Ouya CEO Plans To Release New Console Every Year

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Ouya CEO Plans To Release New Console Every Year

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The first Ouya isn't even in our hands yet, and the company is already talking about number three.

It may seem like we've been hearing about the Ouya forever, but if you're already tired of reading about the tiny, Android-powered box, just wait until next year... and the year after. According to Ouya CEO Julie Uhrman, the company plans to release a new Ouya every single year. Yes, you read that correctly.

"Our strategy is very much similar to the mobile strategy," explained Uhrman. "There will be a new Ouya every year. There will be an Ouya 2 and an Ouya 3." We're not sure what the company's fourth console will be called... but we could probably make an educated guess.

Given that the Ouya is little more than gussied-up Android smartphone hardware, it makes a good bit of sense that the system will become antiquated along the same lines as your typical handset. Whether the company's strategy will resonate with consumers - and on the verge of a new home console generation, no less - will be interesting to see.

Source: Engadget

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I like how they are already committing resources without any feedback at all.

...I thought that this was an Android device, not an Apple.

WWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhat?!!!

My "This is a horrendous Idea" Alarm is going off like mad!! Not only was I worried consoles like the Ouya, GameStick and the SHIELD would cause a new Video Game Crash, but now these people feel the need to release a console EVERY YEAR?!!!

I can't be the only one thinking this is a terrible idea! And an incredibly greedy one! This is like Quaker Oats making video games... Which they did in the early 80's!

Ouya Company, you've lost my support completely!

Because nothing builds confidence more than telling people who haven't even bought the thing yet that their purchase will be obsolete in a year.

They want us to buy a new console every year for about a hundred bucks? Fuck that, I'd go out and buy the other new consoles instead, as the generations tend to last 5+ years, and the cost of a console will be less than $500 (I hope). I wanted an Ouya, but if they plan to charge that much money for someone that's outdated in a year, no way.

Well that is one way to kill off interest in your product.

I understand they need to release new versions from time to time, but I think this might be too often. That said, you don't NEED to buy the latest one every time it comes out. Presumably, games will continue to come out that still run on older generations of the device, assuming the new ones are the same only more powerful. I don't expect any major changes to the platform like you see between console generations. If I have to spend $100 every three years to keep up, that's really not all that bad.

P.S. Thanks

You have the Activision business plan backwards.

Well that means that they could have an Assassins Creed game as a launch title for every new system they make!

Oh and fuck that, makes it by far the most expensive way to game, you can keep a PC near the high end for 100 a year if you sell off last years parts _

Yay, annual obsolescence!

I doubt we'll ever see an Ouya 3, then.

They're simply not going to sell in nearly the same numbers as the phones, so the economies of scale don't play out well for them.. especially if they're having to retool every single year.

Then again, who knows, maybe they'll just run a kickstarter every year and let gullible rubes fund their business plan.

This...is actually not so bad, in theory. I mean, what exactly are we expecting from them? If, like in the cellphone, every year they are adding stuff up on top of other stuff I could see the system ending up quite elaborate by the time the next generation of home systems is in its last legs. Though, that being the case, I don't why they shouldn't instead sell Ouya parts instead of full systems every year.

Barring, of course, a complete failure of the product from the beginning.

Releasing a new console every year.....guess they are using the apple business model. lol. From what i saw on wiki it has FF3 being released on it and maybe a SNES/N64 emulator and a load of other pointless shovel ware sounding games.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Ouya_software

Gearhead mk2:
...I thought that this was an Android device, not an Apple.

At least it is still going to be much cheaper than any apple device. However the only apple product I own, my iPod Touch (whatever gen) I've had for over 3 years so they really shouldn't expect me to buy an Ouya every year.

They sure as shit better keep up support for there product for several years and offer the same interface on each system as well as backwards support, otherwise they aren't going to survive that second console (assuming they make it that far).

Glad to see I'm not the only one pissed off by this.

I said this on Destructoid, but this announcement is pure idiocy. No other word to describe it.

The one thing consoles have over PCs, the one thing they can use to appeal to gamers and developers, is the fact that they use standardised hardware. Games don't have to be developed to run on a thousand different configurations, and gamers don't have to buy multiple upgrade parts just to stay up-to-date.

