Play Mario 64 on Your Ouya (When It Comes Out)

Play Mario 64 on Your Ouya (When It Comes Out)

Part of the fun the Ouya console will be the homebrew mods.

The Ouya console - backed 63,416 to the tune of nearly 8.5 million dollars - will allow you to play Android based games on your HDTV. The Ouya team is betting the open-source programming of Android will empower the gaming community to unlock the power of HD gaming from the current console manufacturer's shackles. But on top of that, creative types will be able to use the processing power of the Ouya to play a huge library of older games using emulation software - like one guy who uses the YouTube handle blackoutworm to get Mario 64 running on the Ouya devkit he received last week.

According to the Ouya Kickstarter page, the devkits were shipped out on December 28, 2012. Blackoutworm said the kits come with some tools, but he had to do some jiggery-pokery to get the Mario game from 1996 to work. Even then, there were some issues with the gameplay itself.

"As you can see at the beginning, the operating system (Android) can be a bit lagy and jerky from time to time," said blacoutworm. He also was a bit cautious in endorsing the Ouya for the regular consumer. "This is an okay console. Great for emulators and perfect as a Smart TV. But if you are a gamer, this is not a console for you unless you love to customize and upgrade things. If that's your thing, then this is the perfect toy for you."

I'm also a bit curious as to the legality of running emulators to play games without paying for them. That's piracy, as far as I can tell, especially since blackoutworm also posted videos of the Ouya playing the latest Need for Speed. Blackoutworm and those like him may not get to tinker as much as they would like without nice gentlemen with nightsticks knocking on their door. It may be cool tech to get it to work but I doubt EA would look kindly upon their big releases being played for free on an Android console. Be warned.

The retail version of the Ouya will be sent out this March to its Kickstarter backers with a possible sale to other outlets after that.

Source: YouTube via Polygon

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Is this really surprising anyone? The first thing I though when I heard "Android console" was "emulators"

major_chaos:
Is this really surprising anyone? The first thing I though when I heard "Android console" was "emulators"

He** this is the main reason I am getting one to begin with.

Emulating in of itself isn't piracy, but I am sure plenty of people will use it in a less-than-legal manner. I own most of the games that I'd want to emulate, so no moral quandary for me I suppose >.>

Fappy:
Emulating in of itself isn't piracy, but I am sure plenty of people will use it in a less-than-legal manner. I own most of the games that I'd want to emulate, so no moral quandary for me I suppose >.>

Strangely enough, a bunch of companies could make a LOT of cash by releasing their backlog of old games on such a console (Nintendo, SEGA, even a ton of PS1&2 games would run fine on the thing). But, instead of doing literally no work and making money, I suspect that they will horde their old titles like Scrooge McDuck and force people who'd be fine paying $5 or $10 to replay a classic to "steal" it.

Sidney Buit:

Fappy:
Emulating in of itself isn't piracy, but I am sure plenty of people will use it in a less-than-legal manner. I own most of the games that I'd want to emulate, so no moral quandary for me I suppose >.>

Strangely enough, a bunch of companies could make a LOT of cash by releasing their backlog of old games on such a console (Nintendo, SEGA, even a ton of PS1&2 games would run fine on the thing). But, instead of doing literally no work and making money, I suspect that they will horde their old titles like Scrooge McDuck and force people who'd be fine paying $5 or $10 to replay a classic to "steal" it.

Well some of those companies (namely Nintendo) have a large stake in how that all goes down. With the virtual console Nintendo's still making money on their old titles and they'd want people to play them on their console.

Quick note: At least according to US law, ROM images from your games are legal if you make the backups yourself from the original cartridge. Owning the game and also downloading a copy isn't technically legal.

Ethically, on the other hand, it probably should weigh on your conscience. If you own the game, you own the game... and if you have a copy of the game, it's hard to prove that isn't where you got your ROM.

P.S. Thanks

overall, i think companies favor having their "virtual titles" on their main machine as development, production, and sales of a different machine would cut minorly into their main sales and also cost more in general to chase a small market with small margins

Even if you don't own an old console game's cartridge so it's technically piracy, as long as it's not offered for sale on current-gen consoles, I don't see anything wrong with getting it.

There are hundreds of old classic games rotting away on a handful of collector cartridges, no longer sold for any modern system. You not playing them wouldn't help anyone, but you playing them might save a piece of gaming history.

One of the best things about PC classics is that ALL of them are easily accessible, even the abandonware. ESPECIALLY the abandonware.

Is anyone reminded of the OpenPandora handheld when hearing all the news about the Ouya? There are some large parallels.

Fappy:

Sidney Buit:

Fappy:
Emulating in of itself isn't piracy, but I am sure plenty of people will use it in a less-than-legal manner. I own most of the games that I'd want to emulate, so no moral quandary for me I suppose >.>

Strangely enough, a bunch of companies could make a LOT of cash by releasing their backlog of old games on such a console (Nintendo, SEGA, even a ton of PS1&2 games would run fine on the thing). But, instead of doing literally no work and making money, I suspect that they will horde their old titles like Scrooge McDuck and force people who'd be fine paying $5 or $10 to replay a classic to "steal" it.

Well some of those companies (namely Nintendo) have a large stake in how that all goes down. With the virtual console Nintendo's still making money on their old titles and they'd want people to play them on their console.

Thing is. Nintendo could easily get SNES and GBA games on the 3DS virtual Console. Will they? NOPE.

If they can get Goldeneye and Conker's Bad Fur Day running as well, then it's the new console for me. An open source system able to emulate past games from any console? Without all the damned political red tape? Yes please. Nintendo and Microsoft have shown their complete impotence to keep past games playable on current tech, so this may be the only option that might actually get the job done.

For the record, I already own both games- SM64 too.

I smell lawsuits!

On computers, Nintendo can do little to stop emulations of their games, but on a console? They will bring down the mighty Nintendo legal hammer.

Fappy:
Emulating in of itself isn't piracy, but I am sure plenty of people will use it in a less-than-legal manner. I own most of the games that I'd want to emulate, so no moral quandary for me I suppose >.>

Emulating can be very illegal. There is a right way to emulate and a wrong way. Most emulators steal BIOS dumps and those are all Illegal. The Legal way requires you to do a complete Clean Room backward engineering of the system, and that's not so easy to do. It has been done, Bleem, SNES9X, but anything that requires you to get some BIOS dump just to get it to work is the Illegal kind.

Greg Tito:

"As you can see at the beginning, the operating system (Android) can be a bit lagy and jerky from time to time," said blacoutworm. He also was a bit cautious in endorsing the Ouya for the regular consumer. "This is an okay console. Great for emulators and perfect as a Smart TV. But if you are a gamer, this is not a console for you unless you love to customize and upgrade things. If that's your thing, then this is the perfect toy for you."

Well, that killed any chance of me buying this thing if this turns out to be true.

His quote about it not being perfect for a normal gamer made me very sad. I really had high hopes for this thing. Maybe when it gets some more optimized games I'll look into it.

 

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