World's First Cyborg Speaks Out

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Just to play devils advocate, there IS a reason why he is calling himself a cyborg and not someone with cochlear implants or a pacemaker. Those pieces of technology fix or enable senses that the person already has, fixing problems with systems the body already has in places. This thing gives him the ability to hear colors, an ability that he wouldn't have even if he had no handicap. And yes, Synesthesia is a thing that some people have, but that doesn't mean that it doesn't count as an extension beyond his normal ability: if a brain implant gave someone perfect memory, id count that as a cyborg even though there are people who have that ability naturally.

Ill agree that it is a pretty underwhelming cybernetic for someone calling themselves the first cyborg, but it only makes sense that the FIRST would be a pretty crappy enhancement, and better ones come later. I may in general be underwhelmed, but I DO think the very fact that we can say that a Cyborg Foundation exists is about the coolest thing ever.

There seems to be a lot of ignorance in this thread. People with enhancements to help them hear or see are judged pretty quickly by people and the majority don't see the consequences. One of my friends is deaf and she loves music. She has an implant to help her hear but for the most part she speaks in sign and uses the implant only when she has to. You can imagine the looks she gets, but its because people don't understand that you aren't different if you love something differently to someone else.

I agree that cyborg rights are going to be much more of an issue as it is more recognised in society. People are scared of new perspectives but spreading hate and malice against people who choose to use implants or other devices to enhance their lives is ignorance at every level. Lose a sense for a day, any one, and I guarantee you'll look for a way to get that back, even if its using your other senses to interpret for you.

There is also the argument of having implants out of want rather than need. I'm on the side of the want. If you want better sight, better hearing, stronger arms etc, it should be available to you. Cosmetic surgery is available to people who want to improve their image, so why can't implants be available to improve your abilities? In the next few years augmentation in general is going to be an issue so it is best to discuss it now so we won't have prejudice when it becomes the norm. Change is scary to some people but when you consider what the internet did for our generation, it seems that some fears aren't justified.

Xanadu84:
Just to play devils advocate, there IS a reason why he is calling himself a cyborg and not someone with cochlear implants or a pacemaker. Those pieces of technology fix or enable senses that the person already has, fixing problems with systems the body already has in places. This thing gives him the ability to hear colors, an ability that he wouldn't have even if he had no handicap. And yes, Synesthesia is a thing that some people have, but that doesn't mean that it doesn't count as an extension beyond his normal ability: if a brain implant gave someone perfect memory, id count that as a cyborg even though there are people who have that ability naturally.

Ill agree that it is a pretty underwhelming cybernetic for someone calling themselves the first cyborg, but it only makes sense that the FIRST would be a pretty crappy enhancement, and better ones come later. I may in general be underwhelmed, but I DO think the very fact that we can say that a Cyborg Foundation exists is about the coolest thing ever.

Its not the fact that he is calling himself a Cyborg that people take issue with, its the fact that he is calling himself the FIRST cyborg.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_Mann

Mr Mann has a passport dating back to 1995 showing the government recognized his cybernetic implant as part of him, that gives him 9 years on Mr Harbisson who was officialy recognized as a cyborg in 2004, and first got interested in it in 2003.

Mojo:
Wow, pretty damn amazing.
Maybe in the future well be able to make blind people "see" with sounds, like bats do, or something...

So, where are my Biotic Amps then, huh?

Soon, my friend. First, we must reach Mars.

Until his eyeborg can shoot lasers, I am going to file this under "mildly interesting".

Latinidiot:

Mojo:
Wow, pretty damn amazing.
Maybe in the future well be able to make blind people "see" with sounds, like bats do, or something...

So, where are my Biotic Amps then, huh?

Soon, my friend. First, we must reach Mars.

Well, we still got about a 100 years before the reapers come, so I guess no hurry right?

Captcha: "sharp stick" Think we might need more then that though.

kyogen:
The key criterion for being a cyborg is the visibility of the implant? Interesting. So everyone with a pacemaker so well integrated into their bodies that they don't notice it is not a cyborg, or is it just that old folks who spend most of their time ignoring the tech implants aren't cool?