This whole idea goes against the very idea of consoles. You're fracturing your own market by replacing your own console so regularly. Phones get away with it because phones are something of a necessary item in modern life. If you have a house, a job and a social life, then you need a phone. Simple as. Phone developers are able to use this necessity to constantly develop and upgrade new models to sell to people looking for a replacment or upgrade.

Consoles are a luxury, however, not a necessity. People will not buy a console if it's going to be replaced within a year. People buy consoles for the standardised hardware, and the ease of use.

What really annoys me here is the level of smugness on display. These guys haven't even managed to get their first bit of hardware out the door yet, and they're already talking about annual new models? Sorry, which large scale manufacturing corporation funded the Ouya? Oh, that's right, they didn't. You had to use Kickstarter just to get the funds for the first Ouya. Where exactly are the funds for Ouya 2 and 3 going to come from if the first one doesn't sell as well as you initially hoped?

Such a dick, dick move. The thing is, because they'll be selling Ouya's for $99, it doesn't matter how much they upgrade it, they're always going to be behind the curve. People are moaning about the Wii U not being the leap they hoped for, but at least it can still run stuff like this. Upgraded Ouyas are still going to be behind the curve, and doing nothing but fracturing and splintering the very market its trying to win over. I just don't see the point. Make a good console, stick with it. It's been the golden rule of selling consoles ever since the industry recovered from the crash of 83.

SonOfVoorhees:
Releasing a new console every year.....guess they are using the apple business model. lol. From what i saw on wiki it has FF3 being released on it and maybe a SNES/N64 emulator and a load of other pointless shovel ware sounding games.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Ouya_software

The emulators alone are worth the price of admission. It is a massive selling point for people interested in all kinds of old software, for whatever reason, not just restricted to console emulators.

Gearhead mk2:
...I thought that this was an Android device, not an Apple.

Because Android manufacturers don't put out new phones and tablets each year?

While this seems like a bad idea from a console standpoint, it might actually work out pretty well for them if they can retain backwards compatibility(no reason why they can't if they keep it Android) and keep the price down. The Ouya is going to be pretty low key compared to other consoles, but after a couple of iterations we could have something that rivals or even surpasses the glacial advancement of mainstream console technology.

Frankly, if they charge $100 for every version they put out (and of course assuming they can keep developers making games for the line of devices), this could be the start of something big.

Or it could flop. Not everyone can be a winner in the console wars.

I think my initial reaction to this was an over reaction.

The smart phones can continue to work just fine for 3-4 years before an upgrade is needed. If they are going to continue to refine year by year they are not forcing people to upgrade yearly, just refining the product. Buying a new one for $100 or so every 4 years is not so bad.

The only harm I can think of for the console is that I (and others like me) might wait for the second gen version so they get all the kinks worked out, and that might lead to a drop in first year sales that hurt the start up.

Scars Unseen:

Gearhead mk2:
...I thought that this was an Android device, not an Apple.

Because Android manufacturers don't put out new phones and tablets each year?

While this seems like a bad idea from a console standpoint, it might actually work out pretty well for them if they can retain backwards compatibility(no reason why they can't if they keep it Android) and keep the price down. The Ouya is going to be pretty low key compared to other consoles, but after a couple of iterations we could have something that rivals or even surpasses the glacial advancement of mainstream console technology.

Frankly, if they charge $100 for every version they put out (and of course assuming they can keep developers making games for the line of devices), this could be the start of something big.

Or it could flop. Not everyone can be a winner in the console wars.

Exactly. In the end it all comes down to price. If it makes some kind of sense then people will buy it -- some are forgetting that the whole point of the console is to make it hackeable in terms of hardware, also, so they may as well sell freaking update modules to the thing, or maybe third parties can jump in on it, or build your own custom Ouya, or something.

It could all go south, but so far they are doing something distinct enough from the current model that warrants looking into.

They won't make it to 3. The second one will do poorly and just like consoles, the devs design to the lowest common denominator so that more people buy it. So we will see 95% of the games made for OUYA even when OUYA 3 would be ready to launch. I don't think the OUYA people understand this market very well.

