Steam Now Offers Non-Gaming Software

 Pages 1 2 NEXT
 

Steam Now Offers Non-Gaming Software

image

Make games, sculpt models, and paint with Steam's new software library.

It may be a month later than originally promised, but Valve is now offering non-game software for sale through Steam. Moreover, the whole available catalog is 10% off through Tuesday, October 9th.

The initial offering, though a little sparse, still contains a variety of productivity tools. In addition to the previously available Source Filmmaker, the library contains 3D-Coat, a voxel sculpting program, and ArtRage Studio Pro, a painting tool. A variety of free and paid versions of GameMaker Studio are available as well. Performance testing tools 3D Mark 11 and 3D Mark Vantage round out the catalog's personal- and organizational-oriented software, along with photo-organizer CameraBag 2.

Steam still has a long way to go before it can become a one-stop digital shop for any software you could need, but these new products look like a good first step.

Source: Steam

Permalink

I might add that the page for 3D Coat states that you can compile from it directly to the Team Fortress 2 workshop. Sweet for anyone who wants to make their own stuff for that game.

A monopoly in the making, indeed.
This is fucking creepy to watch, considernig how my favorite game distribution platform is now growing into other markets not quite unlike cancer.
But maybe I'm just afraid of change here.

I remember when Valve made games, those were good times.

Why are people freaking out that a software distribution platform is now selling other kinds of software and just one type (games)?

Andrewtheeviscerator:
I remember when Valve made games, those were good times.

They released CS:GO not long ago you know, actually if I remember right the only year, since Half-Life, they didn't release a game was 2002.

iniudan:

Andrewtheeviscerator:
I remember when Valve made games, those were good times.

They released CS:GO not long ago you know, actually if I remember right the only year, since Half-Life, they didn't release a game was 2002.

You could also argue that Dota 2 is out now. Yes its a beta, but in my mind an open beta is basically a release where the developers have sworn in blood that the game is unfinished and that they will complete it.

Hmmm, this is kind of creepy.. This morning I started thinking I should try to start getting into making games and now this happens? Could this be a sign?

anyways, this is kind of scary. If valve continue as they are doing now, you have everything you need on steam and that's not good at all.

Captcha: end of the world. Yes captcha, this might be the end of world as we know it.

I think this is a good idea on Steam's part. Increasing both a wider audience in terms of getting artists and digital creators together with offering both Programs, Games, and the Greenlight service which now means that Game Developers and Amateur creators can all gather together to create and share content.

gigastar:

iniudan:

Andrewtheeviscerator:
I remember when Valve made games, those were good times.

They released CS:GO not long ago you know, actually if I remember right the only year, since Half-Life, they didn't release a game was 2002.

You could also argue that Dota 2 is out now. Yes its a beta, but in my mind an open beta is basically a release where the developers have sworn in blood that the game is unfinished and that they will complete it.

CS:GO was just a HD upgrade so I would hardly call that a new game, and Dota 2 isn't developed by Valve its published, all Valve did was buy out the guy who made the original Dota.

So now there's games and game-making tools. Wonder what they'll add next.

Regarding this whole Steam monopoly thing. I could copy Shamus Young here...

Shamus:
There's an old joke where an old-timey top-hat wearing tycoon booms something to the effect of, "We're not a monopoly on purpose, it's just that our products are SO GOOD that nobody feels the need to compete with us!" In this case, you'd need a version that looks like Gabe Newell, and instead of a top hat he's wearing 50 TF2 hats, and he's saying, "We're not a monopoly on purpose, it's just that our competition is SO STUPID they can't compete with us, even though they have more money and all our techniques are public and they've had 10 years to figure it out!"

It's not that I want Steam to have more or less market share, it's that I want the other guys to make an honest effort to TAKE IT from them.

http://www.shamusyoung.com/twentysidedtale/?p=16736&cpage=1#comment-291263

Pretty much my view on that.

Irridium:
So now there's games and game-making tools. Wonder what they'll add next.

Regarding this whole Steam monopoly thing. I could copy Shamus Young here...