Exactly. We've had cyborgs for decades now, no matter which way you want to define it. The first person with an artificial heart; the first person with a brain implant that allows them to control a mechanical apparatus, like an arm or a computer cursor; that guy who put a chip in his wrist that can open electronic doors; the first person with a cochlear implant; hell, even our pets are cyborgs with the tracking systems we put in them. And what about pirates, huh? With their peg legs and hook hands? Anyone who has integrated technology with their body is a cyborg, this guy is not new.

Ah, but of course, his passport says he's a cyborg, so he must really be the first one. After all, the law says so.

...and of course within two posts of this thread being started, someone made the Deus Ex - Human Revolution ref. *sigh*

I, personally, would like to see where this technology will take us now that we know it will work. Perhaps we can develop implants that will cure certain physical impairments once thought incurable.

Well this is fucking scary.
Skynet is coming everyone.

Holy fuckballs. This is huge.

People are really underplaying this. This is literally a method to alter human senses. It's also frightening, since we know little to nothing about the people actually producing and researching this technology. If they can alter one part of the brain, they could learn to alter others.

And I know this has been said before, but this is literally the first proof we have that equipment can alter the human brain for a long term. I may be wrong, though. Not up to date with everything in modern science.

GamemasterAnthony:
...and of course within two posts of this thread being started, someone made the Deus Ex - Human Revolution ref. *sigh*

I, personally, would like to see where this technology will take us now that we know it will work. Perhaps we can develop implants that will cure certain physical impairments once thought incurable.

We, uh, already did.

In fact, many of the cyborgs with REAL claim to "first cyborg" according to various definitions had such impairments.

He's not the first cyborg by any definition that doesn't include "horribly pretentious".

Zulnam:
Holy fuckballs. This is huge.

People are really underplaying this. This is literally a method to alter human senses. It's also frightening, since we know little to nothing about the people actually producing and researching this technology. If they can alter one part of the brain, they could learn to alter others.

And I know this has been said before, but this is literally the first proof we have that equipment can alter the human brain for a long term. I may be wrong, though. Not up to date with everything in modern science.

Uh. Didn't even notice this.

No, this is not REMOTELY first proof. The first proof is from decades ago, and it used to be a thriving field of study until it got hampered by moral panic regarding the experiments. No, those people permanently crippled and insane due to botched experiments had nothing to do with it, why?

(So okay, the regulation was necessary, but it went too far, and essentially halted the field for a few decades.)

Here I was expecting a guy with a borg lasereye in place of one of this normal ones. I am disappointed.

Commissar Sae:

Chemical Alia:
Awesome technology! My grandfather was totally colorblind and loved new technology, he probably would have loved this.

I'm no cyborg, but my brain does something just the opposite. When I hear music or tonal sounds, I perceive a specific color along with it. My piano teacher thought I was crazy.

There is actually a medical condition for that, it's called Synesthesia and it is actually pretty cool. Kandynsky was a famous case of it.

OT: I'm always pro-cyborg enhancement, so this is just cool.

Well, in his case it's an awesome net benefit. For me, it's usually just pretty annoying, like it's really hard to concentrate when music is playing v:

Mojo:

Latinidiot:

Mojo:
Wow, pretty damn amazing.
Maybe in the future well be able to make blind people "see" with sounds, like bats do, or something...

So, where are my Biotic Amps then, huh?

Soon, my friend. First, we must reach Mars.

Well, we still got about a 100 years before the reapers come, so I guess no hurry right?

Captcha: "sharp stick" Think we might need more then that though.

Nono, just a sharp stick and a can do attitude!

And the better part of Commander Shepard.

Adam Jensen:
And what's the first thing he did with this amazing gift? He made a painting of Justin Bieber's song. How delightful.

I was wondering when you'd show up :P
OT: That quote has got to be one of the most beautiful things I've ever heard... symbiosis of man it's own machinisms.
It's quite godlike. I wouldn't mind being part of that.

One step closer to perfection.

image

Resistance is futile.

I'm very taken back by this.

