Rage Gives You the Power

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Rage Gives You the Power

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id Software opens up Rage with a huge 35GB mod kit.

While Rage might have been met with mixed reviews, its technology was universally praised. id Software managed to create a game that years later is still one of the best looking games out there, and runs smoothly on both consoles and PCs (well, after a few good patches). If you've been gnawing your arm off with ideas on how to improve Rage, id's giving you a shot. Today, they've released a massive 35GB dev kit that unpacks the game and lets you put it back together your way, assuming you've got the chops.

The core of this new release is idStudio, the "internal tech used to create RAGE". To help you out with these tools, id has graciously included tutorials and actual in-game levels for you to pull apart. To help you with your modding, all of the original art assets are included. Every model, texture, and animation is yours to command, or to dance about.

While the recent release of more DLC was unexpected, this was not. id has a history of releasing mod tools for recent games, and opening the source code for their older engines.

I'm sure that you creative types out there have spiral-bound notebooks brimming with ideas, but some others might need some extra help. Let me help you out with some freebies: hang gliders, arc wielders, and a real multiplayer mode. Now GO! There's a lot of power in the id Tech5 engine, lets see what it can do!

Keep in mind that this kit isn't exactly WYSIWYG. As the FAQ states, "this download is provided on an 'as is' basis only for the technically sophisticated and adventurous!"

Source: Bethesda Blog

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OK, so this is actually quite awesome. As much as a meh I gave that game it really looked vibrant and I loved the feeling of the guns and how the enemies reacted to a well placed shot. If the modding community around Rage grows then we might see some great mods from this.

THIS is how the game is finally going to shine. Like id's previous games, they laid the groundwork to have the community make it exactly what they want. There's a reason people are still playing Doom 1. The shooting, animations, and AI were great in this game, and I'm sure people have thought of ideas over these months as to what they'd do if they were given the tools. Typical classy form for id, and unexpected graciousness from Zenimax for permitting them to continue the tradition.

DrunkOnEstus:
THIS is how the game is finally going to shine. Like id's previous games, they laid the groundwork to have the community make it exactly what they want. There's a reason people are still playing Doom 1. The shooting, animations, and AI were great in this game, and I'm sure people have thought of ideas over these months as to what they'd do if they were given the tools. Typical classy form for id, and unexpected graciousness from Zenimax for permitting them to continue the tradition.

How's that unexpected of Zenimax? This is what they usually do (see: GECK, Doom 3's Source Code, Elder Scrolls Toolkit)

IanDavis:
its technology was universally praised.

Really? You and I remember very different versions of Rage. Considering the tech didn't work on PC for quite some time. I remember it got panned fairly universally rather than praised.

Frostbite3789:

IanDavis:
its technology was universally praised.

Really? You and I remember very different versions of Rage. Considering the tech didn't work on PC for quite some time. I remember it got panned fairly universally rather than praised.

I remember the same Rage as you. It was incredibly buggy to say the absoloute least. A real pain in the to keep working for such a poor title.

Frostbite3789:

IanDavis:
its technology was universally praised.

Really? You and I remember very different versions of Rage. Considering the tech didn't work on PC for quite some time. I remember it got panned fairly universally rather than praised.

Not the game itself, the technology it used. Here's a video about it from an Escapist contributor. It's quite a thing.

edit: I should add a bit of information Carmack shared on Twitter:
John Carmack ‏@ID_AA_Carmack
The toolkit release is not something that we consider consumer friendly, but it does let you get a look inside the construction process.

John Carmack ‏@ID_AA_Carmack
Doing significant work will require patience, because internally we use a 300 core renderfarm for megatexture creation.

poiumty:
While Rage might have been met with mixed reviews, its technology was universally praised.

wut

Joystiq.com:

"The world looks huge, and there's quite a bit of texture variety due to Id's new tech - when everything is standing still, it's pretty as a (post-asteroid-apocalypse) picture. But characters animate stiffly - they move like solid pieces of plastic, rather than multi-layered beings. Texture pop-in is omnipresent, and the lack of dynamic lighting occasionally gives everything the appearance of a badly Photoshopped DVD cover. In a year of visual standouts, RAGE is late to the party, and the emphasis on 60 fps hasn't yielded the sorts of benefits you'd hope for."

