Cadbury Crafts Heat-Resistant Chocolate

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Cadbury Crafts Heat-Resistant Chocolate

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Cadbury's new creation can withstand tropical temperatures for hours.

The beautiful thing about science is that it has applications in every walk of life. Want to send a man to the moon? Get thee to an astrophysicist. Need help curing cancer? A friendly molecular biologist might have some tips. Are you really upset that your chocolate bar keeps melting before you can sink your teeth into its luscious, velvety exterior? Cadbury's got you covered. The British confectioner has created a kind of chocolate that can last for hours in tropical temperatures, without any unappetizing drawbacks.

Chocolate - especially milk chocolate - gets its distinctive flavor from cocoa butter, a fat that melts at around 95 F. Since the average human mouth is about 98 F, this means that chocolate will melt during its consumption, making for a tasty, textured treat. The downside, of course, is that many places on Earth exceed 95 F on a regular basis. A chocolate bar in a hot place will often become a congealed mass of goo long before reaching its target's mouth. By refining its products just after a process known as "conching," Cadbury has created a chocolate bar that can withstand a temperature of 104 F for up to three hours at a time. The precise mechanics of conching still puzzle food scientists, but the process aerates the chocolate, redistributes the fat particles, reduces acidity, and removes moisture. Conching can be time-consuming, but actually has a positive effect on the final product's flavor and aroma in addition to its heat resistance.

Heat-resistant chocolate has actually been around since the 1930s, when scientists developed a nutritious chocolate bar that soldiers serving in tropical areas could consume. Similar confections accompanied the Apollo 15 astronauts to the moon, and the U.S. military to the Gulf War. Historically, these sweets had to be mixed with fillers like flour, fats, or even water, which lent them a waxy taste and gritty texture.

Cadbury hopes to sell its new product in tropical markets, where consuming chocolate bars outside has traditionally been a short-lived proposition. However, even temperate zones could benefit from this advancement, as anyone who's ever left a candy bar out on the counter during the summer can attest. Now if food scientists could figure out a way to prevent crisped rice from going stale, we'll really be in business.

Source: gizmag

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Marshall Honorof:

Heat-resistant chocolate has actually been around since the 1930s, when scientists developed a nutritious chocolate bar that soldiers serving in tropical areas could consume. Similar confections accompanied the Apollo 15 astronauts to the moon, and the U.S. military to the Gulf War.

Whoa, whoa, whoa. Where can I get some of those? Gorging myself on healthy chocolate sounds awesome.

We're all missing the important thing here...

It also has a new shape, and we all know that the new shape makes it taste better.

And thus begins the spread of the obesity pandemic to Latin America......

Wait wait wait, if chocolate is soft and chewy because it melts at 95 degrees, and our mouths are 98, doesn't that mean the chocolate will never be soft and chewy unless you leave it outside for a few hours?

Feast your eyes on this beauty.

image

It is a rare sight for you Americans indeed.

The rest of the world calls this 'chocolate' :D

charge52:
Wait wait wait, if chocolate is soft and chewy because it melts at 95 degrees, and our mouths are 98, doesn't that mean the chocolate will never be soft and chewy unless you leave it outside for a few hours?

Not as chewy I imagine, but who likes slightly melted chocolate anyway? Plus I imagine the act of chewing will change speed up reaction time, as more of the chocolate bars surface area will be available.
Anyway, this is pretty cool, not especially useful, but pretty cool.

Daystar Clarion:
Feast your eyes on this beauty.

image

It is a rare site for you Americans indeed.

The rest of the world calls this 'chocolate' :D

We have these things:

Meh. I love it when chocolate melts in my mouth, when it doesnt i usually keep it in my mouth till it does. Seeing chocolate that doesnt melt in mouths makes me a little sad :(

Kopikatsu:

Daystar Clarion:
Feast your eyes on this beauty.

image

It is a rare site for you Americans indeed.

The rest of the world calls this 'chocolate' :D

We have these things:

Lindt is Swiss, Godiva is Belgian.

Herschey's is the only American one in that list, and their chocolate tastes like what I imagine tepid cat vomit to taste like, just like most American chocolate :D

Sizzle Montyjing:

charge52:
Wait wait wait, if chocolate is soft and chewy because it melts at 95 degrees, and our mouths are 98, doesn't that mean the chocolate will never be soft and chewy unless you leave it outside for a few hours?

