10-Year-Old Borrows Steamy Gay Sex Manga From Local Library

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Playful Pony:

Holy shit, WOMEN have fantasies? SEXUAL fantasies?! *mind blown*

But seriously... My male friends find female gay sex super hot. I don't see anyone raising an eyebrow when a guy talk about how totally sexy that is. Women have sexual urges and fantasies too. Shocking, I know.

Woah, hold your horses! (Sorry, I've been waiting to use that one =D)

To be fair, it's not exactly common knowledge or expected of women to fantasise about men bumping uglies. I only know one girl who (at least admits) to finding two men kissing attractive, but people sincerely asked if I was heterosexual when I said I don't find two women kissing attractive. Hell, most women I asked were repulsed at the idea because they felt it emasculated at least one of the men involved, and we can't have men going around being weak little queerosexuals now, can we? *Grumble grumble*

An 8 year old can pick up a copy of The Bible in the local school library.

Reveras:

FelixG:
Well, they are really opening themselves up for a suit for providing pornography to minors arent they.

I figure they should stock most kinds of things, but giving visual pornography to pre-teens is a bit much IMO

Read the response from the KCLS. They are in the right here, what he complains about is even stated in the Parental Responsibility Policy. The fact that they have a wide variety of things in stock doesn't affect the fact that he's a closed minded parent that didn't supervise his child.

Do you really think that this parent (or not parent, as the case may be) really is in the wrong here?

The little girl was 10, obviously too young for the material, and yet she was able to get to it easily. The parents have a responsibilty to their children's welfare, but at the same time, if you ask your daughter where she got the big stack of comic books from, and she replies "in the comic books section of the library", do you then go through every single one to make sure they're all on the up-and-up?

The complainer didn't buy it, nor get it for his niece. she picked it up, probably by herself, from the libaray, a public building. KCLS is most certainly not in the right here, and their "oh, you should've been more careful, because it's not OUR job to properly categorise our books" is just arrogant and stupid. Imagine if a video store put pornography out on the general shelves, and then told parents it's THEIR fault when their child picks one up?

LazyAza:
Parent failed to be a parent, you should ALWAYS pay attention to what your children are picking up at a library, video store, game store, whatever. Ratings and labels exist for a reason, use them.

Also, hang around outside their school during lunch so they don't get into fights or bullied, and do their homework for them.

I not sure how to address this, but I'm siding with the Library on this one. If you are going to ban adult non-fiction material (graphic novel or otherwise) for being pornographic, why stop there? Why not add the soft porn material like romance novels? Why not ban rated-R videos that have a nudity scene? Why not ban National Geographic magazine?

It's not the first time a kid was interested in racier material. Nor is it the Librarian's duty to play babysitter for your child, as they have enough duties that they actually get paid for. I remember reading Stephen King's "Four Past Midnight", which had a pretty explicit "Sandusky" scene. And I was about 11 years old at the time. Of course it was inappropriate for me to read, but then again...I wasn't the intended audience.

Point is, children are always going to try and access stuff intended for more mature audiences, whether it be adult books, movies, or video games. It's up to the parent to reign in how much their child is exposed to, not the institution they drop them off at.

Edit: Sorry, I had the wrong SK novel. Been awhile since I picked up one of his books.

Playful Pony:
I don't really think the library is at fault here. The parents responsible should really keep an eye on the books their kids take home with them. After all you wouldn't allow them to watch whatever they wanted on the TV, would you? You'd check to make sure they didn't watch something unsuitable. It's not the TV's job to do that. You wouldn't let your kid search up whatever pictures and videos they felt like online.

Zack Alklazaris:

For those of you who might be unfamiliar with the term, "yaoi" is used to describe fiction that focuses on male homosexual romance marketed towards the ladies. The genre, which is dominated by female authors, is known for romanticizing aggressive and sometimes non-consensual sex. It's sometimes gets a bit rapey, in other words.

So... women fantasizes about guys forcibly and sometimes violently having sex with each other?

Holy shit, WOMEN have fantasies? SEXUAL fantasies?! *mind blown*

But seriously... My male friends find female gay sex super hot. I don't see anyone raising an eyebrow when a guy talk about how totally sexy that is. Women have sexual urges and fantasies too. Shocking, I know.

Oh I know I'm married to woman who loves these fantasies, I just didn't realize that particular fantasy was so popular there was a whole pop-culture around it.

