Buy Every North American SNES Game Ever Made on eBay

Buy Every North American SNES Game Ever Made on eBay

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All 721 North American Super Nintendo games can be yours for just $25,000.

Human beings, as a species, are collectors by nature. In evolutionary terms, this means that it's been practical to hold onto items that have no immediate value (like a sharpened rock), because they may prove their worth somewhere down the line (when you need to craft a hunting spear). In news that might be relevant outside the hunter-gathering community, however, it means that one individual in Ohio spent years amassing a collection of every single Super Nintendo game that ever reared its head in North America. All good things must come to an end, though, and the collection is up for sale for the bargain basement price of $24,999.

These 721 games - which include beloved classics like Chrono Trigger, run-of-the-mill adaptations like Spider-Man: The Animated Series, and ignominious footnotes like Race Drivin' - are generally in good shape, considering that many of them are about two decades old. "By no means is this a pristine set," warns kaisetsuna, the seller. "There will be creases, there will be folds, there will be finger smudges." At the same time, 84% of the games come with manuals, and every single one comes with a box, save for those that never shipped with a box in the first place. In addition to assuaging aesthetic concerns, kaisetsuna has "manually cleaned every single game's PCB contacts, and tested them to ensure the games were fully working," and "tested every battery terminal with a multimeter and replaced any dead batteries." Finally, the eBay page lists a legend for every single game, describing the condition of its cartridge, manual, and box on a scale of 1-5.

Ladies and gentlemen of the top-hat-and-monocle crowd (or else anyone else with $25,000 burning a hole in his or her pocket) in the Columbus, Ohio area can inspect the collection themselves and pick it up if purchased. Anyone unwilling or unable to travel will have to dish out enough shipping costs to cover 400 pounds of videogames. The bad news is that shipping that much weight will cost an extra few hundred dollars, but the good news is that after buying a videogame collection that costs more than a decent car, it's only a drop in the bucket.

Source: eBay

Image: eBay

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At that price he might as well throw in a working SNES just to sweeten the pot, don't you think?

If I were rich I would definitely buy the entire collection. I'm a collector myself, so to own all NA SNES games ever made is like a god send.

I just wish I had the money. :(

I highly doubt every game in is worth the average 35 bucks that he's selling it for.

Most of them would only be worth 1-2 at most.

Man, that collection is awesome but that price... I don't think I'd ever be able to afford that.
Also, isn't that the guy who made the snes emulator bsnes? That would explain why he has such a huge collection.

Lvl 64 Klutz:
At that price he might as well throw in a working SNES just to sweeten the pot, don't you think?

True that. 25000 dollar, and not even a SNES included? What a lousy deal! D:

I'm also not so sure if this is worth the 25000 dollar price tag. I have to admit that it's pretty cool though.

Anyone have a title pop out of them from the snapshot?

Very bottom right hand corner, Legend of Zelda: Link to the Past, I think. Lost so many hours to that game.

Al-Bundy-da-G:
I highly doubt every game in is worth the average 35 bucks that he's selling it for.

Most of them would only be worth 1-2 at most.

some of them however, are worth more than the 35 bucks. I think part of the reason for the price tag is for convience and avaiblity, as a lot of games are very hard to come by, especially with the manual

Someone will buy it... *alt tabs back over to SNES Rom Emulator*

Mosesj:

Al-Bundy-da-G:
I highly doubt every game in is worth the average 35 bucks that he's selling it for.

Most of them would only be worth 1-2 at most.

some of them however, are worth more than the 35 bucks. I think part of the reason for the price tag is for convience and avaiblity, as a lot of games are very hard to come by, especially with the manual

There's also the added value of a complete set. Suppose that between the garbage games and the golden games they average $25 apeice, ALL of the games, including the garbage games and especially the golden games, will see value added for helping to complete the set. Still not quite sure if it helps make the average game worth the $35 apiece, but value is only equal to what people will pay for them, and if someone will pay the money for this set, then to them, it's worth it.

God, my inner child wants that soooooo bad. It makes me want to unpack my SNES...

For a brief moment I thought this was saying e-bay had made snes games and now I am much less confused, but yea pretty swanky if only I hadn't bought that second platinum/diamond encrusted monocle that came with a slightly smaller ruby second monoclecle

Daaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaang skippy. I still have a working Snes along with a few games. So many hours wasted playing Starfox. Twas a good game.

This is why I don't understand collectors. -_-

While this would be a dream collection for any gamer, I could never see myself paying that much for much of anything.

