Smartphones and Tablets Will Outnumber Humanity in 2013

Smartphones and Tablets Will Outnumber Humanity in 2013

image

American multinational Cisco Systems thinks smartphones and tablets are taking over the internet.

Cisco Systems' latest forecast has internet-connected mobile devices - smartphones and tablets, mainly - outnumbering the population of the planet in 2013. Moreover, smartphones will dominate the field; in 2013, handsets will account for 50% of the world's mobile data traffic.

2012 was the year things really took off, as global mobile data traffic increased by 70%. That same year was the first time mobile video traffic exceeded 50% of the total usage; so, all those cute cat videos you've been forwarding? You're kinda hogging the bandwidth there, fella.

But if 2012 was anything, it was the year of the smartphone. Those little devils only accounted for 18% of total handsets in use, but represented a whopping 92% of total global internet handset traffic. Mind you, it didn't all go Apple's way, as 2012 was also the year that Android overtook the iPhone in terms of level of data use, in the United States and Western Europe.

Meanwhile, tablets were kicking into high gear. In 2012 the number of mobile-connected tablets exploded to 36 million, 2.5 times more devices than existed before. Moreover each of those tablets generated 2.4 times more internet traffic than the average smartphone.

Wondering where most of that traffic is going? Well, the Middle East and Africa are the biggest new users, and are predicted to achieve 77% annual growth rate year-on-year. Asia Pacific (76%) and Latin America (67%) are next in line. Asia Pacific and North America are expected to be the two major players, and account for about two thirds of mobile data traffic, by 2017.

For those interested in knowing what Cisco thinks the future will hold, in the next five years it predicts that:

Monthly global mobile data traffic will surpass 10 exabytes in 2017.
The number of mobile-connected devices will exceed the world's population in 2013.
The average mobile connection speed will surpass 1 Mbps in 2014.
Due to increased usage on smartphones, handsets will exceed 50 percent of mobile data traffic in 2013.
Monthly mobile tablet traffic will surpass 1 exabyte per month in 2017.
Tablets will exceed 10 percent of global mobile data traffic in 2015.

Source: Cisco

Permalink

I thought they did already. Well I guess I haven't doing my part: I'm still a Mobile Virgin.

Huh, another tech hyperbole.

If anything I will take this statement/article as another sign that most people consider a mobile phone/tablet more important than food on the table.

The number of mobile-connected devices will exceed the world's population in 2013.

Is that number of active devices? Because if that's just "more exist than humans" then it's hardly a surprise. Apple devotees tend to buy a new model every few months.

i expect connection speeds to shrink or prices to go through the roof soon. theres only so much wireless bandwidth they can use and smart phones use alot. so much so that we are nearing the limit

wombat_of_war:
i expect connection speeds to shrink or prices to go through the roof soon. theres only so much wireless bandwidth they can use and smart phones use alot. so much so that we are nearing the limit

You do know that in most countries where the internet is not distributed by monopolistic cable/phone/internet companies, they have more users, with higher connection speeds, for lower costs, don't you?

As long as there are paying customers, the global framework for internet access can be expanded indefinitely. We'll overcrowd the Earth before they'll run out of ways to give us data.

However, if you want people to continue paying for cable when they can get all of their content and more on the internet, maybe you throttle their connection or put a cap and start pointing at "bandwith hogs" and "limited framework" as an excuse. Do a bit of research on the global internet situation and prepare for a bit of a shock. In America we pay 2-3x as much for a service that is often times 100x slower than in countries that are even more overcrowded with people who all consume a lot of data.

 

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Register for a free account here