App Store Rejects Endgame: Syria

App Store Rejects Endgame: Syria

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Apple says the mobile game based on the Syrian civil war violates restrictions against games that "target a specific race, culture, a real government or corporation."

Endgame: Syria is a relatively simple strategy game that challenges players to "make the choices to win peace as well as war" in the ongoing Syrian civil war. You can employ everything from U.N. sanctions to declarations of support from Arab and European nations, and array military units against the far-better-equipped might of the Assad regime. Every choice has consequences, and while it's not a terribly complex simulation it does offer insight into the challenges faced by the disparate opposition forces and the Syrian people.

But don't expect to gain those insights on an Apple device, as The House That Steve Built has denied an application to release the game on the App Store. Apple apparently has rules against games that "solely target a specific race, culture, a real government or corporation, or any other real entity," and this game breaks them.

"This decision is a shame, really, as it makes it hard to talk about the real world," Endgame: Syria designer Tomas Rawlings told VentureBeat. "We had hoped that Apple would be more nuanced in how they applied this rule, but we got a bit worried when it had been in submission for around two weeks without a decision - we then figured that because of the controversy of using the gaming medium to cover an ongoing war meant passing the game had become an issue for them."

Rawlings said he understands Apple's desire to keep truly offensive material off the App Store, but there's nothing of the sort in Endgame: Syria. Developer Game the News is going to modify and resubmit the game, but that will inevitably take away some of what makes it noteworthy. "We'll have to strip some of the meaning and context from it to pass Apple's submission process and that is not ideal," Rawlings added.

The good news is that although Apple wants nothing to do with it, Android owners can snag it free from Google Play. The APK and a web-based version of the game are also available at gamethenews.net.

Source: VentureBeat

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I wonder how many World War 2 shooters are available for iOS...

This kind of thing just makes me sad. I can certainly understand the need for dedicated, proprietary storefronts to have rules about what can and can't be accepted, especially considering that Apple would inevitably take the heat if anyone decided to complain about a game. But like the man said, there needs to be nuances in how the rule is applied, and there should be times when a company is willing to stand up for the things that are on their store even if someone does complain.

Still, at least the devs have got some other options. There's always Greenlight

And yet another reason I use Android. You too can play real games about real issues. Not just what Apple thinks is ok. I am sorry Apple I thought I paid $300+ for this device I should have know that was not enough to get big brother off my back what was I thinking... QUICK TO THE GOOGLE MARKET!

Well why should the Apps store have an Endgame for Syria when no one else does?

DVS BSTrD:
Well why should the Apps store have an Endgame for Syria when no one else does?

you made me feel sad.

anyway, way to cop out apple, you may want to portray the hipster lifestyle, but you're just a mainstream wannabe and when the chips are down you're just as bland as the commercials that make fun of you say you are

"i'm a mac, and i want to be a pc but look cooler"

Mike Richards:
This kind of thing just makes me sad. I can certainly understand the need for dedicated, proprietary storefronts to have rules about what can and can't be accepted, especially considering that Apple would inevitably take the heat if anyone decided to complain about a game. But like the man said, there needs to be nuances in how the rule is applied, and there should be times when a company is willing to stand up for the things that are on their store even if someone does complain.

Still, at least the devs have got some other options. There's always Greenlight

I agree to a point - it is a shame that a game like this, which is fine, has to be passed on, but the sad truth is that people cannot be trusted to work within a system with nuance.

For every one game that tries to make a valid point, there will be a ton of games taking advantage of the nuance in the system to make something deliberately offensive, for no reason other than to offend. If Apple were to leave decisions like this to the judgement of an employee, they could find themselves in a lot of trouble with the public when a game based around shooting up a school is put up because it technically fits the rules.

rollerfox88:

Mike Richards:
This kind of thing just makes me sad. I can certainly understand the need for dedicated, proprietary storefronts to have rules about what can and can't be accepted, especially considering that Apple would inevitably take the heat if anyone decided to complain about a game. But like the man said, there needs to be nuances in how the rule is applied, and there should be times when a company is willing to stand up for the things that are on their store even if someone does complain.

Still, at least the devs have got some other options. There's always Greenlight

I agree to a point - it is a shame that a game like this, which is fine, has to be passed on, but the sad truth is that people cannot be trusted to work within a system with nuance.

For every one game that tries to make a valid point, there will be a ton of games taking advantage of the nuance in the system to make something deliberately offensive, for no reason other than to offend. If Apple were to leave decisions like this to the judgement of an employee, they could find themselves in a lot of trouble with the public when a game based around shooting up a school is put up because it technically fits the rules.