"The lack of any conventional multiplayer speaks volumes about RAGE's moment to moment shooting - it just doesn't work very well, and the controls aren't nearly as responsive as you'd expect, given RAGE's emphasis on sixty frames per second. "

The reviews were pretty clear... Rage wasn't well received by the critics because it didn't work. It was a broken game, the technology in it failed.

The reviews were very clear about it--they weren't lauding the technology, they were condemning its failure.

I'd just like to express my love for John Carmack. The guy is simply awesome. He's a computer genius, he has an amazing work ethics and he just hates patents. He loves open source software so much, he actually had to work around Doom 3 source-code himself in order to give players mod tools. I <3 Carmack!

Well, I hear Rage is a hell of an anaesthetic...

Seriously though, I don't see many people doing much with it since the game is so painfully average, and those who do won't get much recognition.

Since I rather liked the game, I find this to be pretty exciting. I could - quite possibly - make this game really REALLY madcap zany nonsense if I tried, and it would be awesome.

JEBWrench:
How's that unexpected of Zenimax? This is what they usually do (see: GECK, Doom 3's Source Code, Elder Scrolls Toolkit)

I"m guilty of spreading a bit of misinformation. I thought the Doom 3 source code was before the acquisition, and was unaware that the Fallout/Elder Scrolls modding kits were as expansive as id's efforts. I thought including all of the art assets and dev tools was above what things like GECK offered. My apologies.

EDIT: Some neat real information. The uncompressed artwork/textures total a little over 1 TB. I think this engine was meant as a "future-proof" concept like the original Cryengine was. I think with all the streaming that there was hope that id/Zenimax would be able to shop out tech 5 the way Epic does with UE3. It just...doesn't work as intended and needed even more time than the near decade it was given. There's so much texture work that isn't seen, and when it is it's amidst a hodge-podge of textures of varying quality.

If you read the patch notes, id recommends a 6-core processor at a minimum just to provide a sampling filter over the textures so that they aren't blurry up close. When I look at the "outside wasteland" in the game, it is certainly pretty but I don't think it's worth this. The game is proof that devs need to focus on the mechanics and rules, and the fun, because all those years, all that work, and all the power required represents an extreme amount of bloat in the race towards emulating realism.

Frostbite3789:

IanDavis:
its technology was universally praised.

Really? You and I remember very different versions of Rage. Considering the tech didn't work on PC for quite some time. I remember it got panned fairly universally rather than praised.

I believe that's where the "after a few good patches" caveat comes in. The release client of Rage was bugged to its eyeballs, barely compatible with vanilla-flavoured DirectX, and featured a distinct lack of any graphical options whatsoever.

Most of this was fixed through patches, and once the snags were ironed out, the tech indeed is pretty impressive.

[i]Rage[/s] still doesn't run at a playable level on my ATI card. Hopefully, someone in the community will make a mod that changes this. I hope they can, because all I saw when I looked at the game was lost potential.

Thirty five gigabytes. THIRTY FIVE GIGABYTES.
The modders will spend more time reading through that, than actually making anything.

But good non the less.

Am I the only one who thinks it might be possible to rebuild Midgard from Final Fantasy VII using it? The aesthetics when compared to the original opening cinematic are uncanny. Unfortunately, I'd still have to say good luck on the parts that are a bit more colorful outside the industrial metropolis.

Haven't played it yet myself, but from what I've seen a world map would be nice.

The other problem I have with it is that you get these awesome cars, beautiful landscapes and yet moving around is just a linear canyon leading from area to area. More open parts like in Borderlands would be nice.

King of Asgaard:
Well, I hear Rage is a hell of an anaesthetic...

Seriously though, I don't see many people doing much with it since the game is so painfully average, and those who do won't get much recognition.

While I will admit that the game itself was average those issues were mostly in the plot, pacing, and character depth department. Graphics (post patching) are stunning, the enemy AI is great, Controls are tight, and character animations (though repetitive at times) are fluid and beautiful compared to even recent games. Rage seemed to be more of a "look what the engine can do" game that stood alright on its own. Now they release the engine for the masses.