EDIT: I really don't go by the whole female on female thing that guys love so much. As a guy... I just don't get it. So I tend not to try and compare it to fantasies women would have.

Kind of surprised that people are comparing an adult comic to an adult book. Don't you think one is a significantly bigger deal than the other?

Writing about sex and showing sex are pretty different and I am still kind of surprised items like this just don't have a warning show up when they swipe the barcodes, so they cannot be given children. I just can't see how any responsible librarian can give a 10 year old an adult manga with graphic sex scenes -- that they haven't lost their job is pretty shocking to me.

I mean how is the parent supposed to know they even had it, if all the child had to do is tuck it away somewhere and read it in private? Even if the parent came with them to the library, what is to stop the child from simply going alone (I used to do this after school all the time)?

What is honestly different from this situation than a 10 year old walking into a news agent and buying a Playboy or even a Hustler magazine? Would we still blame the parent here?

AnnaIME:
I am a librarian. This is the kind of ethics thing we discuss all the time.

Should we have literature with unsavoury sexual content? If not, do we bann Nobel prize winner Elfriede Jelinek? If we allow her books because she is so obviously "art", where do we draw the line? Are books like "50 shades" OK? Is it OK as long as there are no pictures? And what about racism? There are so many books that are horribly racist, but get a free pass because they are classics, or just historically accurate.

It comes down to why we have libraries, and what guidelines are set up for that particular library. A school library has a goal different from a local library branch, or a national library. The limits are set by what kind of library it is, and what the library budget will permit.

There is also the matter of sooooo many people, both adults and children, thinking that anything with drawn pictures in it is for children. And funny.

A good librarian helps you find what you want, even if you did not know it existed. At one library where I worked, we were explicitly forbidden to even frown if someone wanted to check out something we thought might be unsuitable, out of respect for the client and her right to choose her own information. (We also had to smile and explain this when the angry parents or teachers complained.)

Blood Brain Barrier:
As I see it, this isn't about library borrowing policy but stocking the book full stop. After all, a kid doesn't have to borrow the book to read it - plenty of people go to the library to read without borrowing. So either they stock the controversial books or they don't. I don't know about everyone else, but I would rather they do. Libraries shouldn't tell people what they should be reading.

Judging by what this guy wrote and said, he is more interested in getting this kind of material out of the hands of kids, by, say, putting it in an "adults only" section, along with books like 50 Shades of Grey or other "raunchy" material.

The Library's response feels like nothing more than an eloquent middle finger to someone who is simply trying to look out for the wellfare of his niece and other children. "We can stock what we want, dipstick, and it's up to you to make sure that your child doesn't check out an adults-only manga amongst all the others that, apart from the parental advisory sticker, look more-or-less identical to every other manga to the untrained eye."

Totally on the side of the library.

The point of a public library is that everyone should have access to the information. It doesn't serve that mission statement to decide what is and what is not appropriate information, even for a little girl.

The simple truth is there are all kinds of literature that a parent may deem inappropriate for their child that simply cannot be easily classified as "adult" by the library. And even if you could, and stopped them from checking it out, how do you stop them from reading/seeing it in the library itself if you are letting the child roam unsupervised.

And, as they mentioned that these were catalogued different, you have to believe the child went in search of this and it wasn't an accident. I suspect this isn't the child's first foray into yaoi, just the first time the parent caught wind of it.

Take responsibility as a parent.

Well I think somebody goofed up. It being a comic book I'm not sure what the law says about first amendment protection like books have so maybe it's a bit shaky legally. The library or the parents shouldn't have let her get her hands on it so easily. Though it's not the end of the world really. I don't know if it's anyone in particular's fault though I guess the library will keep an eye out for things like this in the future.

Maybe it was put in the wrong section (perhaps even the children's section) by mistake as it looks like a comic. When I used to work in a library well meaning, or lazy, customers would move books around, and just put them wherever and mess the whole system up.

Azuaron:
But you'll notice that theaters aren't allowed to let kids into rated R movies without an adult, and stores aren't allowed to sell M or AO games to minors.

Perhaps, but that's just their policy. It's not the law. They don't HAVE to not allow kids to see R rated movies, but most places have the company policy of not doing that. At least in the US. Here in the UK I would have been, metaphorically, fucked by the law had one 14 year old seen a boob when I worked at a cinema.

I'm on the side of... oh wait this isn't a binary court of law I can blame them both.

Yeah, everyone spouting arguments on either side is missing the bigger picture that fault can be easily divided here.

