Chair With DRM Collapses After Being Sat On Eight Times

 Pages 1 2 3 NEXT
 

Chair With DRM Collapses After Being Sat On Eight Times

A team of creators explore the scary thought of Digital Rights Management protocols being applied to real-world objects.

DRM is hated at its worst, tolerated at its best, and is (at the moment) exclusive to digital media: videogames, movies, ebooks and music. "Limited installs," which limit the amount of times you can re-install a game, is a form of DRM most PC gamers have wrestled with at one point or another. But what if such DRM was applied to real-world objects? A team of creators working on a global project called The Deconstruction have put together the world's first "DRM Chair," which falls apart after being used just eight times.

At a casual glance, the DRM Chair looks just like your average everyday wooden chair. However, a special built-in mechanism and sensor count how many people have sat in it, emitting a loud clicking noise to indicate the number of uses left after a person stands up. After eight people have used the chair, its joints start smoking, melting the special material that holds the chair together and causing it to collapse into a heap of parts after just a few seconds.

The Deconstruction is a global project for creators, described as "a game about re-thinking the world as we know it, taking it apart, making a few adjustments, then putting it back together a little awesome-er." Teams participate by thinking up and building projects in a short time frame. The DRM Chair was thought up and put together in just 48 hours.

The chair certainly makes some interesting commentary about the nature of DRM, and how something we have come to begrudgingly accept on our digital media seems absolutely absurd when applied to real-world objects. Most recently, "Always-Online" DRM has been making gamers froth at the mouth. Ubisoft vowed to discontinue the practice after heavy criticism, while EA's recent SimCity launch was a complete disaster, mostly due to its always-online requirement.

Source: Cnet

Permalink

Compare real life to piracy: YOU CAN'T DO THAT ITS DIGITAL MEDIA AND COMPLETELY DIFFERENT, YOUR ARGUMENT IS INVALID!
Compare DRM to real life: Yeah that's right, this totally supports my ideas and shows how right I am!

It's a fun little absurdity but by no means anywhere near a valid comparison. Still, it's an interesting idea.

Now I want to see an always-online table. Or a way to reconstitute the chair after donating talking to customer service...

Honestly, I feel like this gets the point across better http://wearcam.org/seatsale/ but still a good project.

*starts downloading "chair.torrent"*

It's a good thing DRM does not happen with physical things.

Please don't ban me.

*looks at chair*
image

....Because it's not. It's a chair.

...What I'm trying to say is that the two things aren't really comparable.

I didnt know limited installed was a thing

thats essentially rendering a product you PAID for useless after a certain amount of time

Are they even still having install limits like they used to when Spore etc. were around?

Anyways, the next step should be a folding chair that remembers your butt and collapses if someone else tries to sit on it. Of course it would be always online (collapse if disconnect), always uploading the time, your weight, your body temperature etc. (they sell those to marketing firms... prepare for fitness drink comercials etc.) to make sure nobody sits on it unless they buy a 10€ pass.
If you want to use it without internet, you get a small RFID implanted into your butt cheek (much like dogs are marked in their neck).

Twilight_guy:
...It's a fun little absurdity but by no means anywhere near a valid comparison. Still, it's an interesting idea.

I disagree. I think the primary issue here is first sale. When I pay money for this product, do I own it wholly, or is the use of this product dependent upon a second or third party fulfilling an obligation? When I buy a cd, I can play it as many times as I want, I can loan it to a friend, etc, etc. I can do that because the product is mine.

The difference here is that with DRM, you can't/don't fully own the product you've paid for. In essence, you are leasing this product from the creator for a predetermined period of use.

So, it seems to me that with DRM, developers are attempting to redefine the term of ownership, and I think this video does a great job of highlighting this phenomenon.

Vault101:
I didnt know limited installed was a thing

thats essentially rendering a product you PAID for useless after a certain amount of time

Well, with SimCity (And Diablo 3 before the announcment of Console offline version) its the same thing, EA servers have a history of lasting right around 5 years before they kill them, and with the majority of Sim Cities computing done server side, as soon as its turned off you wont have the product you paid for anymore.

Twilight_guy:

It's a fun little absurdity but by no means anywhere near a valid comparison. Still, it's an interesting idea.

Seems like a valid comparison to me. You get X product for Y time

So

Desert Punk:
[quote="Vault101" post="7.402919.16636381"]
Seems like a valid comparison to me. You get X product for Y time

So essentially you don't buy a game, you rent it for an amount of time that the producer sees fit and can also revoke.

Twilight_guy:
Compare real life to piracy: YOU CAN'T DO THAT ITS DIGITAL MEDIA AND COMPLETELY DIFFERENT, YOUR ARGUMENT IS INVALID!
Compare DRM to real life: Yeah that's right, this totally supports my ideas and shows how right I am!

It's a fun little absurdity but by no means anywhere near a valid comparison. Still, it's an interesting idea.

Primarily because everyone brings up "theft" when talking about piracy which is their major flaw, since theft and copyright infringement are 2 different things and you cant accurately have a physical representation of copyright infringement.

However you CAN have an accurate physical representation of DRM. Kind of this, but instead of after X times you sit down, imagine theres someone with their finger on the "break button" and they press it after a few years when they feel like it.

