Rumor: New Torment Game in the Works

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Free advice. Rogue Dao Studios. Have a look.

I'm really ambivalent about this. I don't think I want Planescape: Torment 2.

I wouldn't mind a different story with different characters, based on similar themes as the original game and in the same setting, I think that would be interesting. But trying to market it as spiritual successor, that's not ok with me, Dragon Age: Origins was supposed to be "spiritual successor" to Bladur's Gate, and as much as I liked DA:O, I didn't feel my nostalgia being tickled.

They talk about new Torment, maybe not being based on D&D and probably not Planescape.
What.
For me, those two things were just as essential to the whole experience as the story itself.
"This is Planescape: Torment 2. It's neither Planescape nor second in the series, but you'll be very tormented!"

WotC likes the games to be developed using current rules, so maybe they should hold off on this game until D&D Next comes out. I playtested it, it's much better than 4. I'd prefer it being based on Pathfinder, but that would be even more trouble from WotC because...
The setting. Planescape is not supported anymore. Instead they shove that shitty magiteck down our throats, or even worse, Points of Light. So, maybe it'll be Eberron: Torment?
If they did it on Pathfinder, they wouldn't be able to use WotC settings at all.

Anyway, I'm not really surprised WotC doesn't want a Planescape game being made. It'd make people interested in a setting they don't give a damn right now, and since the complete overhaul of the cosmology they did, it actually has no reason to exist, despite Sigil kind of sort of still being there (what.). Which is sad.
I still house rule it, however.

Ok, my mind went places. Sorry.

TL;DR: Sort of want, but complain anyway.

"The first step in designing a new Torment story is to ask the primary question. I'm older than I was when I worked on Torment, and my questions now are different than they were. I have children now, and I look at the world through their eyes and through mine, and that's changed me - in fact, the intervening years have changed me so much that I have new answers for the central story in the original Torment," he continued. "So now that I know what can change the nature of a man, I ask: What does one life matter? ... and does it matter at all?"

I love this guy already. Maybe it explains why I loved the game.

Gosh now I'm full of questions. To people who've beaten the game, what's the answer to the question again? (to what can change the nature of a man). I forgot ;_;

Maybe a follow up could be a dating sim set entirely within the Pillar of Skulls?

Captcha - Marry Me, well exactly!

I'd be all over this if it was a game revisiting the Planescape setting, but considering that it wont, I can't say I particularly care about this news.

Though I would like to see more games like that one again, I liked that genre of game.

Absolutionis:

With Wizards taking the D&D franchise backwards trying to emulate WoW and Guild Wars, they had basically eliminated the Planescape setting and retconned most of the setting into obscurity. It's great to see there's a possibility of it coming back.

Maybe this positive force of Baldur's Gate, Planescape, and Ravenloft resurgence may also convince Wizards to sway away from this silly Neverwinter (not Neverwinter Nights, it's a marginally related D&D v4.2) push they are stumbling through and just get back to producing great campaign settings like Planescape, Spelljammer, Dark Sun, and Ravenloft.

I hate to be "That guy", but there's a staggering level of misinformation here.

Planescape got canned with 3rd Edition, eons before the "vidya-game friendly" 4e rules got anywhere near it. (Elements of it got attached to Forgotten Realms, along with Al-Qadim, and Oriental Adventures, while Ravenloft got a tie-in with both FR and Dragonlance. Spelljammer was Planescapes spiritual precursor, as I recall, with spaceships isntead of planar portals)

Baldur's Gate isn't an equivalent to Planescape or Ravenloft, the equivalent would be Forgotten Realms, which also includes Neverwinter (Both the Nights, and that horrid-ass Diablo clone thingy). None of these really dictate the style of a game either (Or well, Ravenloft sort of pushes into survival horror), they're just settings.

Seth Carter:

Absolutionis:

With Wizards taking the D&D franchise backwards trying to emulate WoW and Guild Wars, they had basically eliminated the Planescape setting and retconned most of the setting into obscurity. It's great to see there's a possibility of it coming back.

Maybe this positive force of Baldur's Gate, Planescape, and Ravenloft resurgence may also convince Wizards to sway away from this silly Neverwinter (not Neverwinter Nights, it's a marginally related D&D v4.2) push they are stumbling through and just get back to producing great campaign settings like Planescape, Spelljammer, Dark Sun, and Ravenloft.

I hate to be "That guy", but there's a staggering level of misinformation here.

Planescape got canned with 3rd Edition, eons before the "vidya-game friendly" 4e rules got anywhere near it. (Elements of it got attached to Forgotten Realms, along with Al-Qadim, and Oriental Adventures, while Ravenloft got a tie-in with both FR and Dragonlance. Spelljammer was Planescapes spiritual precursor, as I recall, with spaceships isntead of planar portals)

Baldur's Gate isn't an equivalent to Planescape or Ravenloft, the equivalent would be Forgotten Realms, which also includes Neverwinter (Both the Nights, and that horrid-ass Diablo clone thingy). None of these really dictate the style of a game either (Or well, Ravenloft sort of pushes into survival horror), they're just settings.