You can have colors as a sound in your brain? That's very interesting, but makes my head hurt trying to imagine.
Still, he seems to be happy and I- for one, approve of cyborg rights. Seriously who kicks someone out without at least asking what the device on their head is for? Doesn't look like a camera, and he obviously is browsing >_>

Still, I would love to see what we come up with next. Thought movies- where you download your thoughts into the computer and it plays like a movie ... dude, that would be the coolest thing ever. Anything can be done with such a masterpiece!!

I hope cyborg arms and organs are available soon, I want to enter an arm wrestling competition with my robo-arm.

I hope everything get's all Deus Ex Human Revolution by 2024 because, and you would too, I'd totally replace my arms with super metal arms that have swords instead of elbows.

Yeah nah, this guy isn't a cyborg, he is a pretentious "artist" with a pair of stupid headphones with a camera. Thisguy is a cyborg, none of that hearing colours crap.

So aren't people with pacemakers and other types of artificial implants technically cyborgs? In that case, he's not the first cyborg and this article should be changed.

A) Why and how are any of his rights being infringed upon here?

B) Does he really count as a cyborg? He can't control any machinery with his mind, and without his enhancement, he'd only be colourblind, not dead. By this standard, anyone who's had lasik surgery, a stomach staple, or a pacemaker is a cyborg.

Purposely giving people with a sense deficiency Synesthesia is a pretty awesome idea. I'll put this with the sensors that blind people can wear that administers a tiny tiny electrical shock to to their tongue. They then are teaching their brain how to see through an alternate sense organ. This is SCIENCE!

OniaPL:
Rather than developing this kind of technology, wouldn't it be more effective to dump that cash in something like gene therapy and gene research? Being able to use a vector to put a properly working, dominative allele in the place of one of the recessive alleles that cause achromatopsia (or being able to find the recessive gene and deal with it during the embryo/fetus phase) would be far better than just sticking a machine into someone's head and make them "hear" sounds.

That'd be a future where I'd like to live.

I don't know if this has been addressed already: There is actually so little known about the genome and the epigenetic landscape, it just doesn't make sense not seek out other ways of solving problems. That is what nature did in evolution. Our brains, for instance has many systems that overlap and do the same or similar things. Take our sense of sight for instance, it's the newest sense in the grand scheme of life on this planet. The sense of sight is only about 900 Million years old, and in a lot of ways a lot more powerful than other senses. Olfaction, conversely, is the oldest and has a lot more connections in our brain. Olfaction predates the corpus callosum and is tied to our memory, our perception of the world independent of our phrenological sense of what the brain does and how it handles information. It literally has neurological connection to our brain stem. Unlike our sense of Sight.

But, back to Genes. There is only a handful of conditions out of potentially millions, many of which we don't know even exist (this number is compiled from the nearly uncountable ways a system can break down and perform incorrectly or detrimentally) that have direct genetic links to specific genes. For instance, Sickle Cell Anemia is tied to one or few known gene mutations. In the case of Sickle Cell Anemia, the genetic factor was known years before the human genome project finished what it started. If you were to dump the lions share of all research money into genetic alterations, perhaps designer virus' that can change the function of cell in an already living person (still only really the stuff of modern science fiction), or to research what is wrong with someone before they are born, or even just to understand exactly what can go wrong, we are talking decades of research. People are somewhat misinformed about the state of our understanding of genetics. Really, we probably know 1000th of 1 Percent, if we are lucky. But the media and science magazines, research papers and collegiate science centers give the impression of more than what has been accomplished. Really, the most fantastic things are still to come, some things that I doubt anyone can even imagine at this point in time. It's all very exciting.

That said, it only makes sense for people to research direct ways of helping the afflicted on what is known. It was through the aforementioned idea of giving blind people site by sensor and electrical shock on their tongue or a harness on the back that this idea was probably birthed. Or, it follows the same thought, even if it's not based off of that idea directly. Modern Neuroscience has shown us that the eyes are sense organ and it's the brain itself that sees. This is a logical extension of that very idea.

But, I digress. The subjects of genetics and neuroscience have been the bulk of my reading in recent years. I'm obviously no expert. But I wanted to put my two cents into your comment.