Shamus:
There's an old joke where an old-timey top-hat wearing tycoon booms something to the effect of, "We're not a monopoly on purpose, it's just that our products are SO GOOD that nobody feels the need to compete with us!" In this case, you'd need a version that looks like Gabe Newell, and instead of a top hat he's wearing 50 TF2 hats, and he's saying, "We're not a monopoly on purpose, it's just that our competition is SO STUPID they can't compete with us, even though they have more money and all our techniques are public and they've had 10 years to figure it out!"

It's not that I want Steam to have more or less market share, it's that I want the other guys to make an honest effort to TAKE IT from them.

http://www.shamusyoung.com/twentysidedtale/?p=16736&cpage=1#comment-291263

Pretty much my view on that.

Probably the best way to look at it. Good summary.

Working at Valve is being in New York, there is nothing you can't do

Cyfu:
Hmmm, this is kind of creepy.. This morning I started thinking I should try to start getting into making games and now this happens? Could this be a sign?

anyways, this is kind of scary. If valve continue as they are doing now, you have everything you need on steam and that's not good at all.

Captcha: end of the world. Yes captcha, this might be the end of world as we know it.

That's strange, I feel fine.

I trust Valve not to fuck me over. They had not failed me yet, why would they now?

As long as they're sticking with gaming related software, I can see it fitting with the theme of the Steam service.

Nothing really prevents them from branching out even further, though, but I think it's good to have a niche and not branch out too much.

I still can't understand why 3D Mark costs so much money. It feels like one would only want to use it for giggles once per new computer to measure the size of your epeen, but what's the point after that?

I'm pretty sure I downloaded a driver update via steam at one point, so non-game software has been on steam before now too.

I just hope that I can register my current copy of Artrage Pro there soon. Save me the trouble of using a damn disc.

Steam has had Indie Game: The Movie for sale for a few months, as well as Source Film Maker. Saying that the service "now" offers non-gaming software is not really news.

Now saying that it "offers artistic software beyond Valve games" is more accurate. By the way, I really don't mind that these animation and painting programs are around, as long as they aren't deliberately shoved in my face.

You know what the hidden, most amazing thing about these programs are? They have Achievements.

Thats right.

Gamemaker studio has Steam achievements like, "10 Debugs" "Compile Error" and "Run Mac" that are exactly what they sound like. Gamifying making games. Steam never ceases to amaze me.

Rainforce:
A monopoly in the making, indeed.
This is fucking creepy to watch, considernig how my favorite game distribution platform is now growing into other markets not quite unlike cancer.
But maybe I'm just afraid of change here.

I think you are. Or rather, buying far too much into the alarmist bullshit peddled by a lot of Valve-haters around here. That article included. I remember reading it before. I knew it was bullshit then. I know it's bullshit now.

The failures in basic logic throughout the article (and indeed with most arguments levied against Valves "monopoly"), are often telling. They make one thing abundantly clear. The author, and many who think like him, appear to be unable to grasp what the words "monopoly" and "anti-competitive" actually mean.

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/monopoly
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/anti-competitive

Valve does not strong arm developers and publishers into using their service. Game makers are not required to use Steam for distribution on the PC. At no point is a game required to be exclusive to Steam; something that happens often with consoles. Even if a developer does use Steam, they are not required to use Steamworks.

Any suggestions to the contrary are ludicrous. (and illustrates a lack of perspective)

The fact of the matter is, Steam/Valve are successful as they are because they offer a better, more powerful, more convenient, and more robust service to gamers and developers than their competitors do.

This is why so many gamers and designers use the service. Not because Valve has a "monopoly". Nor are they ever likely to.

As such, this new non-game software addition to Steam should be viewed as a good thing. It shows Valve is still dedicated to expanding their set of services and titles available to the customer. It shows they are still trying to better the service and remain competitive.

That's not something to be afraid of. That's something to embrace.

What we should be afraid is the fact that Valves primary competitors are still unwilling to do the same all the while lambasting Steam for being "too good". And seeing the gaming community at large agreeing with them.

