boxed locked exclusively to a single "marketplace"; less valuable than Android itself. That is not the ideal I paid to back.

I remember Nintendo throwing out the same claim in the early and prelaunch days of the Wii.
Which pretty much translated into the device becoming a shovelware dispersal unit fairly quickly.

I hope it does well, I truly do, but I'm not holding my breath.

cidbahamut:

The tears to come are going to be delicious.

Hmmm, the question for you that i have is, would you prefer if it failed or succeeded in what it is trying to do?

RanceJustice:
Awhile ago, there was some Tweet released that basically "clarified" that their plan wasn't Android-style openness, but "You can root the device so you hackers can install something else on the hardware, but it will be a completely different partition of sorts that won't interact with any official Ouya ecosystems".

Damn I was ready to write some stern walls of text to the completely uneducated naysayers in this thread, but if this is true then they have somehow blindly hit the mark... this will be no better then the others.

While trust in the company to turn their ways around is admirable I have far more faith in the tenacity of the talented young people who make it their challenge to crack everything.

DVS BSTrD:
Ouya is like apple pie: everybody wants a piece!

And teenagers are inclined to have sex with it!

RanceJustice:
snip

Now see, I thought the point WAS the Android's openness. But this just sounds like, well, any other console. However, let's be honest with ourselves, you and all your techiness isn't really the target audience. People who like the Marketplace setup are their target.

And it looks like it's being built up around the Marketplace idea. I mean, that's what they're really going for here, right? Sure, you could build your own Android box, but it won't have the "made-for-console" content Ouya trying to build up.

Besides, if the biggest draw was for pirated software to work along-side purchased software... well... PC video cards can have HDMI ports... just saying...

Still, I can understand why you'd be upset because you paid for something you thought they were selling.

Mr.Mattress:
50 =/= Over 1000...

Regardless, this is good news. I hope this thing sells well.

A developer is not a distributor.

TizzytheTormentor:
I do hope it does well! We could use more consoles around!

Well that's the problem. This is another branch in consoles right when the console industry is either on the verge of a killer development or about to come crashing down, depending on who you ask. Adding this into the mix will only help a) android game devs and b) PC owners.

Wait, where in the article does it mention how many developers are interested in it... THE TITLE LIED TO ME ABOUT THE STORY!

Anywho, if over 100 developers are interested in it still means diddly shit. This is a console for indie developers. Only a quarter will produce a game and their market will be full of small teams of people that make simple games rather then big developers. This is like saying an indie film festival is great because it has numerous studios (each made of no more then a dozen guys).

Pebkio:
Wait... what? Android is an OS for mobile platforms... right? Yeah, designed primarily for touchscreen mobile devices. Why would that make a good console?

No really, why would it make a good console?

If I remember correctly, Android is Linux based, is this really going to be a Linux console? Aren't we just talking about a PC now? Except worse because you can't upgrade the hardware? Okay, so it's a PC designed for specific use... just like any other console?

I don't get the fervor, I really don't.

Please don't take this statement as a criticism or me trying to sway you, you are completely entitled to your opinions and feelings. I just want to actually answer your questions (even if they were rhetorical which I'm not sure on) as I see a lot of people on both sides asking similar things.

From what I understand it will run a variation of Android, not Android itself. The reason this is a good idea is that a number of things (Dungeon Defenders, Minecraft, OnLive, Emulators etc.) have support for Android so ports will be easier. Touchscreen will not be an issue as the controller has a touchpad in it. Not sure how that will work, but we will see. I suspect it won't be used very often.

Now onto the next part. I suppose you can say we are talking about a PC if you consider a console a PC (for the record I do not but I understand why some people do), but it is worth noting the operating system is not the same as the one on a PC. It is also worth noting it is smaller so it would be easier to setup and move. The fact that its cheap and easy to get in to and setup for gaming is also a plus (You have no idea how hard it is to convince my dad to use Steam. He isn't familiar with the company so he assumes they are trying to steal his credit card information). It is also possible to upgrade the hardware, so that part doesn't need more explanation.

The "Just like any other console" part gets its own paragraph. Yes, it is just like any other console at its most basic level. That is more or less its mission, to be a console but to be better. Its attempting to change it up by allowing mods (both hardware and software I believe), easy access for indies (and free unlike XBLA so if you are a programmer you can run your own games on it), and every game will have a demo or some other form of a free trial version. The easy indie access and relation to Android are worth noting as it will be easy to get things on the console. I expect within a short amount of time emulators will be on it as quite a few exist for Android phones already. So what I am saying is that it is a console, but that is what it wants to be. Its supposed to be a console that is for gamers and gaming rather than for money and business. Its supposed to be a console that keeps what console gamers love, and remove what they don't. For the record I am not saying it WILL live up to these standards, but that is the goal they presented. Whether or not it will succeed in that goal has yet to be determined.

