Printable Gunmaker About to Test in Texas

 Pages 1 2 3 NEXT
 

Printable Gunmaker About to Test in Texas

image

The Wiki Weapon gunmaker claims it has almost all it needs, bar one permit, to start printing off pistols.

Last time Defense Distributed popped up on the radar, it was in connection with its 3D Printer, which manufacturer Stratasys had yanked from Defense Distributed as soon as it realized that the so-called Wiki Weapon gunmaker actually intended to carry through its plan to print off prototype pistols. Defense Distributed has overcome that hurdle, and now intends to complete its project in Texas.

Two Texas companies loaned Defense Distributed the technology it needed to finish its prototype and, in order to make sure the legalities were dealt with, the gunmaker applied for, and expects to be granted, a federal firearms license. Barring accidents, the prototype pistols should be in production and ready for testing before Christmas.

Cody Wilson, Defense Distributor's founder, claims that the project is all about individualism. "I'm really not some guy that's just trying to get everybody to print out a bunch of guns and roll out," said Wilson in an interview with Animal New York. "This is simply about, hey, look at your printable future."

The WikiWep blog further outlines the intent of the project, as part of a resistance against the established order. The blog post discusses a patent granted to the Invention Science Fund, intended to prevent printers from carrying out instructions unless the appropriate authorization code was attached to the CAD plan, essentially creating DRM for 3D printers. Said the blog post:

These patent hoarders and manufacturers believe they can fence you in through force of law. And when patents like FDM finally approach expiration, the praetorians of the old order will ensure their monopolies are enshrined for another lifetime. Their friends in government will help them.

Not a moment to lose.

Defense Distributed has applied to become a nonprofit organization, with the stated goal of "charitable public interest publishing." In other words, it intends to eventually distribute printable gun schematics free of charge.

Source: Guardian

Permalink

May as well be Made in China.

Ink must cost a fortune.

Defense Distributed has applied to become a nonprofit organization, with the stated goal of "charitable public interest publishing." In other words, it intends to eventually distribute printable gun schematics free of charge.

I can see no possible way that this could go wrong. God Speed, Defense Distributed. God Speed.

[/sarcasm]

Guns, resistance against the established order, and praetorians of the old order? Yeah... I support getting rid of DRM and reforming copyright law, but printing guns and babbling about suppression performed by governments seem a bit paranoid. Especially considering that Defense Distributed talked about armed revolutions earlier this year.

Everyone in N. America - "Huh, cool."
Everyone outside of N. America - "WHAT THE HELL IS WRONG WITH YOU PEOPLE?!"

Printable guns... where's my ride off this planet.

There is only one type of magazine I want to see printed, and I don't see Newsweek or National Geographic anywhere on that thing.

I'm really not some guy that's just trying to get everybody to print out a bunch of guns and roll out

...Yeah I want everybody to print out my guns and roll out" :P

But, but,

intended to prevent printers from carrying out instructions unless the appropriate authorization code was attached to the CAD plan, essentially creating DRM for 3D printers.

DRM is never breakable right? This has no way of being cracked and then used for mass production, right?

These people really don't seem all there, somehow they imagine this idea stands for everything they find wrong in the world.
Maybe first sit down and collect your thoughts and then make some printable shit.

I think you are overreacting. this is more a benchmark or proof of concept test. A gun has to deal with something that starts at room temperature and then jumps suddenly to hundreds of degrees while simultaneously creating a massive amount pressure and kinetic force and do it more than once. The same technology that can print a gun can also print a satellite that can survive the force needed to put it into orbit or self combustion engine parts in the future. Before we debate the morality of making a printable pistol I do wish to remind you that Wernher Magnus Maximilian, Freiherr von Braun made V2 rockets for Nazi Germany but went on to make the Saturn V for NASA. It is not science or technologies fault for what people decided to do with it. Right now we are communicating through the Internet which was originally designed to allow Generals to communicate even if under nuclear attack but today is used for commerce (legal and otherwise) and entertainment (mainly porn and kittens), all things the original architects never imagined.

I'm watching with a sort of worried fascination here. I'm in favor of innovation, and the concepts used - should this succeed - will open up all sorts of interesting applications elsewhere. On the other hand, it also has the distinct potential to create a widespread proliferation of unregistered weapons that could disrupt our nice record-low armed violence rates in the US. Guess we'll see how it hashes out in the long run.

JarinArenos:
I'm watching with a sort of worried fascination here. I'm in favor of innovation, and the concepts used - should this succeed - will open up all sorts of interesting applications elsewhere. On the other hand, it also has the distinct potential to create a widespread proliferation of unregistered weapons that could disrupt our nice record-low armed violence rates in the US. Guess we'll see how it hashes out in the long run.

An increased supply of guns does not increase the rate of crime, if you were to look at the gun crime rate in Europe before and after the inaction of gun laws you would see that the rate remained the same. Guns do not cause crime, if they did Switzerland would be a backwater hellhole.

