Brian Fargo Confirms New Torment

Brian Fargo Confirms New Torment

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A successor to Planescape: Torment, set in Monte Cook's Numenera universe, is in the early stages of pre-production.

The rumor that surfaced early last December all but confirmed the existence of a new Torment game, but now it's official: In an interview with Rock, Paper, Shotgun, inXile boss Brian Fargo stated that it is in fact in the works. It won't be a straight-up sequel, however, as Wizards of the Coast was apparently uninterested in giving the studio the rights to the property. So while it will be a new Torment game, it won't be a new Planescape.

It will take place instead in Numenera, a recently Kickstarted pencil-and-paper RPG created by Monte Cook, who worked on numerous D&D products between 1992 and 2001 including several for the Planescape line. "Numenera is very exotic and rich, but is a flexible universe that empowers and support GMs," Fargo explained. "As Torment desires certain locations or features, we'll be able to do what we need to while fully respecting the setting. This goes beyond a typical licensing arrangement as Monte will be giving us direct input and even provide writing for some of the game areas."

"We're envisioning Torment as a thematic franchise with certain themes that can expand over different settings and stories," he continued, explaining how inXile intends to divide the Torment from the Planescape. "We will focus on the same things that made people appreciate PST so much: overturning RPG tropes; a fantastic, unconventional setting; memorable companions; deep thematic exploration of the human condition; heavy reactivity (i.e., choice and consequences); an intensely personal (rather than epic) story."

Also absent at this point is Chris Avellone, the lead designer of the original game and currently the creative director at Obsidian. He's not completely out of touch, however - Avellone is working with inXile on the new Wasteland - and Fargo said he's "really happy" with the team on the game, which includes Planescape veterans including Colin McComb, Adam Heine, Dana Knutson and Ray Vallese.

As for why inXile couldn't get the Planescape license, Fargo explained that Wizards of the Coast simply wasn't interested. "We asked and were rebuffed," he said. "In reality we didn't push very hard on licensing it as the team was excited to work with Monte on Numenera and they felt that there would be less creative restriction. And WotC has been pretty silent on this space for some time. Neither Feargus nor I was able to get a Baldur's Gate 3 project going."

Is a "spiritual successor" good enough? It may be great, and I hope it is, but I have to admit to a certain degree of disappointment. The Numenera setting might be fantastic, but Planescape has the advantage of being familiar, and while I have no interest in more from the Nameless One - his story is over - a trip back to the City of Doors would have been a wonderful thing.

Source: Rock, Paper, Shotgun

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Slow down, lads. There's a lot of "Is this going to suck? This better not suck." surrounding Kickstarter games in general and Wasteland 2 in particular right now. If y'all put Torment 2 up on Kickstarter in this environment, it'll suffer for it.

Definitely looking forward to this. It's something of a shame that they weren't able to license the Planescape setting; it's a fascinating world and there are far too few video games set there. Everyone just kept making Forgotten Realms games which I've always found kind of dull.

Still I'm sure that their original world will be great, too. It should afford them some more creative space, as well. I just hope the combat is better implemented this time around/removed entirely.

Awesome. Doesn't seem like it's going to be a direct sequel, which is good since Planescape: Torment had a pretty definitive end. They also worked on it and know what made it great, so... yeah. I'm excited.

Though I wish they would leave the Torment name alone, this is something to look forward to. However I am more interested in this world of Numenera. If it's interesting, and the game sells well, I am hoping it will spawn some cool stuff like books and entire tabletop RP Settings for people to play in. I am more rooting for the world Torment is going to be in than the actual game itself.

Okay, color me interested. While details are sparse, I liked the idea that Cook presented when he was kicking Numenera. Far future science fantasy civilization built upon the ruins of past futures? I'm in.

Here's some basic info and concept art for the setting/system.

The Crotch:
Slow down, lads. There's a lot of "Is this going to suck? This better not suck." surrounding Kickstarter games in general and Wasteland 2 in particular right now. If y'all put Torment 2 up on Kickstarter in this environment, it'll suffer for it.

The game has no mention of being kickstarted yet - the PnP setting was kickstarted, receiving $500,000+ when it had a goal of $20,000.

I don't think InExile is silly enough to try and have ANOTHER kickstarter when none of the "big" kickstarters have been released yet. I think InExile just has some of the designers who have downtime making Wasteland 2 working on Numenera: Torment in the mean time.