TheVampwizimp:

kyogen:
The key criterion for being a cyborg is the visibility of the implant? Interesting. So everyone with a pacemaker so well integrated into their bodies that they don't notice it is not a cyborg, or is it just that old folks who spend most of their time ignoring the tech implants aren't cool?

Exactly. We've had cyborgs for decades now, no matter which way you want to define it. The first person with an artificial heart; the first person with a brain implant that allows them to control a mechanical apparatus, like an arm or a computer cursor; that guy who put a chip in his wrist that can open electronic doors; the first person with a cochlear implant; hell, even our pets are cyborgs with the tracking systems we put in them. And what about pirates, huh? With their peg legs and hook hands? Anyone who has integrated technology with their body is a cyborg, this guy is not new.

Ah, but of course, his passport says he's a cyborg, so he must really be the first one. After all, the law says so.

A minor nitpick: unless the modification is cybernetic, one is not a cyb(ernetic)org(anism). A peg leg does not do it.

MrGalactus:
A) Why and how are any of his rights being infringed upon here?

B) Does he really count as a cyborg? He can't control any machinery with his mind, and without his enhancement, he'd only be colourblind, not dead. By this standard, anyone who's had lasik surgery, a stomach staple, or a pacemaker is a cyborg.

I'll do this for the whole thread if I have to. Lasik surgery and stomach staples are not cybernetic. Therefore, no cyborg.

itchcrotch:
Oh dear, not long before we're calling "cyborg" a discriminatory term...
More like, "partially mechanised individual"!
And my spell check doesn't even recognise "cyborg". COME ON!!
Capthca: "we are the future". Ominous...

It appears the captcha is an old man.

Nieroshai:

MrGalactus:
A) Why and how are any of his rights being infringed upon here?

B) Does he really count as a cyborg? He can't control any machinery with his mind, and without his enhancement, he'd only be colourblind, not dead. By this standard, anyone who's had lasik surgery, a stomach staple, or a pacemaker is a cyborg.

I'll do this for the whole thread if I have to. Lasik surgery and stomach staples are not cybernetic. Therefore, no cyborg.

What would we count as cybernetic?

Good, now get on on working of putting my brains in robotic body, i grow tired of this bag of meat.

Dr. McD:

itchcrotch:
Oh dear, not long before we're calling "cyborg" a discriminatory term...
More like, "partially mechanised individual"!
And my spell check doesn't even recognise "cyborg". COME ON!!
Capthca: "we are the future". Ominous...

It appears the captcha is an old man.

I dunno, there's a hole list of hardware and software I'd willingly swap out for;D

kyogen:
The key criterion for being a cyborg is the visibility of the implant? Interesting. So everyone with a pacemaker so well integrated into their bodies that they don't notice it is not a cyborg, or is it just that old folks who spend most of their time ignoring the tech implants aren't cool?

So if I glue my cellphone to my face, I'm a cyborg?

O.T.

Interesting, but there are far more advanced techs that are more credibly cybernetic than this, Cochlear implants are the first to come to mind, second are the thought controlled cybernetic arm prostheses that we are using right now for amputees. within 30 years at present rate we'll be using integrated iris implants that can not only make the blind see but can also provide a HUD that monitors blood chemistry and heart rate as well. We will begin genetically engineering humans eventually to never be blind, but the repercussions of such an act will have some serious moral implications.(Gattaca)

MrGalactus:

Nieroshai:

MrGalactus:
A) Why and how are any of his rights being infringed upon here?

B) Does he really count as a cyborg? He can't control any machinery with his mind, and without his enhancement, he'd only be colourblind, not dead. By this standard, anyone who's had lasik surgery, a stomach staple, or a pacemaker is a cyborg.

I'll do this for the whole thread if I have to. Lasik surgery and stomach staples are not cybernetic. Therefore, no cyborg.

What would we count as cybernetic?

Logic-driven mechanisms, such as circuitry. The definition can easily be looked up, how is it hard to do one's own learning instead of prompting further forum dialogue?

Mistake post

it seems silly, but its probably for the best that we get this all sorted out right now before we get to the point were the guys with tanks for arms get angry at us.

Cyrromatic:
He did not ask for this.

Actually I think he did.

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