Zhukov:
This article upsets me.

Mostly because I have no idea how to pronounce "yaoi".

I mean, three vowels and a "y"? Come on, what the hell?

In case you still haven't figured it out, it's pronounced yow-ee.

Also I would have to side with the library in this case, since its pretty clearly marked as explicit content. And who the hell would let their 10 year old walk around a library unattended?

Here's a thought, put the porn on the top shelf so the little shits can't reach it. Yet another one of society's problems solved.

My library registers your age to your card account, so the "check-it-yourself" terminal won't let you take out a 13+ or 18+ item if you aren't old enough.

I kinda staggered over the KCLS answer "[...]All non-fiction titles, including children's non-fiction, are shelved together.[...]"

That means TRANSMETROPOLITAN would be stashed along with THOMAS THE TRAIN.

That's irresponsible and unbecoming of a public library.

I wonder if the kid used the self checkout and if this isn't the first instance of her checking out these manga.

Slycne:
I'm on the side of... oh wait this isn't a binary court of law I can blame them both.

Yeah, everyone spouting arguments on either side is missing the bigger picture that fault can be easily divided here.

Pff, killjoy.

Bhaalspawn:
My library registers your age to your card account, so the "check-it-yourself" terminal won't let you take out a 13+ or 18+ item if you aren't old enough.

Could be possible if the kid was using the parents card. Granted, I'm not sure, it's been over a decade since I've gone to the library.

thenumberthirteen:
Well I think somebody goofed up. It being a comic book I'm not sure what the law says about first amendment protection like books have so maybe it's a bit shaky legally. The library or the parents shouldn't have let her get her hands on it so easily. Though it's not the end of the world really. I don't know if it's anyone in particular's fault though I guess the library will keep an eye out for things like this in the future.

Maybe it was put in the wrong section (perhaps even the children's section) by mistake as it looks like a comic. When I used to work in a library well meaning, or lazy, customers would move books around, and just put them wherever and mess the whole system up.

Azuaron:
But you'll notice that theaters aren't allowed to let kids into rated R movies without an adult, and stores aren't allowed to sell M or AO games to minors.

Perhaps, but that's just their policy. It's not the law. They don't HAVE to not allow kids to see R rated movies, but most places have the company policy of not doing that. At least in the US. Here in the UK I would have been, metaphorically, fucked by the law had one 14 year old seen a boob when I worked at a cinema.

My mind has been blown... I've been under the impression that restricting minors from R movies was law, but apparently not (though, according to Wikipedia, "There is a new law that has been passed and enforced since 2009 where children under the age of 12 are strictly prohibited from viewing the [R rated] film." But I can't find any other information on this law, so...)

However, reading up on it more, this seems to be a "voluntary" policy only in the sense that blackmail is "voluntary". Without the MPAA, the government would take (and has taken in the past) legal measures.

But, and this one I feel I'm on firmer ground, pornography can't be distributed to minors according to the law.

I think the library is completely in the wrong in this case, and their reason for being wrong is stupid and misguided.

The title checked out, "Hero Heel 2" was catalogued as Adult Non-Fiction. All non-fiction titles, including children's non-fiction, are shelved together.

While I can understand their reasoning for keeping children's and Adult Non-Fiction in the same place and not preventing children from taking out Adult Non-Fiction, after all who are they to stand in the way of learning if a child wants to learn about history, read an atlas or encyclopaedia, however the library is completely misguided and foolish to believe that gay sex Manga is Non-Fiction, that Hero Heel 2 is a truthful, historical account of the brutal and "rapey" sexual encounters of two real world, living, breathing Animé characters.

As far as I can see, the library dropped a bollock in mis-catagoirising Hero Heel 2 as Non-Fiction and rather than own up to their mistake (if indeed they even realise it), they're trying to excuse their action with talk of ethics, freedom of information and not censoring a child's opportunity to learn. It's like the spokesman for the library didn't even look at the comic or case in question and gave his answer based entirely on principles.

Non-Fiction, really? The person responsible for this needs to get their head out of the books and open their eyes.

Playful Pony:
I don't really think the library is at fault here. The parents responsible should really keep an eye on the books their kids take home with them. After all you wouldn't allow them to watch whatever they wanted on the TV, would you? You'd check to make sure they didn't watch something unsuitable. It's not the TV's job to do that. You wouldn't let your kid search up whatever pictures and videos they felt like online.