I'm no fortune-teller, but I have a feeling I'll be getting this.

Abomination:

The Crotch:
Slow down, lads. There's a lot of "Is this going to suck? This better not suck." surrounding Kickstarter games in general and Wasteland 2 in particular right now. If y'all put Torment 2 up on Kickstarter in this environment, it'll suffer for it.

The game has no mention of being kickstarted yet - the PnP setting was kickstarted, receiving $500,000+ when it had a goal of $20,000.

I don't think InExile is silly enough to try and have ANOTHER kickstarter when none of the "big" kickstarters have been released yet. I think InExile just has some of the designers who have downtime making Wasteland 2 working on Numenera: Torment in the mean time.

Actually there is a mention in the very article, linked as the source:

RPS - Are you thinking Kickstarter again?

Fargo: Absolutely. There are obvious advantages to Kickstarter for both developers and backers. We get our games funded without dealing with a crazy publisher and the backer gets a game for much less than what the finished product would cost non-backers. But beyond that, the benefit of crowd funding is that it provides feedback and accountability to the people who are actually going to play the game. It validates the concept and helps us prioritize the sensibilities of the project. We are not forced to compromise for the thought of how the "mass market" might react. It's a wonderfully pure process and one that hinges on trust.

As for whether it's a good idea or not, I won't be the judge of that. I think I'll most likely back it, if/when that happens, but how others will react, I have no idea.

OT: Very excited about it. PS:T is my second favourite game of all time, so another game in a similar vein as that is nothing short of awesome.

I'd rather have a spiritual successor to Torment than a direct sequel, and I'll admit it's cool to see that Monte Cook will have some involvement. I can't say that Numenera interests me in the slightest, unfortunately. The rules may be great, I don't know enough about them to speak to that, but the setting itself is a genre I find unappealing.

Andy Chalk:
The Numenera setting might be fantastic, but Planescape has the advantage of being familiar, and while I have no interest in more from the Nameless One - his story is over - a trip back to the City of Doors would have been a wonderful thing.

I completely agree that there need to be more games set in Planescape; given that the writers can do pretty much whatever they like with it it's a golden opportunity for creating weird and genuinely fantastical fantasy settings. On the other hand, I disagree with your statement that "Planescape has the advantage of being familiar". One of the things which made PST so great was that Planescape was so completely bizarre and unfamiliar, utterly different from any fantasy RPG before or since. In that regard, this Numenera thing, assuming it isn't just another Tolkienesque fantasy setting (disclosure: I know nothing about it), could actually be beneficial to the project if it can create that same feeling of unfamiliarity.

Plus, it guarantees that the Nameless One won't return. Frankly, it would be tantamount to sacrilege if he did.

Why even call it Torment? If the technique and execution from PST is what will be presented in this new game, then I dont see why we should have mention of Plane Scape. If its for marketing, then just weigh heavy on "the people that brought you planescape: Torment". If its not going to be the same setting the what is the point in making the connection?

Anachronism:

Andy Chalk:
The Numenera setting might be fantastic, but Planescape has the advantage of being familiar, and while I have no interest in more from the Nameless One - his story is over - a trip back to the City of Doors would have been a wonderful thing.

I completely agree that there need to be more games set in Planescape; given that the writers can do pretty much whatever they like with it it's a golden opportunity for creating weird and genuinely fantastical fantasy settings. On the other hand, I disagree with your statement that "Planescape has the advantage of being familiar". One of the things which made PST so great was that Planescape was so completely bizarre and unfamiliar, utterly different from any fantasy RPG before or since. In that regard, this Numenera thing, assuming it isn't just another Tolkienesque fantasy setting (disclosure: I know nothing about it), could actually be beneficial to the project if it can create that same feeling of unfamiliarity.

Plus, it guarantees that the Nameless One won't return. Frankly, it would be tantamount to sacrilege if he did.

I agree with you about the setting. When I was a DM, the Planescape campaign setting was the Holy Grail of boxed sets (as well as Dark Sun). So many good stories and adventures made on the fly.

Anachronism:

Andy Chalk:
The Numenera setting might be fantastic, but Planescape has the advantage of being familiar, and while I have no interest in more from the Nameless One - his story is over - a trip back to the City of Doors would have been a wonderful thing.