I am so looking forward to seeing what people can do with this.

Cpu46:

King of Asgaard:
Well, I hear Rage is a hell of an anaesthetic...

Seriously though, I don't see many people doing much with it since the game is so painfully average, and those who do won't get much recognition.

While I will admit that the game itself was average those issues were mostly in the plot, pacing, and character depth department. Graphics (post patching) are stunning, the enemy AI is great, Controls are tight, and character animations (though repetitive at times) are fluid and beautiful compared to even recent games. Rage seemed to be more of a "look what the engine can do" game that stood alright on its own. Now they release the engine for the masses.

I am so looking forward to seeing what people can do with this.

From what I've seen, you're not wrong, but when all a game has going for it is its visuals and one aspect of gameplay (I hear the shooting was quite good, if repetitive), all it amounts to is a decent experience that you'll forget five minutes after you finish it.
As you said, it was more of a tech demo for their engine rather than a well-thought-out experience.
In this case, I hope I'm proven wrong, as I've seen some spectacular mods released in the past for various games, but with RAGE's lower than ideal credentials, I don't see much brilliance coming out of it.

id, you have great Rage in your heart. Welcome to the Great Moding Corps.

Actually on PC shit still isn't ironed out, but it sure was top tech for consoles.

I can't really see this going far because you actually need a large community to pick up on this, which the game didn't get, and then you add the 35G just for mod tools plus 25 or so for the game and that isn't even unpacked assets... most likely meaning you need one hell of a rig just to set things up, this just isn't adding up to a prosperous modding community.
But hey it's nice that they did release it.

Would be nice for someone else to actually make a game out of this worth playing. It was one of the last games I bought at release for full price, for a very good reason.

MetalGenocide:
Thirty five gigabytes. THIRTY FIVE GIGABYTES.
The modders will spend more time reading through that, than actually making anything.

But good nonetheless.

Mr.K.:
and then you add the 35G just for mod tools plus 25 or so for the game and that isn't even unpacked assets...

Nah, the 35GB includes all game assets, which is why it's that big, and from the Bethsoft Blog:

Rage Toolkit welcome pdf:

The Tool Kit is initially 35 GB. If you run the 'buildAssets.cfg' like we recommend, it will generate
another 6 GB of data, bringing you up to 43 GB.

Cry Wolf:

Frostbite3789:

IanDavis:
its technology was universally praised.

Really? You and I remember very different versions of Rage. Considering the tech didn't work on PC for quite some time. I remember it got panned fairly universally rather than praised.

I remember the same Rage as you. It was incredibly buggy to say the absoloute least. A real pain in the to keep working for such a poor title.

Also it's lack of dynamic shadows.

Frostbite3789:

IanDavis:
its technology was universally praised.

Really? You and I remember very different versions of Rage. Considering the tech didn't work on PC for quite some time. I remember it got panned fairly universally rather than praised.

I remember the same version as you. It just plain didn't work on PC, and loaded extremely poorly on consoles. Everything was buggy with texture pop in up the ass, the whole thing was a mess. I bought Rage, played it for about 2 hours, then couldn't stand it anymore and haven't touched it since. It was pretty, sure, when you stood still for a while and let the game load, but that's really the only praise I can give the title. Maybe modders will be able to do something halfway decent with it, because id definitely couldn't.

Cool wasn't terrible hopefully the next doom is better :)

Kargathia:

Frostbite3789:

IanDavis:
its technology was universally praised.

Really? You and I remember very different versions of Rage. Considering the tech didn't work on PC for quite some time. I remember it got panned fairly universally rather than praised.

I believe that's where the "after a few good patches" caveat comes in. The release client of Rage was bugged to its eyeballs, barely compatible with vanilla-flavoured DirectX, and featured a distinct lack of any graphical options whatsoever.

Most of this was fixed through patches, and once the snags were ironed out, the tech indeed is pretty impressive.