....So if I want to keep ouya updated I have to pay you...at least a hundred dollars a year?...I mean how does this work, I just trade in my last ouya maybe? Well then what the hell was the point of getting the first ouya? And does that mean that all the games I had on my last ouya will now be lost cause I went out and bought a new ouya? I mean this...I don't understand how this business model works...

I mean I don't have a hundred dollars every year to drop on a new console.

I...yeah the more I hear about the ouya the less I get excited. I mean there are some really great indie games out there...but the majority of them are shit, so why would I spend money on this console that, haven't not even been released, already seems like it's trying to steal my wallet? Especially since if I just wait, just about any good indie game I might really I can probably get elsewhere or get super cheap off of a humble indie bundle?

I'm not saying Ouya doesn't have any reason to exist and there may come some really neat stuff from it...but...I'm not really feeling it.

>Before Article "Gee, this is going to be an inexpensive and enjoyable experience

>After Article "Welp! Time to wait for the various Steam Boxes to come out!"

I imagine that the "versioning" going on with the Ouya will be iterative improvements to hardware, as you can get better chips & graphics cards for N dollars as time goes by.

Kindof like how the PS3 have had several versions (original, slim, super-slim), with changes to form factor, some hardware tweaks, etc. I don't think they keep changing the APIs, so that everyone needs to go out and upgrade every year.

Or like Apple with iPhone/iPad/iOS. They come out with new versions annually, but you can still run everything on devices that are a few generations old. I have an iPhone 4, and it runs all my apps just fine, even though the 4S and 5 have come out in the meantime.

It could be that they're doing the Nintendo DS thing; first one comes out, then one that's smaller with some extra feature, then one that's smaller/longer battery life, etc. You know, bells and whistles. Silly, but not really a bad practice. Waste of money for anyone who already has an Ouya, but may motivate new customers to buy one.

If Ouya 1 and Ouya 2 are significantly different from one another as say, Xbox and Xbox360 (as in, an actual new system), they're sunk. That'll never work. Cell phones work because cellphones and touch pads are hot topic. They are the Abercrombie and Fitch of technology. People buy them yearly because they're hip and fashionable, not for any real benefit

Also, there would have to be reverse compatibility. Otherwise, game companies could not make games with development longer than a few months. After all, why make a game, when the system you're making it for is going to be obsolete? I think PS2 and Game Boy Advanced are really the only systems that ever got a few years of good development after the next systems (PS3 and DS) had come out. In other words, it generally doesn't work.

First and foremost though, they have to make Ouya, and make it suceed. I don't care if they plan up to Ouya 26, until we get an actual game system in our hands, its kind of a moot point.

Scars Unseen:

Gearhead mk2:
...I thought that this was an Android device, not an Apple.

Because Android manufacturers don't put out new phones and tablets each year?

While this seems like a bad idea from a console standpoint, it might actually work out pretty well for them if they can retain backwards compatibility(no reason why they can't if they keep it Android) and keep the price down. The Ouya is going to be pretty low key compared to other consoles, but after a couple of iterations we could have something that rivals or even surpasses the glacial advancement of mainstream console technology.

Not at $99 a pop you're not. The Ouya coming out this year is using a Tegra-3, which has already been replaced by the Tegra-4. If they want to keep the price low, they're not going to be able to upgrade beyond a Tegra-4 for a while. If they do incremental upgrades, then by the time they'll have reached Durango/Orbis' rumoured specs, Microsoft and Sony will already be on the generation beyond the next one.

Gaming tech is expensive. You're not going to make the Big Three redundant by re-releasing a $99 console each year. Even the Wii U, by far the least powerful of the three 'next gen' consoles, is leaps and bounds ahead of the Ouya. If they want to match the hardware used by MicroSontendo, they're not going to do it by using the latest cut-price mobile GPU.

And again, phones are a completely different market. People need phones, and are therefore more willing to upgrade and replace them. People don't need consoles. If they wanted a gaming machine they could upgrade every year, they'd already be PC gamers.

The only logical reason I can see them doing a yearly release is if their business model is 100% reliant on the selling of their console. Meaning that when it comes to their "marketplace" of android games that they are getting ZERO PERCENT from the games being bought there. That just screams "bad business model".

