iOS Game Explores the Afterlives of Foxconn Suicides

iOS Game Explores the Afterlives of Foxconn Suicides

In a Permanent Save State invites players to reflect on suicide at China's most infamous tech factories.

Foxconn is a word we all recognize for one horrible reason: Over the past few years, a total of nineteen workers have committed suicide while employed by Foxconn factories, with an understanding that factory working conditions were at least partly to blame for the pain felt by these workers. These factories produce components for various pieces of tech, including video game consoles, that form increasingly important parts of our lives. In an attempt to get consumers to really think about what all of this means, independent developer Benjamin Poynter has released an iOS game that invites players to move through artistic interpretations of the afterlives of seven of the nineteen Foxconn suicide victims.

Available now for iOS, In a Permanent Save State has grand artistic and philosophical ambitions. Its iTunes listing says that, "The interconnected narrative [In a Permanent Save State] tells sheds nameless perspective upon the Western spectacle vs. the Eastern dream. Furthermore, has a root in cultural truisms which define the aesthetic and faith for those involved. There is an effort made to deconstruct these notions and the video game form itself. Those who assemble the dreams of this world now have their own at a devastating cost."

It's an intriguing idea, and its slightly detached, philosophical bent should ensure that it won't get booted from iTunes like Molleindustria's iPhone manufacturing game Phone Story. Poynter has described the game by saying that it "serves as a memorial and return of the Western Dream back to the East from where the ideal of spectacle of home entertainment is possible."

The game is being released in tandem with an exhibition created by Poynter that poses similar questions. Do you ever wonder if one of the suicidal workers had a hand in creating your phone or your laptop? It's an incredibly uncomfortable thing to think about, but it's important that we do. If games like Phone Story and In a Permanent Save State encourage more people to do that, well, more power to them.

Source: GamePolitics

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Hevva:
"The interconnected narrative [In a Permanent Save State] tells sheds nameless perspective upon the Western spectacle vs. the Eastern dream. Furthermore, has a root in cultural truisms which define the aesthetic and faith for those involved. There is an effort made to deconstruct these notions and the video game form itself. Those who assemble the dreams of this world now have their own at a devastating cost."

I'm sorry, but I have no idea what this means.
Either way, I guess it's cool to have a memorial for those workers. Their, er, sacrifice, will be noted?

captcha: thank you. You're welcome, captcha.

I saw the article link's title and almost start laughing thinking it was a game about the soul of a former Foxconn employee who committed suicide before realizing just how horrible that would be...

BUT seeing what the game, er program/application(?), actually is...well it's not clear, but it seems to be making a decent statement/memorial

Is there irony in playing it as a game on an IOS device most likely manufactured in china?

Or that their memories live on through the very things that drove them to kill themselves?

Wow our world is F***ed up sometimes.

Hevva:
Do you ever wonder if one of the suicidal workers had a hand in creating your phone or your laptop?

Far too often for my own good, I fear. Although batteries are perhaps scarier; I can't remember exactly what they mine to make them(lithium? can you mine that?), but the mines in China are absolutely dreadful. I wonder how many miners have died and how much environment the mining slag has damaged simply to bring us batteries for, well, mostly cameras and electric cars I think. Don't think the stuff they mine is used in regular AA batteries and whatnot.

These guys are sensationalist morons. I never worked at Foxconn, so I can't say for sure, but the numbers tell a different story. The suicide rate in China is 22.23 per 100k people. 19 Deaths in 2 years for a company that employs 400k+ people, statistically, they are far below the national average, Also, having such a large work force they are very likely to have people who suffer from a mental disorder that would make them see suicide as a way out of... whatever they feel like they are trapped in. On top of that you have various third parties saying the conditions were bad, but you have just as many other third party agencies saying they were fine or good working conditions.

/end rant

On Topic: I think a game that exploits this is ridiculous, even as an artistic vision.

"The interconnected narrative [In a Permanent Save State] tells sheds nameless perspective upon the Western spectacle vs. the Eastern dream. Furthermore, has a root in cultural truisms which define the aesthetic and faith for those involved. There is an effort made to deconstruct these notions and the video game form itself. Those who assemble the dreams of this world now have their own at a devastating cost."

This doesn't say anything or describe anything other than the authors ability to vomit out words and say literally (and literarily) nothing.

whats that, Phone Story?


ah yes, the ban...

Wait, I am so confused... What the fuck do you do in this game?!

Also, how do you play it?

Is it available in the US? I tried looking it up on iTunes and I cannot find it...

cricket chirps:
Is there irony in playing it as a game on an IOS device most likely manufactured in china?

Or that their memories live on through the very things that drove them to kill themselves?

Wow our world is F***ed up sometimes.

We have no idea. No fraking kidding. "Do you ever wonder if one of the suicidal workers had a hand in creating your phone or your laptop?" Why,yes I do. Kinda ironic,really in a "Oh Dear God,why?!" kind of way. But in all seriousness,it's horrible what happened there. Art style kinda reminds me of The Dishwasher:Vampire Smile. Which is good. Good Lord. Gives new meaning to "Ghost in the shell",huh?

glitch388:
Is it available in the US? I tried looking it up on iTunes and I cannot find it...

I think it's safe to say it's been banned by Apple sometime earlier.

I'll look for it. Then buy it.

GamerMage:

cricket chirps:
Is there irony in playing it as a game on an IOS device most likely manufactured in china?

Or that their memories live on through the very things that drove them to kill themselves?

Wow our world is F***ed up sometimes.

We have no idea. No fraking kidding. "Do you ever wonder if one of the suicidal workers had a hand in creating your phone or your laptop?" Why,yes I do. Kinda ironic,really in a "Oh Dear God,why?!" kind of way. But in all seriousness,it's horrible what happened there. Art style kinda reminds me of The Dishwasher:Vampire Smile. Which is good. Good Lord. Gives new meaning to "Ghost in the shell",huh?

speaking of which, i'm fairly sure that at some point we'll find out that these things are actually powered by the souls of the dead

Daaaah Whoosh:

Hevva:
"The interconnected narrative [In a Permanent Save State] tells sheds nameless perspective upon the Western spectacle vs. the Eastern dream. Furthermore, has a root in cultural truisms which define the aesthetic and faith for those involved. There is an effort made to deconstruct these notions and the video game form itself. Those who assemble the dreams of this world now have their own at a devastating cost."

I'm sorry, but I have no idea what this means.

I know what you mean, these quotes...It's like trying to read an English translation of a book written by A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada; Pretentious English.

Reminiscent of The Cat and the Coup, though seems a little more advanced, ah the interesting things we can do with games.

...and banned.

http://www.theverge.com/2012/10/12/3495466/apple-bans-another-objectionable-iphone-game-about-foxconn-workers

Altogether though, Apple banning the game was unsurprising.

The big problem with the entire Foxconn issue is that the real, industry-wide issues got lost in the sea of link-bait headlines and sensationalistic, mud-racking articles (basically, pinning the entire responsibility for Foxconn on a single company for the sake of generating revenue through page-views).

 

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