I completely agree that there need to be more games set in Planescape; given that the writers can do pretty much whatever they like with it it's a golden opportunity for creating weird and genuinely fantastical fantasy settings. On the other hand, I disagree with your statement that "Planescape has the advantage of being familiar". One of the things which made PST so great was that Planescape was so completely bizarre and unfamiliar, utterly different from any fantasy RPG before or since. In that regard, this Numenera thing, assuming it isn't just another Tolkienesque fantasy setting (disclosure: I know nothing about it), could actually be beneficial to the project if it can create that same feeling of unfamiliarity.

Plus, it guarantees that the Nameless One won't return. Frankly, it would be tantamount to sacrilege if he did.

As far as the setting goes, here is the overview from the tabletop game's website (linked in my post above):

Numenera is a science fantasy roleplaying game set in the far distant future. Humanity lives amid the remnants of eight great civilizations that have risen and fallen on Earth. These are the people of the Ninth World. This new world is filled with remnants of all the former worlds: bits of nanotechnology, the dataweb threaded among still-orbiting satellites, bio-engineered creatures, and myriad strange and wondrous devices. These remnants have become known as the numenera.

Player characters explore this world of mystery and danger to find these leftover artifacts of the past, not to dwell upon the old ways, but to help forge their new destinies, utilizing the so-called "magic" of the past to create a promising future.

And here's some concept art for the game:
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Andy Chalk:

Is a "spiritual successor" good enough? It may be great, and I hope it is, but I have to admit to a certain degree of disappointment. The Numenera setting might be fantastic, but Planescape has the advantage of being familiar, and while I have no interest in more from the Nameless One - his story is over - a trip back to the City of Doors would have been a wonderful thing.

yes, seeing something we are familiar with is definitely good and easy to get into.

but think more about it.

wasnt a part that made planescape good that it had an atmosphere and setting we werent familiar with?

A few things:

1. I am super excited for it, even though I haven't actually finished Planescape: Torment. Another game with those same design philosophies would be amazing.

2. I think the fact that they're using a different setting is a good thing, as part of the what made the original Torment so appealing was the fact that you were in this totally unfamiliar and alien place, which would be hard to replicate if they were going back to Planescape. Plus, what (admittedly little) I've heard about this new setting sounds awesome.

3. I think that, if (or more likely when) they Kickstart it, they will probably do it after Wasteland 2 is out. There are several reasons for this. For one, they probably won't start full production on this game until after Wasteland 2 is done, so a Kickstarter before then is a little pointless. But I think a bigger reason is if Wasteland 2 is good, people would be much more likely to back an RPG from the same developer.

4.

Andy Chalk:
A success to Planescape: Torment

I think you meant successor, not success. Sorry, but reading this just bugged me.

rhizhim:

Andy Chalk:

Is a "spiritual successor" good enough? It may be great, and I hope it is, but I have to admit to a certain degree of disappointment. The Numenera setting might be fantastic, but Planescape has the advantage of being familiar, and while I have no interest in more from the Nameless One - his story is over - a trip back to the City of Doors would have been a wonderful thing.

yes, seeing something we are familiar with is definitely good and easy to get into.

but think more about it.

wasnt a part that made planescape good that it had an atmosphere and setting we werent familiar with?

I don't know if it's just me, and believe me I can't say I dislike the concept art, but doesn't it all look like stuff we've seen before? I thought they ripped the iceberg picture from Hoth, and the floating pillar looks exactly like it did in Halo 4 :(. The water one and the characters look unique enough though.

Javarino:

rhizhim:

Andy Chalk:

Is a "spiritual successor" good enough? It may be great, and I hope it is, but I have to admit to a certain degree of disappointment. The Numenera setting might be fantastic, but Planescape has the advantage of being familiar, and while I have no interest in more from the Nameless One - his story is over - a trip back to the City of Doors would have been a wonderful thing.

yes, seeing something we are familiar with is definitely good and easy to get into.

but think more about it.

wasnt a part that made planescape good that it had an atmosphere and setting we werent familiar with?

I don't know if it's just me, and believe me I can't say I dislike the concept art, but doesn't it all look like stuff we've seen before? I thought they ripped the iceberg picture from Hoth, and the floating pillar looks exactly like it did in Halo 4 :(. The water one and the characters look unique enough though.