Rage doesn't use DirectX, it's an OpenGL game. DirectX has nothing to do with what happened when Rage was released. It's nVidia and AMD's drivers that caused problems. Naturally, OpenGL isn't the most widely used API for video games, and as a consequence, nVidia and AMD's OpenGL drivers aren't kept up to date as often as DirectX. Now that's not to say that id wasn't at least partially at fault either.

id Software had already fixed the compatibility issues with OpenGL by the time Rage was released. The specifications for the driver update needed to run Rage properly had already been sent to nVidia and AMD when the game was released. nVidia was ahead of the game slightly, they already had beta drivers that fixed most of those issues. AMD wasn't so quick, it took them a week to get things running fine. Naturally, these issues should have been ironed out months before the game was released, so id's failure in this scheme is the fact that they may not have given the OpenGL fixes to the card manufacturers fast enough, or it could be that it was simply the card manufacturers that took their sweet time.

I won't presume to know what went on behind the scenes, but people like to pin the all the blame on id Software when the reality is that the card manufacturers must hold some of the blame as well.

Lot of hate for Rage. I bought it on whim for $20 and liked it...

Zer_:

Kargathia:

Frostbite3789:

Really? You and I remember very different versions of Rage. Considering the tech didn't work on PC for quite some time. I remember it got panned fairly universally rather than praised.

I believe that's where the "after a few good patches" caveat comes in. The release client of Rage was bugged to its eyeballs, barely compatible with vanilla-flavoured DirectX, and featured a distinct lack of any graphical options whatsoever.

Most of this was fixed through patches, and once the snags were ironed out, the tech indeed is pretty impressive.

Rage doesn't use DirectX, it's an OpenGL game. DirectX has nothing to do with what happened when Rage was released. It's nVidia and AMD's drivers that caused problems. Naturally, OpenGL isn't the most widely used API for video games, and as a consequence, nVidia and AMD's OpenGL drivers aren't kept up to date as often as DirectX. Now that's not to say that id wasn't at least partially at fault either.

id Software had already fixed the compatibility issues with OpenGL by the time Rage was released. The specifications for the driver update needed to run Rage properly had already been sent to nVidia and AMD when the game was released. nVidia was ahead of the game slightly, they already had beta drivers that fixed most of those issues. AMD wasn't so quick, it took them a week to get things running fine. Naturally, these issues should have been ironed out months before the game was released, so id's failure in this scheme is the fact that they may not have given the OpenGL fixes to the card manufacturers fast enough, or it could be that it was simply the card manufacturers that took their sweet time.

I won't presume to know what went on behind the scenes, but people like to pin the all the blame on id Software when the reality is that the card manufacturers must hold some of the blame as well.

You're not doing a very good job at all on selling anyone that this is anything bot id's fault here.

Choosing to use technology in a way that doesn't work for the two most common pieces of hardware is a deliberate fail, rather than a nondeliberate fail. How is it the card manufacturer's fault that id CHOSE to implement OpenGL in a way they KNEW was non-functional?

PoolCleaningRobot:
Lot of hate for Rage. I bought it on whim for $20 and liked it...

For those of us that were looking forward to the game and pre-ordered it, it left a very bitter taste in our mouths.

DracoSuave:

Zer_:

Kargathia:

I believe that's where the "after a few good patches" caveat comes in. The release client of Rage was bugged to its eyeballs, barely compatible with vanilla-flavoured DirectX, and featured a distinct lack of any graphical options whatsoever.

Most of this was fixed through patches, and once the snags were ironed out, the tech indeed is pretty impressive.

Rage doesn't use DirectX, it's an OpenGL game. DirectX has nothing to do with what happened when Rage was released. It's nVidia and AMD's drivers that caused problems. Naturally, OpenGL isn't the most widely used API for video games, and as a consequence, nVidia and AMD's OpenGL drivers aren't kept up to date as often as DirectX. Now that's not to say that id wasn't at least partially at fault either.

id Software had already fixed the compatibility issues with OpenGL by the time Rage was released. The specifications for the driver update needed to run Rage properly had already been sent to nVidia and AMD when the game was released. nVidia was ahead of the game slightly, they already had beta drivers that fixed most of those issues. AMD wasn't so quick, it took them a week to get things running fine. Naturally, these issues should have been ironed out months before the game was released, so id's failure in this scheme is the fact that they may not have given the OpenGL fixes to the card manufacturers fast enough, or it could be that it was simply the card manufacturers that took their sweet time.