Not as chewy I imagine, but who likes slightly melted chocolate anyway? Plus I imagine the act of chewing will change speed up reaction time, as more of the chocolate bars surface area will be available.
Anyway, this is pretty cool, not especially useful, but pretty cool.

I don't mean slightly melted chocolate.
Let's have an example, for this, we will use Hershey's chocolate bar. When taken out of say a fridge, the inicial bite is solid, which usually causes a small noise. Now when you chew it, it becomes chewy, if it didn't it would be like eating a chocolate carrot essentially.
Another non-chocolate example would be star burst. Now if star burst was hard, it would be tough to chew, and not nearly as enjoyable as star burst when it is soft.
Is this making sense?

Daystar Clarion:

Kopikatsu:

Daystar Clarion:
Feast your eyes on this beauty.

image

It is a rare site for you Americans indeed.

The rest of the world calls this 'chocolate' :D

We have these things:

Lindt is Swiss, Godiva is Belgian.

Herschey's is the only American one in that list, and their chocolate tastes like what I imagine tepid cat vomit to taste like, just like most American chocolate :D

I didn't mean they were American. You said 'This is what the rest of the world calls chocolate', but we have ridiculous amounts of stores selling Godiva and Lindt chocolates. Maybe even more than Hersheys. I know that Macy's has quite the selection of Godiva chocolates and they're a department store.

...Besides, I like Hershey's. It's a lot more waxy than other chocolates, but that's why I like it...

cocoa butter, a fat that melts at around 95 F

35 C

average human mouth is about 98 F

36 C

places on Earth exceed 95 F on a regular basis

35 C

can withstand a temperature of 104 F

40 C

Just to be a pain in the ass. :P

OT: Interesting...when you think about it, the melting problem does close off a lot of markets for chocolatiers.

I like to keep my chocolate bars in the fridge before I eat them anyway, but this would be nice for some I guess.

Now if only they could produce chocolate that didn't need to be refrigerated.

Kopikatsu:

Daystar Clarion:

Kopikatsu:

We have these things:

Lindt is Swiss, Godiva is Belgian.

Herschey's is the only American one in that list, and their chocolate tastes like what I imagine tepid cat vomit to taste like, just like most American chocolate :D

I didn't mean they were American. You said 'This is what the rest of the world calls chocolate', but we have ridiculous amounts of stores selling Godiva and Lindt chocolates. Maybe even more than Hersheys. I know that Macy's has quite the selection of Godiva chocolates and they're a department store.

...Besides, I like Hershey's. It's a lot more waxy than other chocolates, but that's why I like it...

You like your chocolate 'waxy'?

o_0

...

Must... not... judge

I would rather if they spent the money making the chocolate bigger not reduced in size...

Daystar Clarion:
Feast your eyes on this beauty.

image

It is a rare site for you Americans indeed.

The rest of the world calls this 'chocolate' :D

sight*

hehehe

OT: I love science :3. I want to eat these during the baking hot summers here in England. YES WE DO HAVE BAKING HOT SUMMERS! SHUT UP!

lRookiel:

Daystar Clarion:
Feast your eyes on this beauty.

image

It is a rare site for you Americans indeed.

The rest of the world calls this 'chocolate' :D

sight*

hehehe

OT: I love science :3. I want to eat these during the baking hot summers here in England. YES WE DO HAVE BAKING HOT SUMMERS! SHUT UP!

Derp, I just noticed that -_-

Something is wrong with me today.

charge52:

I don't mean slightly melted chocolate.
Let's have an example, for this, we will use Hershey's chocolate bar. When taken out of say a fridge, the inicial bite is solid, which usually causes a small noise. Now when you chew it, it becomes chewy, if it didn't it would be like eating a chocolate carrot essentially.
Another non-chocolate example would be star burst. Now if star burst was hard, it would be tough to chew, and not nearly as enjoyable as star burst when it is soft.
Is this making sense?

Well, chocolate out of the fridge isn't chocolate at room temperature, so it wouldn't be like that. Normal chocalte id' say, just a little harder to melt.

In the same vein, didn't some company claim that they could produce bread that lasts up to 60 days without going bad?

Kopikatsu:

Marshall Honorof:

Heat-resistant chocolate has actually been around since the 1930s, when scientists developed a nutritious chocolate bar that soldiers serving in tropical areas could consume. Similar confections accompanied the Apollo 15 astronauts to the moon, and the U.S. military to the Gulf War.

Whoa, whoa, whoa. Where can I get some of those? Gorging myself on healthy chocolate sounds awesome.