I'm interested in this because honestly a gun is one of the most complex pieces I can imagine coming out of a 3D printer. If it works, that's a good sign that 3D printing technology is actually moving from novelty to actually useful.

Unregistered weapons will keep those who wish to use theirs for ill from knowing where the guns of citizens are. And it will break fascist monopoly on weapons.

BabySinclair:
But, but,

intended to prevent printers from carrying out instructions unless the appropriate authorization code was attached to the CAD plan, essentially creating DRM for 3D printers.

DRM is never breakable right? This has no way of being cracked and then used for mass production, right?

Someone might of cracked DRM? Someone call Ubisoft there products are no longer safe!

Cause thats what texas needs, more easily obtainable guns :D

Remember when improved mass production meant everyone could get knives cheap and then we all got stabbed to death? Those days sucked.

Rigs83:
I think you are overreacting. this is more a benchmark or proof of concept test. A gun has to deal with something that starts at room temperature and then jumps suddenly to hundreds of degrees while simultaneously creating a massive amount pressure and kinetic force and do it more than once. The same technology that can print a gun can also print a satellite that can survive the force needed to put it into orbit or self combustion engine parts in the future. Before we debate the morality of making a printable pistol I do wish to remind you that Wernher Magnus Maximilian, Freiherr von Braun made V2 rockets for Nazi Germany but went on to make the Saturn V for NASA. It is not science or technologies fault for what people decided to do with it. Right now we are communicating through the Internet which was originally designed to allow Generals to communicate even if under nuclear attack but today is used for commerce (legal and otherwise) and entertainment (mainly porn and kittens), all things the original architects never imagined.

This ^

I doubt it's even possible yet, to print an actual firing gun without it blowing itself up or failing completely. Maybe better to just let them have it, loose some fingers, and go back to the drawing-in-blood-using-your-stump board. Metal just can't be 3D printed and maintain the required density and properties and geometric accuracy to produce a workable firearm.

I like the concept of people now, or soon being able to produce advanced items in their own homes that would normally cost an arm and a leg to make. Things like prototypes for personal inventions, or art, or even custom chess pieces, but producing a gun with a 3d printer just seems like... kind of waste of potential and dangerous. I am afraid that just the rumor that someone could make a functional gun (unlikely due to previously stated mechanical issues) would cause lawmakers to create a restriction on people's ability to get a 3D printer.

Kopikatsu:

Defense Distributed has applied to become a nonprofit organization, with the stated goal of "charitable public interest publishing." In other words, it intends to eventually distribute printable gun schematics free of charge.

I can see no possible way that this could go wrong. God Speed, Defense Distributed. God Speed.

[/sarcasm]

If not them, someone else. Might as well see what happens

This technology has a lot of potential in any number of applications. Unfortunate that one of the first things we're doing with it is making more tools to kill each other with, but that's true of many modern advancements (the world wouldn't know half of what it does about medicine or aeronautics if not for the nazis. Very sad statement on humanity, but true regardless)

No technology so cool that some jackass won't try to find an irredeemably irresponsible use for it.

So, maybe the "printable gun" won't be all that effective. Maybe it won't survive the shock of more than one or two shots, even.

What does the market for a disposable weapon that only survives one or two uses look like?...

So, your options: a highly inaccurate 'gun' that fires at best one or two shots if it doesn't blow up in your hand first and requires careful construction as well as access to proper ammunition, or an easily accessible stabbing/cutting implement called a 'knife' or 'pair of scissors' that you can find in almost every kitchen, is very easy to use and never runs out of ammunition.

Which is more dangerous?

Who said anything about this gun being disposable? Most guns these days are made of ceramics, plastics, and/or metal, and industrial 3D printers can handle all of those materials. The main issue will be the resolution of the barrel, and my guess is that they will simply bore out the printed barrel to smooth the edges and add rifling.

Aureliano:
So, your options: a highly inaccurate 'gun' that fires at best one or two shots if it doesn't blow up in your hand first and requires careful construction as well as access to proper ammunition, or an easily accessible stabbing/cutting implement called a 'knife' or 'pair of scissors' that you can find in almost every kitchen, is very easy to use and never runs out of ammunition.

Which is more dangerous?

Pffff, knife? Scissors? You have hands, do you not? They never run out of ammunition, and you don't even have to go looking for them if you want to bash someone!

I suppose they're the most dangrous of them all!

On a more serious note, no, the gun is still more dangerous, both to the wielder and whoever might find themselves on the wrong end of it.

Aureliano:
So, your options: a highly inaccurate 'gun' that fires at best one or two shots if it doesn't blow up in your hand first and requires careful construction as well as access to proper ammunition, or an easily accessible stabbing/cutting implement called a 'knife' or 'pair of scissors' that you can find in almost every kitchen, is very easy to use and never runs out of ammunition.