I hope I have helped clear some things up for you and for anyone else who was having the same questions you were. Again, sorry if you were being rhetorical and sorry if my hope for Ouya came off as attempting to convince you it would be great as that was not my intention.

Well, I'd certainly like to see what games get made for the system. If there's anything interesting I'll consider picking it up.

I went and found one of the Twitter convos that is worrisome. There are several others with similar data, but since they were basically replies to those not on their main stream, they're a bit harder to find swiftly.

https://twitter.com/playouya/status/225096975568207872

This illustrates that if you root your Ouya, they plan for it to erase the Marketplace! They claim to be looking into "Unrooting" to bring it back, but that's no consolation in my opinion. You shouldn't have to lose it in the first place! At best, this is looking somewhat like OtherOS, but it could be worse depending if the "rooted" and "normal" modes are allowed to coexist. When you root Android, it doesn't basically create a whole different partition and install of the OS, it just modifies your existing one. Thus, it could be that if you spend time rooting your Ouya, installing a "generic" Android build etc... you would have to lose all that to "go back" to the Ouya ecosystem approved version of the OS. Thus, every time you would want to make the change you'd have to go through the "reformatting" process so to speak - this is worse than OtherOS in that regard. I'm also worried about, like OtherOS, if there will be restrictions of accessing the hardware to try and keep enterprising hackers from investigating how the Ouya software itself works. Considering that Android is basically run in a JVM itself, this is going to be a lost cause but it is still disappointing that this "typical console" mindset could be an issue

If they're going to be making rooting of all things incompatible with their Ouya ecosystem, I don't have much faith that they're going to allow say, sideloading of one's own apps (which doesn't usually require root, mind you). Thus, it appears they're going for the typical console setup of "You play in our sandbox, you use only approved toys that you buy from us, nothing comes in, nothing goes out". Ouya marketed itself as something different, but if this goes through it just appears that Ouya will be basically a box that plays Android content that it allows through its proprietary and sole application store; which in my opinion is less valuable than a "pure" Android box. If this was the plan, why not simply make Ouya's "store/ecosystem" a commodity Android app much like Amazon's AppMarketplace, to be installed on a multitude of Android hardware? Severely disappointing if things end this way.

Perhaps if we (politely, please) make this a big issue, writing erudite explanations of what we want to see changed, sending them directly to the company and putting them up on blogs and game industry journalism websites, there is the potential they will change. After all, Ouya claims to be so different from other consoles and they're the "big, visible" Kickstarter project - they can't afford to fail the community that brought them to prominence in the first place or else they'll go down in history as a massive flop.

Winthrop:

I suppose you can say we are talking about a PC if you consider a console a PC (for the record I do not but I understand why some people do), but it is worth noting the operating system is not the same as the one on a PC. It is also worth noting it is smaller so it would be easier to setup and move. The fact that its cheap and easy to get in to and setup for gaming is also a plus (You have no idea how hard it is to convince my dad to use Steam. He isn't familiar with the company so he assumes they are trying to steal his credit card information). It is also possible to upgrade the hardware, so that part doesn't need more explanation.

Consoles are indeed computers, specifically, proprietary computers. For the record, cell-phones are computers too. PCs come with all kinds of OS's. Mine has Windows and Apple machines come with Macintosh. An OS itself is just a series of protocols, usually tied into a user interface, that facilitates the management and use of hardware by various software. The Android OS was primarily designed for use on touchscreen mobile devices, but, it was designed within Linux. Just seemed odd to me that they're basing it's coding off of Android and not, say, Linux.

SNIP ...Its supposed to be a console that is for gamers and gaming rather than for money and business. Its supposed to be a console that keeps what console gamers love, and remove what they don't. For the record I am not saying it WILL live up to these standards, but that is the goal they presented. Whether or not it will succeed in that goal has yet to be determined.

Leaving aside the whole hacker debate that's been taking place thanks to "some Tweet", let's discuss this. I've been seeing this a lot and I have to say... I'm worried that people think this way. The most important thing this console will bring about is the bypassing of conventional publishing practices (if it works) but any product someone sells will be for the business of making money. Sometimes they try to make it fair practice, and sometimes they try to cater to more left-handed ideals... but if they don't make enough money, things will get really shitty really quick. Don't expect them to screw anybody but the consumer first.