This.

I'm so sick and tired of everyone looking for someone or something else to blame rather than taking a tiny amount of responsibility themselves.

It's like parents going berserk over Grand Theft Auto as "I didn't realise how bad the game was!" really... the big 18 sticker on the box or the pictures of violence on the back? so now you want to blame the shop or publisher -_-.

Or as you say letting a child browse the internet without any restrictions or supervision it's just poor parenting :/ but no no we can't say that we must blame the internet.

My library has similar books. Used to check them out all the time when I was 12-13. I didnt show anyone though. I'm not stupid.

http://www.mangahere.com/manga/angel_sanctuary/
Angel Sanctuary, that was one of the longer series I read. Huge amount of gay sex and incest and all that. Also angel and demons and reincarnation and stuff.

Well, I'm seeing some "It's the library's fault!" in the thread here, and while yes, it is illegal to supply a minor with pornography, I'm still siding with them.
A ten year old should not be unsupervised in the library. That's irresponsible.
The library is not responsible for the content of its material: the public is.
Age restrictions do not serve the public: I myself was reading adult-level books in 4th grade.
Pornography is hard to qualify: Is it nudity? goodbye, horror. is it explicit sex? goodbye A Clockwork Orange, and all nc-17 films!
Does this book actually show anything? Most yaoi is incredibly non-explicit when it comes to showing the sex. Even if the scenes aren't skipped entirely, there is almost never anything visible when it comes to the actual sex acts.
And finally, the policy warns you.
The only thing I'm seeing as their fault is that somehow it was tagged as non-fiction. Yaoi is only slightly less realistic than hentai in its depiction of sexual behavior

Heh. I thought you said it contained two "garden-variety bushes engaging in 'rather violent' sex". I was just thinking, what other kind of bushes are there? They're typically in a garden. And I can imagine it's violent sex, all they have is sharp roots. Though they do have lots of hard wood.

Anyway... I think it's fine she checked it out. No reason to get up in arms.

This old chestnut. Its not the first time this has happened with manga, since its been gracing library shelves. But like all those other times, I have to back up the libraries on this one.

Parents, its your responsibilty to vet what media your kids consume, tough job but only you can do it. Having an objection to yaoi (pronounced 'ya-oi') manga being in a library isn't going to fly, when 50 Shades of Gray is also available, is lapped up by adult females (the same audience for yaoi) and given the red carpet treatment, because its a text novel. This yaoi book has a parental advisory label on it, so its doing its part that what's inside, may not be suitable for a younger audience.

Manga has done some great things for the comic medium, by pushing the bounderies, in a similar to many indie/creators owned comics. The regular people on the street still unfortunately see it as stuff for kids, and how wrong they are.

Sounds to me, that this is more of a 'gay's are evil (not true), so why are there comics about them, in our good library' witch hunt. The moment they start sensoring and burning books, I'm afraid they'll have to stoke the fires with 50 Shades trilogy, too. I'm amazed that such hypocrisy still exists that whatever is produced in text, gets a pass, but if its drawn, then its somehow a problem, and more corruptable.

As for such a yaoi book, take a moment to talk to your child about it, and why they shouldn't be reading it.

I really don't see the problem here....

Grey Carter:

"KCLS will not limit children to the use of books in the children's section of the library, as these materials may not meet the needs and interests of all children. In addition, library staff is not responsible for determining whether materials used by children and teens are "age appropriate."
These policies are not unique to KCLS. They are consistent with public library policies across the United States.

Quoted for truth.

Anyway, good for KCLS! That father was absolutely in the wrong. The only person he has to blame for what his daughter is reading is himself - for not looking at what she'd checked out sooner.

Also - 20 years ago, when I was a preteen girl, I could (and did) walk into my library and check out romance novels.

You think Yaoi is bad? Read a proper harlequin romance novel sometime.

Everyone's all "oh god, it has pictures!" - yeah, drawings. Who cares? Yaoi still has to avoid graphic nudity and explicit sex to avoid being actual porn. Novels don't.

The dad needs to grow a pair and realize that his daughter is going to read books about sex. She's even going to HAVE SEX* (if she wants to). Seriously, Mr. De Nevers, grow the fuck up.

*In about five more years, but still.
And yes, I added this in case anyone misunderstood and thought I meant immediately.

Zachary Amaranth:

LackingSanity:
Presumably the adult fiction section is actually separate from the children's section, which might make it a little less likely for younger kids to pick it up in the first place.