Just to put it in perspective, my truck was pretty nice when I got it and it cost less than half of what this guy's asking. I'm sorry but my truck is way more practical and useful than a shit-ton of SNES games, 99% of which I've never heard of or played.

Damn impressive collection though.

Also, if I had $25,000 just laying around, I STILL wouldn't be done with my student loan payments.

Al-Bundy-da-G:
I highly doubt every game in is worth the average 35 bucks that he's selling it for.

Most of them would only be worth 1-2 at most.

Earthbound and the square games alone wuld run you about 500$ probably more, so the price may not be as bad as you think, don't get me wrong no way in hell I could afford this, I'm just saying that while most of these are only worth a buck or five there are some that shoot the price up.

Wait a minute -- there were commercial North American SNES games that shipped without a box? When and which ones? I don't remember any weird packaging like that until the CD era, and I don't remember it on console games ever[1]. Or does he also have a stack of prototypes buried in there?

[1] PC games have shipped in slip covers in the past, and you see weird packaging for DVDs and audio CDs sometimes

$35 a game is a non-trivial amount, but I think it bears note that he went through all that work testing, cataloging, cleaning, and replacing batteries. That work also has some value, and it's probably worth it, to a collector at least.

I suspect anyone who's just interested in playing the games has already shuffled off to the "gray area" of emulators and ROMs, though.

If I win the lottery this week, and I mean like 20 million, I will buy it.

That's way too much money, condition isn't great and Chrono Trigger is probably the most valuable game and you can get that for $40. P.S. if anyone really is this stupid I have the best 65 of those games and I'll let them go for only $10,000 and my boxes are all in mint condition.

wow... such a shame these would not work on an australian system. To those wondering aboutthe $35 per game thing, he did clean and test all of the games and that would add value as that kind of thing is surprisingly labour intensive.

lunavixen:
wow... such a shame these would not work on an australian system. To those wondering aboutthe $35 per game thing, he did clean and test all of the games and that would add value as that kind of thing is surprisingly labour intensive.

Just a thing, that bouncing sheep is adorable. You could just buy a North American system

Evil Smurf:

Just a thing, that bouncing sheep is adorable. You could just buy a North American system

thanks, and actually i couldn't purchase a North American system, the power cord has a different shape to Australia (the wall socket) and converters are very hard to find (not to mention expensive)

lunavixen:

Evil Smurf:

Just a thing, that bouncing sheep is adorable. You could just buy a North American system

thanks, and actually I couldn't purchase a North American system, the power cord has a different shape to Australia (the wall socket) and converters are very hard to find (not to mention expensive)

I do live in Melbourne, so I know what's up with our power cables, but even so I've seen the converters in airports and ebay.

Evil Smurf:

lunavixen:

Evil Smurf:

Just a thing, that bouncing sheep is adorable. You could just buy a North American system

thanks, and actually I couldn't purchase a North American system, the power cord has a different shape to Australia (the wall socket) and converters are very hard to find (not to mention expensive)

I do live in Melbourne, so I know what's up with our power cables, but even so I've seen the converters in airports and ebay.

i haven't seen then in the airport nearest to me and i don't spend as much time on ebay as i used to but i believe you.

Beryl77:
Also, isn't that the guy who made the snes emulator bsnes? That would explain why he has such a huge collection.

Yes, it is. Being able to have and dump all the games for testing must've been quite helpful for ensuring accurate emulation.

P.S. Thanks

Evil Smurf:

lunavixen:

Evil Smurf:

Just a thing, that bouncing sheep is adorable. You could just buy a North American system

thanks, and actually I couldn't purchase a North American system, the power cord has a different shape to Australia (the wall socket) and converters are very hard to find (not to mention expensive)

I do live in Melbourne, so I know what's up with our power cables, but even so I've seen the converters in airports and ebay.

It's not just the shape, it's also the voltage.


Australia got about twice the voltage as America. here's some more details about it:

Many nations also use different plugs, and a number of plug adapter kits are available for connecting to foreign plugs. However, use of these plugs without a transformer or voltage converter can result in fireworks. The voltage in Europe is twice that of the voltage in the United States, and while many electronics are designed to adapt to voltage changes, it is crucial to check. If the device is not capable of handling 220 volts of electricity, it will fail. In addition, some electrical devices cannot handle the lower 50 hertz cycle found in much of the world, and may experience difficulties.

http://www.wisegeek.org/what-are-the-electrical-voltage-differences-between-the-us-and-europe.htm

This usually works with rechargeable items such as phones or tablets. I got an American iPad and I am able to charge it here, but not without difficulty (it charges less than it needs to run) so I wouldn't recommend buying any American product that require constant power.

 

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