Which is more dangerous?

the gun, due to danger to the operator, and if it does manage to squeeze off a round, if it was properly aimed, something is going to break violently, whether that be some vase or someone's bones or heart.

Knives have a very definitive area of danger, which can be reacted to and dodged or blocked or otherwise rendered not-dangerous by a LOT of people, with little (notice how i didn't say no) skill required. very few can dodge the shrapnel from an exploding gun, or can dodge bullets.

skilled knife users are always dangerous. skilled gun users more-so, but you dont need skill to use a gun, even if it is a 1 shot thing.

I think that it is amazing that 3D printing has advanced to the stage that we can now construct more complex machines.

But such technology is being wasted on creating handguns...

Rigs83:
-snip-

Yeah, but I don't think a company called Defense Distributed running the 'Wiki Weapon' project is planning to make satellites.

Because what the world needs is more easily available ways to senselessly murder. *facepalm*

AldUK:
Everyone in N. America - "Huh, cool."
Everyone outside of N. America - "WHAT THE HELL IS WRONG WITH YOU PEOPLE?!"

Printable guns... where's my ride off this planet.

pretty much this, americans are perhaps the most frightening species this planet has ever produced. i do not fear climate change or nuclear annihilation or weapons in general... i fear an american with his hand on the trigger/button

captcha: "end of the world"

no shit captcha

spectrenihlus:

JarinArenos:
I'm watching with a sort of worried fascination here. I'm in favor of innovation, and the concepts used - should this succeed - will open up all sorts of interesting applications elsewhere. On the other hand, it also has the distinct potential to create a widespread proliferation of unregistered weapons that could disrupt our nice record-low armed violence rates in the US. Guess we'll see how it hashes out in the long run.

An increased supply of guns does not increase the rate of crime, if you were to look at the gun crime rate in Europe before and after the inaction of gun laws you would see that the rate remained the same. Guns do not cause crime, if they did Switzerland would be a backwater hellhole.

The rate of crime doesn't change, but the ability for it to escalate does. But I wasn't trying to fearmonger here. I don't expect the worst out of this by any means, and I suspect he has more hurdles to clear than we think, anyway. And if it wasn't this guy, it would be someone else doing it quietly instead of making a big deal of it, which could be far worse. I'm honestly curious to see how this ends up.

Contrary to what most people here think, I believe more or less functioning revolver could be made
Print most parts out of most durable plastic the printer can handle
Takes metal tubes and springs for some parts that need even more strength (and adjust them)
Put parts together, lubricate necessary parts and load the revolver
Accuracy would be asinine and it would break down pretty soon, but you would have revolver that most probably could withstand ~12 shots

Either way this printer would be awesome for cosplayers
Just imagine how much simpler would be to make full body "armor" with such printer

I say good on them. It's certainly creative, although I'm not sure guns were the way to go as an exemplar of the possibilities of 3D printing.

O maestre:

AldUK:
Everyone in N. America - "Huh, cool."
Everyone outside of N. America - "WHAT THE HELL IS WRONG WITH YOU PEOPLE?!"

Printable guns... where's my ride off this planet.

pretty much this, americans are perhaps the most frightening species this planet has ever produced. i do not fear climate change or nuclear annihilation or weapons in general... i fear an american with his hand on the trigger/button

captcha: "end of the world"

no shit captcha

lol YOLO bro!

OT: Its a gun.
A gun needs ammo to be used....
And it's made out of plastic....
And it is more likely to harm the user than anyone else...
...
Honestly, any knowledgeable person with a machine shop could (at the very least) come out with a similar piece,

AldUK:
Everyone in N. America - "Huh, cool."
Everyone outside of N. America - "WHAT THE HELL IS WRONG WITH YOU PEOPLE?!"

Printable guns... where's my ride off this planet.

N. American Engineering student - "This is one of the more interesting things I have seen in the past few weeks. I wonder if the printers will be special in any way or if I could run this on a Reprap?"

Honestly I understand the concern, the last thing i want is unregistered firearms available to a wide swath of the population, but despite my best efforts the mad engineer inside of me already has plans on my mental drawing board with my internal gun nut peering over his shoulder offering advice.

TopazFusion:
Let me know when we have the ability to print a nuclear bomb.

Technically, we do.

Not too many years ago did that unemployed scientist try to build a working reactor in his kitchen. Until, the most understanding police in the world, shut him down (and gave him a warning). If you have access to a lab (where protocols are very lax), you could set up experiments that essentially duplicate the Manhattan Project.

Note, I did say technically. Honestly, I am a bit surprised Iran does not already have a "device", I guess work is slowed because Israel and America WILL bomb the site until 'not a stone is left upon a stone'.

 Pages 1 2 3 NEXT

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Register for a free account here