Presumably, so is adult non-fiction, which this was categorised as.

All non-fiction titles, including children's non-fiction, are shelved together.

Doesn't look like it. All non-fiction together.

Is there a romance section of the library in question (or at least a good number of romance novels)? Yes?

Then why the fuck should this manga be treated any differently?

I'm afraid I'm on the side of the library here: If they clearly state that it isn't their business what kids check out...Maybe the parents should be checking out the books on behalf of their kids instead, yeah?

As far as I can see, even if it's pornographic in nature, it still has artistic value and wouldn't be labelled "obscene" in a (functional) court of law. Meaning it can't be withheld from children by the law alone, and this library clearly is using the same definition of obscene as the Miller Test, which is legal precedence in the United States. On top of this, the majority of manga avoid specifically showing the genitals or penetration, making them racy in nature but not "full-blown porn."

Is it that hard for a librarian to notice an adult only sticker and tell a 10 year old kid that she can't borrow it unless she has her parents with her or something?

I also dont see a problem here it was clearly labelled but people can buy (borrow) whatever books they want I dont believe it has the same age restrictions as games (which most people couldnt care less about it seems) and Films (which people still ignore on a regular basis) and nor should they in my opinion once we start saying who can read what and when and what books are appropriate for whom we start to go into dangerous territory.

It also seems the library complied with their policy the parent obviously dosent like it but just because hes butt hurt dosent make him in the right, if he cares so much you can restrict what those under your responsibility read make the call on a personal level not as a blanket decision all books should remain open for all regardless of their supposed suitability and worth.

Azuaron:
My mind has been blown... I've been under the impression that restricting minors from R movies was law, but apparently not (though, according to Wikipedia, "There is a new law that has been passed and enforced since 2009 where children under the age of 12 are strictly prohibited from viewing the [R rated] film." But I can't find any other information on this law, so...)

However, reading up on it more, this seems to be a "voluntary" policy only in the sense that blackmail is "voluntary". Without the MPAA, the government would take (and has taken in the past) legal measures.

But, and this one I feel I'm on firmer ground, pornography can't be distributed to minors according to the law.

Don't you remember the fuss a couple years ago when the supreme court ruled on the first amendment protection of videogames? Books and movies are protected speech, and so the government, cannot under the constitution, stop people from seeing them except in extreme situations.

Zhukov:
This article upsets me.

Mostly because I have no idea how to pronounce "yaoi".

I mean, three vowels and a "y"? Come on, what the hell?

I believe the phonetic pronunciation would sound something like "Yow-ee".

I'm squarely in the library's corner. I find it rather amazing that libraries have, over the past decade+, have repeatedly shown themselves to be willing to defend privacy and free, open access to information where so many others crumble at the slightest hint of resistance; especially when children are involved.

The only issue I'm confused about is manga being shelved as "non-fiction". I would think that it would be shelved in a comic books and graphic novel section within Fiction, further divided into eastern and western graphic novels and so forth. Mayhap this is a typo?

That said, I'm very glad the library operates under the policy it does. It is the parent's responsibility to decide what the child is able to read. Most libraries (at least, around here) have an available "Kids section only" card as well as an "adult/full" card which permits borrowing from anywhere - though, I perhaps wouldn't object to them offering a third "general" classification which provides access to more than a kids-only section but not everything. If you want to restrict your kid without having to actually monitor what they're reading, get them a kid's only library card. Otherwise, it takes a bit of work.

I'm worried that this kind of thing is going to cause a backlash that affects at very least manga and graphic novels, if not other library content. It would be a complete logistical and practical nightmare for libraries to have to decide "This is adults-only content, while this is general content". Every day there would be some "crusader for decency" claiming that X book/manga/video etc... needs to be filed away behind the dark curtain. Where would you put nearly the whole "Romance" section? Bodice-rippers? What about violent content? Someone would be ranting even about non-fiction books on the Occult, for instance. Non-fiction war-crimes books with say, pictures of internment and concentration camps? People have so many different views about what is "adults only" content that library staff wouldn't have time to do anything but deal with these complaints.

I'm gathering this is more of a bias because it is a graphic novel versus a text-only novel. I can remember back in my "tweens" in the 90s, a young lady I fancied lent me one of her favorite books from the library - written by Poppy Z. Brite. Though completely in text, this book contained hardcore, homosexual acts that were sometimes mixed with violence and non-consensual (ie drugged) states. Had the offended uncle's niece come home with this book instead of manga, would he still be crying that the library should have sequestered it away so that even a child with a "full, adult" library card couldn't check it out?

