EA Asserts Customers Enjoy Microtransactions

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EA Asserts Customers Enjoy Microtransactions

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EA wants to ensure that every one of its games has microtransaction options.

The phrase "majority rules" gets thrown around a lot in democratic societies, but it turns out that the same principle applies to commerce. While many gamer forumites decry the advent of the microtransaction, nothing can staunch the flow of new titles that support it - at least not from Electronic Arts. Microtransactions have been so successful for the large publisher that it wants to include them in every upcoming game. The logic behind the decision is that consumers both want and like this system.

"We are building into all of our games the ability to pay for things along the way; to get to a higher level, to buy a new characters; to buy a truck or gun or whatever it might be," says Blake Jorgensen, EA's CFO. "And consumers are enjoying and embracing that way of business." Consumers have spoken with their wallets regarding microtransactions, but EA has also taken steps to ensure that its own coffers won't take a hit. Whereas credit card transactions were formerly handled by third parties, EA has brought those systems in-house, increasing each purchase's profitability.

For those of you who like microtransactions, this is, of course, good news. Jorgensen's statement certainly sounds as though every EA game will have this option going forward. Otherwise, the purchases are still totally optional, but one wonders what kind of long-term effects this will have on the industry. If a $60 boxed copy plus smaller purchases ad infinitum becomes the new de facto business model, developers could start tweaking game design to accommodate it. The next console generation is going to be an interesting one, either way.

Source: GameSpot

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Micro transactions or 60$ launch price EA - it's one or the other. I'm glad all the talent left Bioware so I won't be missing to on any games when I boycott EA

"People will pay for it" does not equal "people like it."

And personally, as long as they're optional, I don't give a damn.

Just stop playing the poor starving game company card if you're going to do this.

Marshall Honorof:
Consumers have spoken with their wallets regarding microtransactions

Because there's a way to vote against microtransactions with your wallets.

Further proof that EA doesn't have a clue what gamers are going through in this economy.

tehwalrus:
I'm glad all the talent left Bioware so I won't be missing to on any games when I boycott EA

BioWare needs to get away from this company. It's ruining their stuff. I'll be paying attention to what the talent that left does. I hope they make a whole new development company.

Well maybe, just maybe, they'll get of that 60 usd mark for new games. But who am I kidding, of course they won't.

As always, EA's attitude disgusts me.
I'm just glad they're not releasing anything of worth anymore. It makes ignoring their releases easier.

A dark road to travel. Microtransactions are a good thing if done properly, but EA has a history of messing up simple things. Some rules for microtransactions:
1: No pay-for-power. This is rule number one. A player who doesn't use his wallet in game should never feel like he's hopelessly outgunned by someone who does. If something can boost your power, it must be unlock able in ways other than with money. Team fortress did it perfectly. If you want to rush for the new gun, buy it. If you don't have money, work towards crafting it.
2: if you plan to make money from this system you must lower the price of the game. Don't be greedy! 60 bucks plus a microtransaction is greedy and will alienate those on a limited budget. People are also much more willing to spend money on your marketplace if they didn't spend money on the game.

As a person who hates his hobbies, I'm glad EA is taking this stance. For example, when I want to play hockey, I just pay someone to skate around for me, after all, I'm much too busy to score goals myself. I'm glad I'm now able to take the same approach to video games!

We do enjoy micro-transactions EA, just not when YOU use them.

Hunter85792:

That was a lot easier to read than the spoiler warning implied, I thought I was going to get some Abe Simpson ramblings here.

I'm pretty sure you're saying you don't like EA's business practices in general but that they exist for a reason other than just flat out greed.

Ugh. Look, there's nothing wrong with microtransactions, but there is something VERY wrong about hoe EA handles them. It has led to very poor design decisions in multiple products of theirs.