I won't presume to know what went on behind the scenes, but people like to pin the all the blame on id Software when the reality is that the card manufacturers must hold some of the blame as well.

You're not doing a very good job at all on selling anyone that this is anything bot id's fault here.

Choosing to use technology in a way that doesn't work for the two most common pieces of hardware is a deliberate fail, rather than a nondeliberate fail. How is it the card manufacturer's fault that id CHOSE to implement OpenGL in a way they KNEW was non-functional?

You have no idea how this stuff works, do you? It's not uncommon for a developer to create a game (especially when using a new engine), and basically tell card manufacturers "Hey, this is how our engine works, and here are the tweaks that need to be made to make it run well on your hardware." On id's side, they already had a working set of drivers that ran the game smoothly. The problem is that these drivers were not ready in time for the game's release. Whether or not that is id's fault, or the card manufacturers is anyone's guess. Personally, I'll split the blame between id and the card manufacturers.

If you honestly believe that developing a new game engine with new rendering methods would run perfectly without a proper driver update to better support the engine, then you'd be wrong. It doesn't matter whether id used OpenGL or DirectX in this case, both APIs would have needed an update.

id's choice to use OpenGL is a simple one, it's better than DirectX 9. At the time, Carmack was familiar with DirectX 9 and OpenGL. When you compare the two, OpenGL was flat out superior. Now, more recently, Carmack has admitted that DirectX 10 and 11 are excellent graphics APIs. Microsoft went ahead and recoded the entire API to be much cleaner and far more efficient, something that Carmack admitted himself. At the time of Rage's conception, the choices were OpenGL, DirectX 9, and DirectX 10. It didn't make much sense for id to use DirectX 10 since most people didn't even own cards that could use it.

You should read up on the history of DirectX and OpenGL to better understand Carmack's choice in using OpenGL over DirectX.

The Power?
What power?
The power of voodoo!

As with every other mod kit of engine ever, a handful of people will come up with something good and hundreds will start trying to do something great and then realize how much they suck and eventually give up.

Zer_:

Kargathia:

Frostbite3789:

Really? You and I remember very different versions of Rage. Considering the tech didn't work on PC for quite some time. I remember it got panned fairly universally rather than praised.

I believe that's where the "after a few good patches" caveat comes in. The release client of Rage was bugged to its eyeballs, barely compatible with vanilla-flavoured DirectX, and featured a distinct lack of any graphical options whatsoever.

Most of this was fixed through patches, and once the snags were ironed out, the tech indeed is pretty impressive.

Rage doesn't use DirectX, it's an OpenGL game. DirectX has nothing to do with what happened when Rage was released. It's nVidia and AMD's drivers that caused problems. Naturally, OpenGL isn't the most widely used API for video games, and as a consequence, nVidia and AMD's OpenGL drivers aren't kept up to date as often as DirectX. Now that's not to say that id wasn't at least partially at fault either.

id Software had already fixed the compatibility issues with OpenGL by the time Rage was released. The specifications for the driver update needed to run Rage properly had already been sent to nVidia and AMD when the game was released. nVidia was ahead of the game slightly, they already had beta drivers that fixed most of those issues. AMD wasn't so quick, it took them a week to get things running fine. Naturally, these issues should have been ironed out months before the game was released, so id's failure in this scheme is the fact that they may not have given the OpenGL fixes to the card manufacturers fast enough, or it could be that it was simply the card manufacturers that took their sweet time.

I won't presume to know what went on behind the scenes, but people like to pin the all the blame on id Software when the reality is that the card manufacturers must hold some of the blame as well.

Derp. My mistake there. I knew quite a lot of the initial problems were caused by driver issues, and sort of autohabitually typed "DirectX".
If I recall correctly there still needed to be additional work done on drivers (possibly even at time of release), as id was internally running a homecooked driver version, which was unsuitable for general release, as it'd create all sorts of problems with other games.

On the whole it's probably close to irrelevant to figure out whom to assign blame to. Things went haywire, and as a direct result Rage bombed.

Damn it, I came into this thread expecting something related to the Hulk. Now I am just sad.

35GB for your delicious baked textures!

Seeing the recent UE4 tech, gotta wonder what the hell id's been up to.

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