DVS BSTrD:
Working at Valve is being in New York, there is nothing you can't do

Except "legally" buy crack and kill hookers.

But fear not! That new legislation is all but assured to go through. ;)

Already installed Game Maker 9 and while the previous versions looked like shit this one look actually kind of neat, it even has some tutorials in it since most of what can be found online are also shit.

No, no, I want less Steam-DRM, not more. I guess as long as the software is still available elsewhere there's no reason to worry, but I doubt it'll stay that way. That's how they started out with gaming after all and now a bunch of games are only released on Steam or require a Steam account even if bought as a physical copy.

Andrewtheeviscerator:
Dota 2 isn't developed by Valve its published, all Valve did was buy out the guy who made the original Dota.

Actually Valve did develop Dota 2, they hired IceFrog as the lead designer. IceFrog is also not the guy who made the original DotA. That was Eul. IceFrog is just the one who took over from Steve Freak and now has been working on DotA: Allstars the longest.

Andrewtheeviscerator:
CS:GO was just a HD upgrade so I would hardly call that a new game,

Sure, it's not like it plays differently than CS and CS:S or anything. Or that it has multiple new weapons, levels and game modes. Nah, perish the thought.

and Dota 2 isn't developed by Valve its published, all Valve did was buy out the guy who made the original Dota.

No, it is developed by Valve. Unless you think one guy ported the game to the Source engine, created all of the art assets, designed and play tested the game alone, etc. I'm not sure you could sound like you knew less about what you're talking about if you tried.

So here's some facts, and I'll even ignore expansion packs from other companies for this one: Valve has been making at least one game a year since 2004. You could argue that L4D is a bit iffy since it was being made by another company originally who they then bought and then split off again after it was released, but even ignoring that, the years where they released multiple games kind of balances that out.

Valve do make games. They make them all the damn time. Just because you either don't like what was released or aren't aware of the amount of stuff they make in house won't change that. But talking out your ass about it certainly does seem to demonstrate that regardless of the reason, you don't know what you're talking about.

They want $20 for 3DMark now then... hah, it's not like there are a billion free contenders for that.

OT: Well it was bound to happen sooner or later, and while it is good for raising awareness you get the worst possible deal with all these products.

Hurray we can now add more DRM to our software!

Good on them. If they think there's a market for them, go for it.

lancar:
I still can't understand why 3D Mark costs so much money. It feels like one would only want to use it for giggles once per new computer to measure the size of your epeen, but what's the point after that?

Because the people that make 3dmark and assorted art tools are fucking idiots. It's not like pirated 3dmark software isn't out there. 3d mark should be at best 5 bucks, and the art tools should sell for 20. The increase in sales on that would more than make up for any loss from the cost drop.

Evil Smurf:
I trust Valve not to fuck me over. They had not failed me yet, why would they now?

I trusted EA no to fuck me over back in the day. They still haven't screwed me personally but I've heard loads of stories from everybody else(plus the usual stories of incompetent marketing).

Point is Valve is a company just like EA, Activision or Ubisoft.

Vivi22:

Andrewtheeviscerator:
CS:GO was just a HD upgrade so I would hardly call that a new game,

Sure, it's not like it plays differently than CS and CS:S or anything. Or that it has multiple new weapons, levels and game modes. Nah, perish the thought.

It has 3 and a half new weapons and 2 new grenades, one of the weapons is actually useful and the grenades are also quite neat.
Other than that it has a bunch of reskins. Reskins worse than those Source fans made 5 years ago.
And yes
It has a few new levels and game modes, I won't go into them because I suppose modes like arms race is fun for those coming from CoD or gungame/deathmatch servers so I feel they do have their place. They just recently added a new map for de_ I think it was, until then all the de_ and cs_ maps were old ones. But the problem I have with GO is that most of this new stuff doesn't really add all that much new for those who like the more serious and semi-competitive aspect of the game.