Pebkio:

Snip
The Android OS was primarily designed for use on touchscreen mobile devices, but, it was designed within Linux. Just seemed odd to me that they're basing it's coding off of Android and not, say, Linux.

Why build something from scratch when you don't have to? I have not really routed through the coding of android myself (mostly because I have a life). But I don't think it would take more time to modify android for a console, instead of say: start from scratch with linux.

I don't think they rebuild the entire windows OS for windows 8 either. And that is pretty much the same as has happened here (only the other way around). Knowing Microsoft, they will ofcourse have to bring out 2 service packs just to have the bloody thing boot without catching fire but still :P.

Pebkio:

SNIP ...Its supposed to be a console that is for gamers and gaming rather than for money and business. Its supposed to be a console that keeps what console gamers love, and remove what they don't. For the record I am not saying it WILL live up to these standards, but that is the goal they presented. Whether or not it will succeed in that goal has yet to be determined.

Leaving aside the whole hacker debate that's been taking place thanks to "some Tweet", let's discuss this. I've been seeing this a lot and I have to say... I'm worried that people think this way. The most important thing this console will bring about is the bypassing of conventional publishing practices (if it works) but any product someone sells will be for the business of making money. Sometimes they try to make it fair practice, and sometimes they try to cater to more left-handed ideals... but if they don't make enough money, things will get really shitty really quick. Don't expect them to screw anybody but the consumer first.

I agree with you on this one. If history has shown us anything, it's that people (sometimes) start out with the noblest of intentions and end up shitting all over them for power and money.

Pebkio:

Winthrop:

I suppose you can say we are talking about a PC if you consider a console a PC (for the record I do not but I understand why some people do), but it is worth noting the operating system is not the same as the one on a PC. It is also worth noting it is smaller so it would be easier to setup and move. The fact that its cheap and easy to get in to and setup for gaming is also a plus (You have no idea how hard it is to convince my dad to use Steam. He isn't familiar with the company so he assumes they are trying to steal his credit card information). It is also possible to upgrade the hardware, so that part doesn't need more explanation.

Consoles are indeed computers, specifically, proprietary computers. For the record, cell-phones are computers too. PCs come with all kinds of OS's. Mine has Windows and Apple machines come with Macintosh. An OS itself is just a series of protocols, usually tied into a user interface, that facilitates the management and use of hardware by various software. The Android OS was primarily designed for use on touchscreen mobile devices, but, it was designed within Linux. Just seemed odd to me that they're basing it's coding off of Android and not, say, Linux.

SNIP ...Its supposed to be a console that is for gamers and gaming rather than for money and business. Its supposed to be a console that keeps what console gamers love, and remove what they don't. For the record I am not saying it WILL live up to these standards, but that is the goal they presented. Whether or not it will succeed in that goal has yet to be determined.

Leaving aside the whole hacker debate that's been taking place thanks to "some Tweet", let's discuss this. I've been seeing this a lot and I have to say... I'm worried that people think this way. The most important thing this console will bring about is the bypassing of conventional publishing practices (if it works) but any product someone sells will be for the business of making money. Sometimes they try to make it fair practice, and sometimes they try to cater to more left-handed ideals... but if they don't make enough money, things will get really shitty really quick. Don't expect them to screw anybody but the consumer first.

The first half is a little off topic, but I'll bite. I consider the motherboard to be the computer. If you go through any formal computer engineering classes that is what they will tell you as well. I have not done extensive research, but I believe the motherboards are similar, but still different enough that I would not consider them computers much in the same way I don't consider pinball machines computers despite the fact that they have a motherboard. They are similar to computers, but aren't computers themselves. As for the operating system, I am well aware of that as well. That said, the operating system of a cellphone would likely not work on your PC or it would not be used on a PC. That was all I was trying to say. The Ouya's OS would likely be more optimized for gaming than what you tend to find to find on the PC as fewer background programs and things would be running. Basing it off of Android will make it easier to port games from Android to Ouya. Because of this, it will have a greater support at launch then if it were to use Linux. Androids ties to Linux aren't as strong as you think. Android is based of the Linux kernel (so yes it is a Linux distribution) but it differs extensively from what you will find in use on a computer. To me this is just semantics though and again its fairly irrelevant.

As for the second part I am well aware of what you are saying. I was trying to make that clear with the last few sentences of that paragraph, but I see where that could be missed. I feel its important to make it clear that I am not a backer because I don't exactly believe this will succeed. I was simply trying to make you aware of the goals the Ouya makers presented and the reasons behind the hype.

Yeah, there is huge interest from a lot of small time indies who want some sales.
Is there any interest on the consumer front, however, to play these games?

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