For example: now I like Mass Effect, but one part I can't stand is the multiplayer. "But what the hell is wrong with it Val?" you might ask. "It's Gears of War's Horde Mode, but with Mass Effect's combat! It's a great concept!", and I'd agree, it is a fantastic concept. The problem is how it's executed: in Gears, you don't have a progression system with weapons and skills, meaning everyone enters with the same potential of capabilities, making true skill and teamwork the key factors of gameplay. With Mass Effect, they put in a system that kneecaps you the moment you get in, making the game ridiculously difficult, even on easy mode, and on top of that makes getting the necessary weapon upgrades very difficult, as well as random, minimizing your chances of getting the loadout that would most naturally work for you. It makes a system where pay-to-win is incentivized.

Another blunder here in this regard comes in the form of a little game on IOS systems called Mass Effect: Infiltrator. I got this on my Ipod a while back because I wanted more Mass Effect, and a little time-waster for my slow nights at work would really be fun. However, it is kneecapped with the same problems as Mass Effect 3's multiplayer mode: an artificially stemmed progression system that incentivizes the microtransactions. I never finished the game, which was a shame, since in Mass Effect tradition it did have an interesting story.

The way they handled that system killed my interest in their products. And they ARE products, not services. I paid $80 for a package of data that's supposed to do this, this, and this, and it didn't deliver. The way EA sees it, you might as well be paying for bug fixes that fix bugs that were created just so you'd pay extra to make them go away.

Due to the lack of evidence to the contrary and based on how Mr. Jorgensen never expressed anything against it, I think it is safe to assume that Mr. Jorgensen enjoys and embraces swift and hard kicks to the nuts. I feel like somebody must oblige him as soon as possible.

tehwalrus:
Micro transactions or 60$ launch price EA - it's one or the other. I'm glad all the talent left Bioware so I won't be missing to on any games when I boycott EA

This is my exact stance.

If you want to charge 60 dollars, ok il buy the game, if you want to have microtransactions ok, I will buy a few if I like the game, but if you want to charge 60 dollars and want more money from me in microtransactions... Well then you can just go fuck yourself with a rusty pitchfork.

Oh inb4 Thrikeen finds the thread and comes to the defense of EA

Game Market. Crash already.

How much does a solid kick to the testicles cost these days? Assuming I'm a UK taxpayer.

So what kind of microtransactions is Dragon Age 3 going to have?

Is there going to be item crafting in the game and you buy components? Or will it be as simple as buying gold?

And of course what EA fails to realize is that the micro transaction model makes 90% of its money from 10% of its audience. If this goes too far, then... Well... Eventually the only customers EA will have left are that 10% of their original audience.

i'd like to introduce EA to the concept of fiscal responsibility; if you are not able to pay your staff from the revenue made from a 60€ game (which is more than 60$, but that is beside the point) then you should not expect us to pay for upgrades/weapons/flowers/lolipops/....... just so you can make a quick buck, instead you should focus on delivering a quality product that people like to buy for full price.

i am not oposed to microtransactions in free-to-play-games like league of legends or planetside 2 where you can unlock everything you need through playing the game but can also buy the same stuff if you have more money but less time on your hands, but asking for full price and microtransactions is just greedy in a bad way.

an annoyed writer:
For example: now I like Mass Effect, but one part I can't stand is the multiplayer. "But what the hell is wrong with it Val?" you might ask. "It's Gears of War's Horde Mode, but with Mass Effect's combat! It's a great concept!", and I'd agree, it is a fantastic concept. The problem is how it's executed: in Gears, you don't have a progression system with weapons and skills, meaning everyone enters with the same potential of capabilities, making true skill and teamwork the key factors of gameplay. With Mass Effect, they put in a system that kneecaps you the moment you get in, making the game ridiculously difficult, even on easy mode, and on top of that makes getting the necessary weapon upgrades very difficult, as well as random, minimizing your chances of getting the loadout that would most naturally work for you. It makes a system where pay-to-win is incentivized.

See, this one to me is the worst of microtransactions, not because of pay-to-win, but because there's no way to buy what you want. I would happily have given some money to buy specific classes if I could, but I can't and so instead of spending some money and lots of time I spend some time and no money.

what...I......what.....WHY?
oh god why?
how does that monster BREATHE (or EA executives, for that matter)?
why is it still alive?
oh god the crash cannot come soon enough...