That is probably one of the oddities of being in the video game industry and we have seen this before, you can't JUST be a hardware seller when it comes to consoles. You need a development department that creates software because once a consumer has bought the hardware short of said hardware breaking or being outdated then you don't need to buy another.

Personally I'm not interested in supporting the Ouya because I already use my TV as my Desktop PC and I already have a smart phone that does what I need it to do and have never been interested in the games there either.

Lol, of course they have to upgrade, its already oldish HW, mobile processors are moving leaps and bounds every year. Ouya will try to be a steam like client for android iOS type games. Kind of defeats the purpose of a cheap console when its likely that one could only really afford to skip one iteration before completely loosing new software support. In fact I would rather see ouya become some sort of standardized android gaming platform/software suite and let us use out own hardware. That way your not contributing to the fragmentation of cheap consoles based on android.

j-e-f-f-e-r-s:

And again, phones are a completely different market. People need phones, and are therefore more willing to upgrade and replace them. People don't need consoles. If they wanted a gaming machine they could upgrade every year, they'd already be PC gamers.

Bullshit. People do not need a new phone ever year, or even every other year. People don't need smart phones at all(except possibly in a few careers that have adapted the tech into the way they do business). People get them because they want them. I've had the same phone for the last 5 years, and it still makes phone calls. The only reason I switched 5 years ago is because I got married, and switching carriers allowed me to make free phone calls to my wife.

The people that buy new smart phones every year do so for one of two reasons: the phone's perception as a status symbol, and because they wanted to use apps that run better on newer hardware(often games). No one buys a new phone every year because the new one makes phone calls so much better(unless they switch carriers).

You are all being dramatic and silly. You are talking about a hardware that is structured on mobile technology, which is still iterating insanely fast. You can't think of the Ouya as a traditional console because it's not. It bridges the space between mobile and console. I can guarantee:

You WILL see:
-Increased hardware year-over-year to keep on par with current mobile processing capabilities and abilities
-New form factors / colors to denote year over year iterations
-Games that can be played across all generations of hte platform (assuming processing power is sufficient and everything)

You WONT see:
-A new UI every release, designed only for that iteration of the platform
-Games that can only be played on a certain piece of hardware
-The requirement to update your system with every iterative release
-Games tied to a specific piece of hardware (Ouya 1, 2, or 3)

When you think how quickly everything changes in the mobile space, to keep developers interested, they have to keep up SOMEWHAT on the mobile market. Iterating every year isn't going to keep them on the bleeding edge of mobile technologies, but just about smack in the middle of the processor life cycle.

Ouya is a platform, built on Android. Think about how android runs OS releases -- it'll be the same with Ouya because it has to be the same because the core technology is the same. The games available on Ouya will still be able to played on future generations (provide any major tweaks to the platform - and the game development stopping).

TL;DR - this is the only thing they can do stay current in the market, and continue to attract developers to the platform. New Ouya models will be more akin to iterative cell phone technology that current console iteration.

Scars Unseen:

Bullshit. People do not need a new phone ever year, or even every other year. People don't need smart phones at all(except possibly in a few careers that have adapted the tech into the way they do business). People get them because they want them. I've had the same phone for the last 5 years, and it still makes phone calls. The only reason I switched 5 years ago is because I got married, and switching carriers allowed me to make free phone calls to my wife.

The people that buy new smart phones every year do so for one of two reasons: the phone's perception as a status symbol, and because they wanted to use apps that run better on newer hardware(often games). No one buys a new phone every year because the new one makes phone calls so much better(unless they switch carriers).

Yeah, here's the thing: Companies like Samsung and Apple release yearly updates of their phone. That doesn't mean they're targeting yearly adopters.

The phone market is a larger demographic than console gaming could ever reach. Everyone has a phone. That means that there are millions of people every year who, whether because their previous phone has gotten old, unreliable or just plain broken, decide to upgrade. I used to have an old-style Samsung phone complete with proper keys, which served me wel enough. Then, last year, the battery decided to fuck itself. Rather than trying to score a replacement battery for a discontinued phone, I decided to make the leap and buy a new Smartphone. Ended up buying a Samsung Galaxy Note, which had been out for all of 8 or 9 months I believe.