The ice pic looks more Game of Thrones than Star Wars to me, but really, what sort of originality do you expect from a picture of ice? Our own ice age predated ESB by a few years or so when you get down to it.

As for the pillar... Halo 4 came out November 6th. Numenera's Kickstarter ended September 17th. I'm not really sure I'd call that a ripoff.

What is with WotC, why are they so apathetic? I mean Planescape is discontinued, sure that might have been a factor, but I'm pretty sure Forgotten Realms isn't. If it is I guess I dreamed all those setting changes, and I can't decide if thats good or bad.
Anyway, seems odd to not let the property be used.

The Crotch:
Slow down, lads. There's a lot of "Is this going to suck? This better not suck." surrounding Kickstarter games in general and Wasteland 2 in particular right now. If y'all put Torment 2 up on Kickstarter in this environment, it'll suffer for it.

Peoples perception of the game might, but not the game itself.

As long as they can secure the services of Avellone this has a chance. Torment is just marketing/fundraising bait as far as I can tell. I too would like another Planescape game...as long as it was Advanced Dungeons and Dragons that is...THAC0 for life!

The setting was great, and though it would've been fun to revisit Planescape, the things that are better remembered of Torment were the characters and story. It stands today still as a masterpiece that many modern games can't compete with, in their quests instead to just pump out aged UE3 engine graphics.

Deeper, personal story > shorter, better looking epic.

kind of a misleading title isn't it? i mean its not a new torment but a spiritual successor (i cant believe i spelt that correctly).

on topic, i hope they will finish wasteland 2 first before starting this one, would hate to have wasteland be rushed just to have them then rush this game.

What I'd like to know is why is WotC clinging to the Planescape license to such an extent? It's not like there's been any official material since 2nd ed (IIRC, for quite a while at the very least) and I don't think there are any known plans to do anything with it. So why not let the man do another Planescape game?

Scars Unseen:
As far as the setting goes, here is the overview from the tabletop game's website (linked in my post above):

Numenera is a science fantasy roleplaying game set in the far distant future. Humanity lives amid the remnants of eight great civilizations that have risen and fallen on Earth. These are the people of the Ninth World. This new world is filled with remnants of all the former worlds: bits of nanotechnology, the dataweb threaded among still-orbiting satellites, bio-engineered creatures, and myriad strange and wondrous devices. These remnants have become known as the numenera.

Player characters explore this world of mystery and danger to find these leftover artifacts of the past, not to dwell upon the old ways, but to help forge their new destinies, utilizing the so-called "magic" of the past to create a promising future.

Sir, you had my curiosity. But now you have my attention. That sounds like a great setting to use for this sort of game, and I'd really like to see more sci-fi RPGs that aren't Mass Effect. Plus, the fact that it's completely new is only going to add to the feeling of unfamiliarity.

I shall be watching this with interest.

I'm dead keen for this, even without the familiar aspects of Planescape. I still play the original once a year religously.

Jandau:
What I'd like to know is why is WotC clinging to the Planescape license to such an extent? It's not like there's been any official material since 2nd ed (IIRC, for quite a while at the very least) and I don't think there are any known plans to do anything with it. So why not let the man do another Planescape game?

Well said, I couldnt agree more. I dont care for spiritual successors, if there is to be another Torment... I want to play it in Planescape.

I'm pretty sure that -aside from the possibility that WotC just doesn't want dead settings being licensed- the primary reason that they would turn down a pitch for a D&D game right now is that they are in the middle of an edition transition. 4E is dead as far as publishing goes, but 5E (or "Next" as they are currently calling it) is still in public playtesting. As games take at least a couple of years to make, licensing a new game based on 4E now would be a bad move, so likely you won't see any new D&D games being announced until the playtest has run its course and the rules for the new edition have been finalized.

At least Atari doesn't have a stranglehold on D&D gaming rights like they did throughout 4E.

Knight Templar:
What is with WotC, why are they so apathetic? I mean Planescape is discontinued, sure that might have been a factor, but I'm pretty sure Forgotten Realms isn't. If it is I guess I dreamed all those setting changes, and I can't decide if thats good or bad.
Anyway, seems odd to not let the property be used.