When I said 'resurgence', I meant Baldur's Gate: Enhanced Edition (video game), Planescape: Torment's successor (this game), and Castle Ravenloft (the board game).
No misinformation, just miscommunication.

As an aside, the 'horrid-ass Diablo clone thingy' was Baldur's Gate: Dark Alliance, not a Neverwinter Nights spinoff.

Planescape established not only Sigil, but an entire cosmology from Limbo, Mechanus, Abyss, Celestia, and the like. Planescape also introduced the Factions (Dustmen, Sensates, etc) that featured prominently in Torment.

The Planescape cosmology became D&D proper canon in 3rd Edition. "Manual of the Planes" even described Sigil and the planes in their Planescape form essentially making the campaign setting of Planescape unnecessary because it was assimilated into D&D proper. The only thing that got 'canned' were Modrons, and that made me really sad. The cosmology otherwise was pretty much untouched.

It was 4th edition that wrecked the cosmology and all of what Planescape made. Limbo got jumbled with the Abyss in the Elemental Chaos. Mechanus was gone. Celestia was in Spelljammer-land in the newly-made Astral Sea. Eladrin were shoehorned in everywhere they could. The Planescape setting, in it butchered and barely recognizable form was highlighted in 4e Manual of the Planes and DMG2.
The factions are also listed in some 4thEd adventures and Dragon "magazine".

If you're that interested in D&D settings, you should check them out sometime. You may learn a lot. They're not bad.

Fappy:
I never actually played Planescape: Torment (don't kill me!), but I have to admit that the design philosophy sounds interesting so far.

that's no reason to hide ....

I played and thought it was 'eh' put it down, and never looked back.

I might be able to enjoy it now, but i don't have the money or the inclination to give it another chance

THATS a reason to hide. But I shall not!

Anyway...

Good for them. Now if they can make it into the ... what ever it was ... that made the first one 'this great thing' they'll have another hit.

DVS BSTrD:
When I saw "Torment Game" in the title I thought: "Oh God not another article about Battlefront 3"
But this... I like this.

Huh, my thought was "Oh look! Even more daft Half-Life 3 conspiracy theories"

Thing is, while I never finished the game, I did watch a friend finish it, and there is no real logical sense for a sequel. Only if it is like NWN 1 and 2. Just further down a timeline.

Absolutionis:
Planescape established not only Sigil, but an entire cosmology from Limbo, Mechanus, Abyss, Celestia, and the like. Planescape also introduced the Factions (Dustmen, Sensates, etc) that featured prominently in Torment.

The Planescape cosmology became D&D proper canon in 3rd Edition. "Manual of the Planes" even described Sigil and the planes in their Planescape form essentially making the campaign setting of Planescape unnecessary because it was assimilated into D&D proper. The only thing that got 'canned' were Modrons, and that made me really sad. The cosmology otherwise was pretty much untouched.

It was 4th edition that wrecked the cosmology and all of what Planescape made. Limbo got jumbled with the Abyss in the Elemental Chaos. Mechanus was gone. Celestia was in Spelljammer-land in the newly-made Astral Sea. Eladrin were shoehorned in everywhere they could. The Planescape setting, in it butchered and barely recognizable form was highlighted in 4e Manual of the Planes and DMG2.
The factions are also listed in some 4thEd adventures and Dragon "magazine".

If you're that interested in D&D settings, you should check them out sometime. You may learn a lot. They're not bad.

Aye, the Planescape campaign setting was, for most intents and purposes, almost totally subsumed into the Greyhawk Campaign Setting as the Great Wheel Cosmology.
Or perhaps you could say the entire Planescape Campaign Setting was primarily appended to the Greyhawk Campaign Setting, with Planescape's Great Wheel representing Greyhawk's "local planar neighborhood" layout, and Greyhawk representing Planescape's most closely linked Prime Material Plane.

Technically, all of the different Prime Material Planes (The Forgotten Realms, DragonLance, Eberron, etc etc etc) are all connected to some part of the Great Wheel, in some way, but they all tend to have their own more closely connected "local planar neighborhoods"

DragonLance, for example, is connected more closely to The Abyss than anything else, but in the end it's the same Abyss as the one found associated with the Forgotten Realms, and Greyhawk. The same Infinite Abyss of Planescape's Great Wheel.

D&D gets more and more complex as you zoom out further and further to try and comprehend the fuller scope of the multiverse, and how all the various cosmologies fit together.

In the end, Planescape IS still around....it's just not actively supported ATM.

Fappy:
I never actually played Planescape: Torment (don't kill me!), but I have to admit that the design philosophy sounds interesting so far.

play it NOW!!!

the cult of torment know where you live

its such a unique setting on top of the idea of the character himself you could tell so many different stories

I'd rather just have a re-release alá Baldurs Gate Enhanced Edition. Don't think Planescape Torment needs a sequel.

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