There are millions of customers like me, customers who want to replace an old or broken phone. There are millions more customers who, every month of every year, come to the end of their mobile contracts and decide to upgrade to something else. That is why companies like Apple and Samsung do annual model updates. Because every single year, without fail, there are millions of new customers looking to buy replace their old phone or old contract, and the best way to win them over to your model of phone is make it as sleek looking and up-to-date as possible.

People who buy smartphones every year are a very, very small part of the tech market.

And the reason people buy smartphones in droves is because technology marches on. I would be hard-pressed to find an old style Nokia at any phone shop on the high street, and frankly I have no need of one. It lacks the basic functionality and multi-tasking capability of smartphones, and has been thoroughly topples in the West as the example of what a phone should be.

Consoles cannot compare to that. People don't go through consoles on a contract like they do phones. People don't use consoles to organise their social lives, stay in touch with family members, and organise business meetings. If I can't go into work because I'm feeling ill, I use my mobile to let them know, not my Xbox. That is what phones have over consoles, and that is why it is useless to think that the console market can in any way operate like the phone one. PCs have already got the annual upgrade section of the gaming industry down. If Ouya want to go into annual upgrades of hardware, their competition are going to be the likes of AMD and Nvidia, not Samsung or Apple. And they're going to get steamed, because they're only ever going to be able to use tech that costs under $99.

If you waited 5 or 6 years, you still wouldn't be able to buy, put together and sell the tech in the next gen consoles for under $99. Tech goes down in price, but not by that much. The best thing Ouya can do is release a strong consle, then try and support it as much as they can, not throw out upgrades which achieve jack shit when their total budget still doesn't even break the $100 mark.

Serrenitei:
You are all being dramatic and silly. You are talking about a hardware that is structured on mobile technology, which is still iterating insanely fast. You can't think of the Ouya as a traditional console because it's not. It bridges the space between mobile and console.

No it doesn't. Phones aren't defined by their Android functionality, but by their ability to allow you to connect and communicate with anyone on the planet, no matter whether you're at home, on the bus, in the library, at work or at a restaurant. That is, and always will be, a phone's primary function, and its a function the Ouya isn't even close to approximating.

It's a budget console using mobile parts to cut costs. That's it. It has a controller, it playes videogames, it doesn't make video calls. Console, not phone.

as long as the software/peripherals are backwards compatible and transferable i don't have a problem.

software developers will make their own choice about where they want to position their product based on the install base at any given time. if game streaming ever takes off the power of the actually item becomes largely irrelevant compared to it's ability to perform the function.

PS. imho it won't be long before someone else puts the same basic idea inside the TV itself...

j-e-f-f-e-r-s:

No it doesn't. Phones aren't defined by their Android functionality, but by their ability to allow you to connect and communicate with anyone on the planet, no matter whether you're at home, on the bus, in the library, at work or at a restaurant. That is, and always will be, a phone's primary function, and its a function the Ouya isn't even close to approximating.

It's a budget console using mobile parts to cut costs. That's it. It has a controller, it playes videogames, it doesn't make video calls. Console, not phone.

Ok let's try this again where you actually read what I wrote. I never said the Ouya console was a phone, I said that it bridges the gap between mobile and console. In fact, I never even used the word phone in that paragraph. What I'm saying is that you the console hardware iteration will develop like phone hardware. If that's too far of a concept, try thinking of it as iterating on a computer.

Sure, better computers are coming out all the time because people buy them, all the time. Not the same people buy a new computer ever 3 months, but there are new models releasing every 3 months to account for changes in technology. The Ouya will be the same thing - the hardware that supports the Ouya platform will continue to get better and better. How many developers still develop for a PC only capable of running windows 95?

Iterating every 6 years on the current console life cycle would kill Ouya. The developers adjust to changing technology much faster, and leave older, slower technology behind. A quick, open iterative process is what Ouya has to have to survive. Does that mean that when Ouya 2 comes out that your Ouya 1 will suddenly stop playing games? Or that No one will create games for it anymore? No, that would be stupid. By the time you hit 2 years out, the Ouya 3 you will begin to find games that can't play on the Ouya 1's hardware, and you'll have to upgrade.

Kinda like, ya know, it were a computer, or a phone that requires frequent updating to stay on top of the times. You CANNOT think of this machine in the current console life cycle. It does not work.

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