I still think it was worth the money and they do quite a few good things, like more money per kill with SMGs, less money per kill with AWP and possibly a few other things I've missed.

All in all though; I still think it has it's place and is well worth the 10€.

Also, someone seemed to mention GO when talking about Valve games; for those who don't know yet, they just published it, the development was done by Hidden Path.

As for the new software; I don't mind, but what they had when I checked yesterday wasn't really impressive considering about a third of their offering was 20€ e-peen measurement devices.
Not sure if I'll use the software part all that much, but I don't really mind.

I have to say, GM isn't completely pointless once you plug in a good third party graphics engine DLL. Ogre (the Torchlight engine) has been adapted to work with it, and the results can be pretty neat.

That said, overall Unity seems a much better choice for Steam integration. I hope they consider adding it to their toybox soon.

Vigormortis:
Snip

While they may not be strong arming the dev/publishers, they are indirectly strong arming the consumers. When the Steamworks DRM goes into a game, that is free to the devs/publishers, the consumer has no option but to use it. As far as I am concerned that is fairly anti-competitive because if a game has it you have to use it. For example, as far as I know their is no version of Skyrim without it, as such get it in retail, you have to use steam, no ifs ands or buts. How can that not be seen as anti competitive for the consumers?

Anyone else noticed gamemaker has achievements?

That's... really something. I'm not sure what it is, exactly, but it's something. (I wonder if we could improve workplace productivity by adding achievements to MS Office?)

kiri2tsubasa:

Vigormortis:
Snip

While they may not be strong arming the dev/publishers, they are indirectly strong arming the consumers. When the Steamworks DRM goes into a game, that is free to the devs/publishers, the consumer has no option but to use it. As far as I am concerned that is fairly anti-competitive because if a game has it you have to use it. For example, as far as I know their is no version of Skyrim without it, as such get it in retail, you have to use steam, no ifs ands or buts. How can that not be seen as anti competitive for the consumers?

Easy. It's not "anti-competitive" because it doesn't bar the developer from releasing the game on other platforms or other services. The Steam version of Skyrim having Steamworks integration doesn't negate the possibility of the game making it's way to, say, the XBox, Playstation, or even the MAC. And, as you can plainly see, it is already present on those platforms. Well, two of them anyway.

The example you're trying to use is more akin to, and I HATE to use yet another car analogy but, Fords use of the Sync system.

As a potential car buyer, I may be interested in having a vehicle with the Sync hands-free system. Much like someone may be interested in getting Skyrim on PC.

However, I will quickly discover that I can only get Sync if I purchase a car made by Ford. This is because Microsoft programmed Sync for Ford cars only.

This is not the same with Skyrim. Bethesda made the game independent of Valve's involvement. It was only during the design process that they decided to have the PC release be Steam exclusive. It was not made specifically for Steam, they simply saw a feature-rich environment within that platform that worked well for what they wanted to do. Besides, the PC build was designed along side the console builds.

Regardless, neither case is an example of anti-competition. As defined, anti-competitive means: "tending to reduce or discourage competition". Offering a service a competitor does not offer is NOT "discouraging competition". It is, in fact, the very definition of pure competition. It means one is attempting to offer something the competitor does not.

In this sense, Bethesda looked at it's options and decided it wanted to use the Steam platform as it's primary distributor for it's PC build of the game. That did not, again, mean they still couldn't release the game on other platforms. See my first paragraph.

This is also not a case of "strong-arming the consumers". Would you accuse Epic Games of strong-arming players, seeing as it's made Gears of War effectively exclusive to the Xbox360? Most would not. But, what Epic did with the Gears of War series IS strong-arming. If you want to play the game at all, you HAVE to get it on the Xbox360.

If you don't want to play the Steamworks version of Skyrim, you can still play it elsewhere.

So, once again, for the last time, Steamworks (and indeed Steam as a whole) is not anti-competitive. The real problem is most of Steams competitors are...well...not competitive. They want Steams success without going through the trouble of making a service that caters to gamers and developers.

 Pages 1 2 NEXT

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Registered for a free account here