NASA's Voyager 1 May Have Left Our Solar System

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Monsterfurby:

Racecarlock:

Yes, I'm sure the species that still has the KKK and problems with gay people can totally handle space aliens.

To be honest, I am quite convinced that eventually WE are going to turn out to be this galaxy's Borg/Reapers/Shadows/Nephilim/Skirineen/Ur'Quan/Yuuzan Vong/Shak'turi/Dread Lords/ID4 Aliens. (Extra points for naming all the sources these appear in.)

Just saying, nuclear weapons are not something you automatically discover before you get to space flight...

Shit, man. That's a real possibility. We've already practiced it among ourselves. Take a look at what we did to the Indians, not to mention the holocaust and other tragedies throughout history.

If Earth turns into the galactic partyhouse, it would be much better than what could have happened (and probably better than what we deserve).

Its a pity it does'nt have better or more updated analysis equipment on board seeing as it is still transmitting data. The IR and UV spectrometer's were powered off in 2010 as far as I know, just short of the goal and they would have given first hand info on the chemical composition of interstellar space. Still some data is better than none and its still a milestone all the same.

FantomOmega:

They don't make them like they used to

image

The Voyager is the Nokia 3310 of it's day

Wtb.

Anyways, OT: Fantastic. The article, the spacecraft, the news, the physics, the revelations, NASA, existence itself... Just, fantastic. Thank heavens for the heavens. We're all pretty pro.

And they say we should stop this stuff... Damn... Uh-uh, nuh-uh, should not happen.

No. Stop. Come back.

Despite this, there are still three factors that most scientists agree would consitute [sic] evidence of an exit from our solar system if a craft experienced them in tandem. First, the craft would have to experience an increase in collisions from charged particles found in interstellar space. Second, the rate at which solar particles collided with it, irrespective of where these particles might be going, would have to drop dramatically. Finally, the craft must be able to detect a change in the direction of the magnetic fields surrounding it; once the craft is beyond the grasp of our sun, the fields around it should shift to reflect the direction of magnetic fields in interstellar space.

It's truly amazing that a probe launched back in 1975 (you know, back when we thought digital watches were pretty neat and desktop computers were science fiction) is still sending back meaningful data after all this time. Detroit still can't build a car that will last half that long even with regular maintenance. Way to go, NASA!

Alandoril:
Surely the end of our solar system is the orbital path of the last planet? I mean that would seem logical.

You'd think right but not quite. I think orbits are measured through the center of the planet so there is still the negligible distance of the planet and its atmosphere. However if you follow recent conventions pluto would lie outside our solar system under this system (what with it being no longer a planet - curse you astronomers!). It also eliminates any other non-planetary bodies that orbit beyond the final orbit.

I think the best definition and the one their going with, is the area where the sun's gravitational pull is no longer the strongest gravitational force out there.

DugMachine:
image

This is awesome. Now we have a better chance of aliens finding it, coming to earth and taking us off this rock to have cool space adventures.

Or destroying everything in their path to find Voyager's creator.

Basically, this is where I'd put my Horcrux.

Go Voyager!

NightHawk21:

I think the best definition and the one their going with, is the area where the sun's gravitational pull is no longer the strongest gravitational force out there.

No, the definition they're going with is when the sun's solar wind doesn't push strongly enough against the interstellar wind. It's called the heliosphere.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heliosphere

Monsterfurby:

Just saying, nuclear weapons are not something you automatically discover before you get to space flight...

Just saying, of all the species we know that have attained spaceflight, yes they are.

wait....is that hyperspace?
image

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