Teoes:
How much does a solid kick to the testicles cost these days? Assuming I'm a UK taxpayer.

I'd like to know that as well.
Are there multiple versions that are differently taxed, depending on speed and angle?
will they be within an affordable price range, at least some of them?
I guess it's time for a field study, this question must not be left unanswered.

Huh..I'm glad EA does nothing of interest to me as of late. I can just walk by the microtransactions fiasco and not care a bit.

And that is why we fail. All it would've taken to put an end to this shit is enough people NOT buying into those microtransactions, but apparently not enough people had the will power to do so.

If EA keeps up this strategy I would not be surprised if EA games end up costing more than systems that run them.

Whatever happened to EA saying games prices should come down? *looks at EA stock* oh...right thats why.

Enjoy Microtransactions? nope, no I don't, not at all.

I would like to meet these people who like EA's way of handling micro-transactions. I don't think they are real... or educated. I would like to educate them.

Oh for god's sake EA, just grow a twirly mustache already.

ITT: People angry about something that'll never affect them if they don't choose to use it.

They weren't a big deal in Dead Space 3 (at least not to the people who weren't trying to make them a big deal), but hey, it's EA trying to make money, so fuck them I guess.

*sigh.

canadamus_prime:
And that is why we fail. All it would've taken to put an end to this shit is enough people NOT buying into those microtransactions, but apparently not enough people had the will power to do so.

Like someone said earlier, EA is most like making 90% of the micro-transaction money from 10% of the people playing their games. Odds are high that 10% is fulled with people who don't give a kitten, whether it's kids with parents buying their games, rich people or 'casuals' who just want whatever it is they want now and don't know the first thing about the industry, let alone think about how buying materials for Isaac's new gun might influence future games.

Yeah we LOVE microtransactions..... On games that are free... or $20 on release..... NOT $70 FOR THE FUCKING COLLECTORS STILL MISSING SHIT EDITION!

EA asserts they know what they're doing.

Gamers hilarity ensues.

As usual EA shows how much they don't understand reality. Wait what? REALITY? That's not in their vocabulary. They live in a make-believe world.

Phlakes:
ITT: People angry about something that'll never affect them if they don't choose to use it.

They weren't a big deal in Dead Space 3 (at least not to the people who weren't trying to make them a big deal), but hey, it's EA trying to make money, so fuck them I guess.

*sigh.

So you don't see how business directly affecting game balance can affect the whole game experience even if you "don't choose to use it"?

tehwalrus:

canadamus_prime:
And that is why we fail. All it would've taken to put an end to this shit is enough people NOT buying into those microtransactions, but apparently not enough people had the will power to do so.

Like someone said earlier, EA is most like making 90% of the micro-transaction money from 10% of the people playing their games. Odds are high that 10% is fulled with people who don't give a kitten, whether it's kids with parents buying their games, rich people or 'casuals' who just want whatever it is they want now and don't know the first thing about the industry, let alone think about how buying materials for Isaac's new gun might influence future games.

Yeah I suppose that's probably true too. All EA is probably seeing are the numbers in their bank account.

Oh for fucks sake. Will Anonymous just hurry up and hack these assholes into oblivion already? At this rate, you'll have to pay for the entire game piece meal, on top of the $60 entrance fee.

I'm seriously considering ditching gaming for good and, I dunno, taking up machreme, or knitting or something.

Rainforce:
what...I......what.....WHY?
oh god why?
how does that monster BREATHE (or EA executives, for that matter)?
why is it still alive?
oh god the crash cannot come soon enough...

Teoes:
How much does a solid kick to the testicles cost these days? Assuming I'm a UK taxpayer.

I'd like to know that as well.
Are there multiple versions that are differently taxed, depending on speed and angle?
will they be within an affordable price range, at least some of them?
I guess it's time for a field study, this question must not be left unanswered.

See now you are getting in to the pricey ones. The transcontinental kick is going to be a pretty penny with the conversion and the agency fees to hire the third party for the actual kick.

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