I'm a great proponent of libraries as repository of information, art, culture, and entertainment, regardless of medium. Especially for those with lower incomes, libraries are sometimes one of the only methods of accessing knowledge and entertainment outside of their neighborhood bubble. Especially in an age where there are many who hate anything "public" in the US, libraries should have demonstrated usefulness - not just as silent cobweb-wearing archives of classic texts, but a wide variety of media that is informative, entertaining, enlightening, and enjoyable for all sorts of preferences. I don't want to see this squashed with more "Think of the children" rhetoric. Libraries do their part by offering restricted and unrestricted borrowers/access cards; parents need to do the rest.

TheRealCJ:

Reveras:

FelixG:
Well, they are really opening themselves up for a suit for providing pornography to minors arent they.

I figure they should stock most kinds of things, but giving visual pornography to pre-teens is a bit much IMO

Read the response from the KCLS. They are in the right here, what he complains about is even stated in the Parental Responsibility Policy. The fact that they have a wide variety of things in stock doesn't affect the fact that he's a closed minded parent that didn't supervise his child.

Do you really think that this parent (or not parent, as the case may be) really is in the wrong here?

The little girl was 10, obviously too young for the material, and yet she was able to get to it easily. The parents have a responsibilty to their children's welfare, but at the same time, if you ask your daughter where she got the big stack of comic books from, and she replies "in the comic books section of the library", do you then go through every single one to make sure they're all on the up-and-up?

The complainer didn't buy it, nor get it for his niece. she picked it up, probably by herself, from the libaray, a public building. KCLS is most certainly not in the right here, and their "oh, you should've been more careful, because it's not OUR job to properly categorise our books" is just arrogant and stupid. Imagine if a video store put pornography out on the general shelves, and then told parents it's THEIR fault when their child picks one up?

I'm going to side with the library here. When I was that young, my parents did, in fact, look at everything I was going to check out. Because, you see, that was their job. It's not a popular position nowadays, but it is the job of the adults in a child's family to see to it that the child is supervised and raised correctly. It is not the place of the library to make value judgements on the content of the books on their shelves. The library shouldn't even be expected to know what is in each book, there are too many books in the average collection for that.

Perhaps the adult here should have taken a quick look at the stack of manga the young lady was checking out and said "Whoa, wait a second young lady. Do you know what is in this one?" when he saw the sticker, or even the cover. The cover alone should have caused him to check the book before letting the girl check it out. In fact, it sounds like he did look at the books before his niece read them, so no harm was done (assuming one is asinine enough to believe a child would come to harm by seeing drawings of (gasp!) SEX happening). I just maintain that the books should have been vetted by a guardian before checkout, thereby nipping this problem in the bud.

My only beef here is that the comic was filed as non-fiction. Umm, since when is a manga of this nature non-fiction? Sounds like a fiction book to me. If anything, I'd think that graphic novels and comics should have their own classification, separate from both fiction and non-fiction, much as music and films have separate sections. It's too big a literary field, with many traits unique to it. It encompasses both fiction (it's largest area) and non-fiction, with most genres contained within, from fantasy to modern drama. It really should be in a different place altogether.

Ah, I find things like this hilarious. As soon as I saw the title, I KNEW this would be good. A kid accidentally looks at porn in a public place, parents freak out saying that the porn shouldn't be there in the first place, and the officials come back saying that they should keep a closer eye on their kid and mind their own fucking business. In all honesty, I'm really on the side of the latter. The library wants to keep a variety of material for *everyone* and if a kid goes somewhere they shouldn't, that is THEIR problem, not the library's.

"Your rights end where other's rights begin." Pretty good quote if you ask me.

Magefeanor:
Is it that hard for a librarian to notice an adult only sticker and tell a 10 year old kid that she can't borrow it unless she has her parents with her or something?

Read the article. They have a policy on it, and that's pretty much: "Parents, it's your fault, if your kid borrows something they shouldn't. We don't put artificial restrictions on material just 'cause you fail to watch them."

I'm definitely with the library on this. If a 10-yo kid is given free access to a library, you should know what they have access to and not expect someone else to keep them "protected". Protect them yourselves, or teach them that it's a no-no, rather than calling out a library for a policy they publicly have.

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