Absolutely, although having just finished Spec Ops: The Line my first thought is obviously, what happens if someone makes a game that legitimately tries to do a serious, well intentioned exploration of of a school shooting, or the psychology behind it? I've got no idea how you'd go about making it but I'm sure it's possible.

Stupid people have always been the price for free expression, always will be. I've got no solid ideas for how they could do things better, I get that I'm probably way too much of a dreaming idealist to have many practical solutions to these kind of situations. That's why I'm just kind of generally disappointed that this is the way things have to be. If there was an obvious mistake made, or a clear alternative, I'd be much angrier that things didn't go differently.

And like I said, there's still other places they can go. Free speech remains open and available, if not always applicable

irronically this is the first time there has been a game based on a war in syria. battlefront.com a few years back released combat mission shockforce which was entirely about an invasion of syria but you could also simulate civil war as well. still trips me out that it was released before all this trouble

Mike Richards:

rollerfox88:

Mike Richards:
This kind of thing just makes me sad. I can certainly understand the need for dedicated, proprietary storefronts to have rules about what can and can't be accepted, especially considering that Apple would inevitably take the heat if anyone decided to complain about a game. But like the man said, there needs to be nuances in how the rule is applied, and there should be times when a company is willing to stand up for the things that are on their store even if someone does complain.

Still, at least the devs have got some other options. There's always Greenlight

I agree to a point - it is a shame that a game like this, which is fine, has to be passed on, but the sad truth is that people cannot be trusted to work within a system with nuance.

For every one game that tries to make a valid point, there will be a ton of games taking advantage of the nuance in the system to make something deliberately offensive, for no reason other than to offend. If Apple were to leave decisions like this to the judgement of an employee, they could find themselves in a lot of trouble with the public when a game based around shooting up a school is put up because it technically fits the rules.

Absolutely, although having just finished Spec Ops: The Line my first thought is obviously, what happens if someone makes a game that legitimately tries to do a serious, well intentioned exploration of of a school shooting, or the psychology behind it? I've got no idea how you'd go about making it but I'm sure it's possible.

Stupid people have always been the price for free expression, always will be. I've got no solid ideas for how they could do things better, I get that I'm probably way too much of a dreaming idealist to have many practical solutions to these kind of situations. That's why I'm just kind of generally disappointed that this is the way things have to be. If there was an obvious mistake made, or a clear alternative, I'd be much angrier that things didn't go differently.

And like I said, there's still other places they can go. Free speech remains open and available, if not always applicable

Uh oh, looks like at least one of us is doing Internet forums wrong, cos we agree about something... That's not supposed to happen :s

I don't know how a properly mature version of those games to be made either, but I'm sure there's a way. Maybe have a mechanic where the shootout is a failure scene, and the gameplay involves living your life trying to keep a sanity bar high enough to survive, sothat the shooter is neither glorified or demonised?

rollerfox88:

Mike Richards:

rollerfox88:

I agree to a point - it is a shame that a game like this, which is fine, has to be passed on, but the sad truth is that people cannot be trusted to work within a system with nuance.

For every one game that tries to make a valid point, there will be a ton of games taking advantage of the nuance in the system to make something deliberately offensive, for no reason other than to offend. If Apple were to leave decisions like this to the judgement of an employee, they could find themselves in a lot of trouble with the public when a game based around shooting up a school is put up because it technically fits the rules.

Absolutely, although having just finished Spec Ops: The Line my first thought is obviously, what happens if someone makes a game that legitimately tries to do a serious, well intentioned exploration of of a school shooting, or the psychology behind it? I've got no idea how you'd go about making it but I'm sure it's possible.

Stupid people have always been the price for free expression, always will be. I've got no solid ideas for how they could do things better, I get that I'm probably way too much of a dreaming idealist to have many practical solutions to these kind of situations. That's why I'm just kind of generally disappointed that this is the way things have to be. If there was an obvious mistake made, or a clear alternative, I'd be much angrier that things didn't go differently.

And like I said, there's still other places they can go. Free speech remains open and available, if not always applicable

Uh oh, looks like at least one of us is doing Internet forums wrong, cos we agree about something... That's not supposed to happen :s

I don't know how a properly mature version of those games to be made either, but I'm sure there's a way. Maybe have a mechanic where the shootout is a failure scene, and the gameplay involves living your life trying to keep a sanity bar high enough to survive, sothat the shooter is neither glorified or demonised?

If anyone could pull it off. Tell Tale. Give it to them. Maybe even have Yager step in and help out.

 

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