Sorry, but it's nutritious, not healthy. While it does have some benefits over regular milk chocolate, it's very high in energy (calories), made for high-intensity activity. We had the same thing in the army. It's basically pure energy, to give you a boost at times when you don't have the time to eat something else.

Anyway, this is a good thing, next: chocolate with proper chocolate taste, and as healthy as broccoli. That would be sweet (pardon the pun).

image
Delicious Flameshield.

no one is going to argue about what you said.
and even if it fails to protect you, they will all be too bussy to find things to fondue the shit out of it, giving you a safe retreat.

thats genius.

I've corrupted all my american friends by bringing dairy milk to them. They now actively search out the imports.
XD

But this is good news! I noticed when I tried dairy milk in south east asia it tasted... Well far from how it should taste.

So then, is a person who is about as useful as a chocolate teapot just that little bit more useful now?

Ok a ten year old came up with this a few years ago in the UK, so that our troops in Afghanistan could have chocolatly goodness

Erm... just a slight correction: Though it's a common misconception, Cadbury's are not actually purveyors of chocolate. They are actually a dairy company specialising in the production of cheap, easy to produce cheese for the masses. A lot of people get this confused, but rest assured, with all the hydrogenated fats and chemicals that go into Cadbury's Dairy Milk, cheese is the only definition which truly fits.

Now this, on the other hand, is chocolate:

image

Daystar Clarion:
Feast your eyes on this beauty.

image

It is a rare sight for you Americans indeed.

The rest of the world calls this 'chocolate' :D

Hmm... my good sir, while I wouldn't hesitate to call that a particularly fine looking block of sweet Cheddar, or perhaps a kind of Brown Lancaster, I would hardly call that chocolate. That would be like calling Jack Daniels whiskey, when everyone knows it's premium industrial engine fluid...

Daystar Clarion:
Feast your eyes on this beauty.

image

It is a rare sight for you Americans indeed.

The rest of the world calls this 'chocolate' :D

Don't lie to them dude. Dairy Milk is gone forever, and this monstrosity is wearing its skin:

DJjaffacake:

Daystar Clarion:
Feast your eyes on this beauty.

image

It is a rare sight for you Americans indeed.

The rest of the world calls this 'chocolate' :D

Don't lie to them dude. Dairy Milk is gone forever, and this monstrosity is wearing its skin:

As far as I can tell, they haven't changed the recipe.

Daystar Clarion:

DJjaffacake:

Daystar Clarion:
Feast your eyes on this beauty.

It is a rare sight for you Americans indeed.

The rest of the world calls this 'chocolate' :D

Don't lie to them dude. Dairy Milk is gone forever, and this monstrosity is wearing its skin:

As far as I can tell, they haven't changed the recipe.

Maybe I'm imagining it, but it tastes more like Mars chocolate than Cadbury's to me now. And Mars on its own tastes like the faeces of STD ridden baboons.

I probably put too much thought into that simile

Tbh the brand does exsist in America but they don't acutally make the chocolate the same over there, its more kraft-like. To be honest hope we get less regional limetations down the line lets share the gift of chocolate in all its glory across the blobe :D

Also on a side note lets be happy that the crazy mainland euro types didn't win the battle about real chocolate (in name that is) needing animal fat to be called chocolate as Cadbury's does not and never has. More info in link.

http://consumerist.com/2010/11/29/pure-chocolate-does-not-exist-eu-court-rules/

Ha. Your move, Willy Wonka!

Hot chocolate mod anyone?

Kopikatsu:

Daystar Clarion:
Feast your eyes on this beauty.

image

It is a rare site for you Americans indeed.

The rest of the world calls this 'chocolate' :D

We have these things:

We have 'em too, and the Hershey bars blatantly suck scrotum. You need some class, boy.

Chrono212:

cocoa butter, a fat that melts at around 95 F

35 C

average human mouth is about 98 F

36 C

places on Earth exceed 95 F on a regular basis

35 C

can withstand a temperature of 104 F

40 C

Just to be a pain in the ass. :P

OT: Interesting...when you think about it, the melting problem does close off a lot of markets for chocolatiers.

Thanks for that, I was about to ask what on earth those crazy temperatures are for people that aren't American.

But this is ingenious. Science has truly created such marvelous things for us all. Although, sometimes I like when it melts.

First thing I thought of when I saw this was M&Ms (melts in you mouth, not your hands).

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