The Crotch:
Slow down, lads. There's a lot of "Is this going to suck? This better not suck." surrounding Kickstarter games in general and Wasteland 2 in particular right now. If y'all put Torment 2 up on Kickstarter in this environment, it'll suffer for it.

Peoples perception of the game might, but not the game itself.

If the developers are relying on people for funding, then yes, the game itself will suffer.

The Crotch:
If the developers are relying on people for funding, then yes, the game itself will suffer.

How so? They have to get the funding from somewhere, and if they got it from a publisher they'd probably demand a multiplayer component be put in, or make it first person to appeal to the COD crowd.

Genocidicles:

The Crotch:
If the developers are relying on people for funding, then yes, the game itself will suffer.

How so? They have to get the funding from somewhere, and if they got it from a publisher they'd probably demand a multiplayer component be put in, or make it first person to appeal to the COD crowd.

The answer to your post is literally the first reply to this thread...

The Crotch:
Slow down, lads. There's a lot of "Is this going to suck? This better not suck." surrounding Kickstarter games in general and Wasteland 2 in particular right now. If y'all put Torment 2 up on Kickstarter in this environment, it'll suffer for it.

I really don't know how to make it much clearer than that. With all the Torment talk lately, it seems like they're gearing up for the Kickstarter campaign. A lot of people don't want that Kickstarter campaign to happen right now because none of the big Kickstarter games have come out and we don't know how Wasteland 2 is going to go. So with all the uncertainty right now, a lot of people will be hesitant to give them money. That will hurt the game.

The Crotch:

Genocidicles:

The Crotch:
If the developers are relying on people for funding, then yes, the game itself will suffer.

How so? They have to get the funding from somewhere, and if they got it from a publisher they'd probably demand a multiplayer component be put in, or make it first person to appeal to the COD crowd.

The answer to your post is literally the first reply to this thread...

The Crotch:
Slow down, lads. There's a lot of "Is this going to suck? This better not suck." surrounding Kickstarter games in general and Wasteland 2 in particular right now. If y'all put Torment 2 up on Kickstarter in this environment, it'll suffer for it.

I really don't know how to make it much clearer than that. With all the Torment talk lately, it seems like they're gearing up for the Kickstarter campaign. A lot of people don't want that Kickstarter campaign to happen right now because none of the big Kickstarter games have come out and we don't know how Wasteland 2 is going to go. So with all the uncertainty right now, a lot of people will be hesitant to give them money. That will hurt the game.

I was going to ask the same question, but this isn't an answer.

If the game doesn't get funded, which I would count as unlikely then them game won't exist, sure. But that is the same situation the game would be in without Kickstarter, and thus Kickstarter isn't harming the game. There was just as much uncertainty for Project Eternity and that got more than funded.

The problem must be me, here. Let me try again.

They are going to use Kickstarter. Given all the Torment talk lately, it seems like they're gearing up to start the campaign soon, which would be poor timing on their part. Even though the game would undoubtedly hit its funding goal, the current climate of uncertainty (and don't think for a second that PE compares: Obsidian made New Vegas and The Sith Lords. InXile made Hunted: The Demon's Forge, a game that I only know exists because of Unskippable) would work against them. There are a lot of multi-million-dollar Kickstarted RPGs in the works, and the thought of inXile starting up a second one before any of them is out, let alone theirs, is scary to a lot of people. While they would doubtless hit their funding goal, the amount of money they would take in would be far less than if they were able to wait until at least one of the Big Projects was out and successful; preferably theirs.

I never said "Kickstarter will hurt the game". I said, once again: "If y'all put Torment 2 up on Kickstarter in this environment, it'll suffer for it."

I really didn't think "woah, I hope they hold off on this Kickstarter because people will be more inclined to give money - and give more money - later" would be that damn hard a thing to communicate.

EDIT: I guess there might be some confusion over my saying "If the developers are relying on people for funding, then yes, the game itself will suffer."? That was specifically in response to your stating that people's perception of the game will have no bearing on its final quality. When those people are responsible for funding it, their perception is vital.

The Crotch:
While they would doubtless hit their funding goal, the amount of money they would take in would be far less than if they were able to wait until at least one of the Big Projects was out and successful; preferably theirs.

So by "suffer" you mean to say they might not get as much extra, unnecessary funding?

Yes, of course. A $1.1 million game is a lot different than a $4.25 million game.

 

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