It'd be more comparable if it used up a 'use' per every different person and every person is then allowed to keep sitting on it without using up another use. The sitee can then unregister their ability to sit, and give it to another potential person-who-likes-to-sit-on-a-hard-wooden-chair (that's how securom works with computers).

It's not just a person sitting on it 8 times. I don't remember any game to stop working due to even the worst DRM after a few times of playing it.

But i suppose that's slightly less evil and wouldn't be as sensationalist. Also, the chair wouldn't fall apart, it would just taze the 9th person who sits on it unless one of the previous 8 gave up their registration.

Actually, that would be fun, can we do a more accurate DRM chair please, with the creators of this one as the 9th person or above? DRM is annoying, but people who try to be clever about anologies like this and miss the point in pursuit of sensationalism annoy me, especially when they're probably annoyingly smug about it (performance art, they have to be smug, that's their baseline emotion).

P.S. The always online chair tazes you if your wifi goes down.

My relationships are like DRM and modern gaming. They expect me to "always be on", they quickly expect me to prove to THEM that I'm the real deal, I end up punching in a bunch of numbers to pay for our dates and entertainment, they're only fun for a limited amount of times before becoming useless, and then they try spying on me. Then when I try to tell them why I'm hooking up with someone else, someone who treats me with respect, they say it was my fault and try and ban me from their lives.

Huh.

its a pretty spot on usage comparison but ill never forgive you for making me watch 2 minutes of performance art

just say no to performance art people!
nothing good ever comes from it and it just encourages art students

Desert Punk:

Well, with SimCity (And Diablo 3 before the announcment of Console offline version) its the same thing, EA servers have a history of lasting right around 5 years before they kill them, and with the majority of Sim Cities computing done server side, as soon as its turned off you wont have the product you paid for anymore.

I know that, its just limited installs seems so much more....up front about the fact your game has a use by date

I also find it hilarious that consoles are getting a version with offline...showing that "playing it the real way" was bullshit

The thing I took away from this video is that people don't know how to sit comfortably. They all just ease their asses into the thing and just kind of... hover. You're supposed to plop down and relax damn it!

rofltehcat:
Are they even still having install limits like they used to when Spore etc. were around?

Most publishers have moved to making people register an account with Steam or some other distribution service in place of limited installs.

For example you cant play the PC version of Borderlands 2 online without signing up to Steam.

Has no-one stopped in their fervent anti DRM rants to think that this video is actually poor at describing the problems with DRM? There's a whole bunch of different people using that 1 chair. Translate that into a whole bunch of different people using that 1 game and you have a game getting banned because it's pirated. I do wish people would think more...

I dislike restrictive DRM as much as the next gamer, but I know a bad metaphor when I see one.

Twilight_guy:
Compare real life to piracy: YOU CAN'T DO THAT ITS DIGITAL MEDIA AND COMPLETELY DIFFERENT, YOUR ARGUMENT IS INVALID!
Compare DRM to real life: Yeah that's right, this totally supports my ideas and shows how right I am!

It's a fun little absurdity but by no means anywhere near a valid comparison. Still, it's an interesting idea.

It is amusing to see silly, disingenuous and strained analogies, however.

Only fools and suckers "begrudgingly accept" DRM. The correct course of action is to reject it outright.

That's kinda cute, but the chair really needs some additions:

- constant connection to the chair manufacturer
- EULA, which disallows you to lend the chair to anyone else
- a sensor which causes the chair to collapse immediately when someone else sits on it
- a system which causes ALL the chairs in your home to collapse if one of your chair breaks and you want a refund from the chair manufacturer

verindae:
a whole bunch of different people using that 1 chair. Translate that into a whole bunch of different people using that 1 game and you have a game getting banned because it's pirated. I do wish people would think more...

So basically, if more than one person uses a chair, it's chair piracy? Odd, I never really thought of that. Oh well.

I foresee a nightmarish, hellscape of a future wherein Ikea and other furniture retailers send demos of couches, chairs, etc to people homes. After a customer has enjoyed the demo, the piece they are trying out crumples into dust, waiting for the Hyper-Roomba to clean it up. Hopefully it'll last long enough for me to enjoy the latest episode of The Running Man!

---

I'd like to see them do something similar only instead of this kind of DRM they make a bed that is only in a position that allows you to lay in it if you're wearing a really stupid hat or, something. Something that can be loosely connected to always online DRM.

Sgt. Sykes:
So basically, if more than one person uses a chair, it's chair piracy? Odd, I never really thought of that. Oh well.

This puts me in mind of the ZP review of Ass Creed 3...Anybody wanna dress up as a pirate and rob a furniture show room with me now? We should be fine, Batman doesn't really exist in this version of Earth.

This isn't the same as DRM, the parallels only become clear past the point the analogy has no value. Also this is the same technology printers have been using for decades.

Still a fun idea though.

Gotta love how physical products and digital ones are "OMG COMPLETELY THE SAME" for the purposes of attacking anything the evil Companies like and "OMG COMPLETELY DIFFERENT" for the purposes of defending anything they don't.

Twilight_guy:
Compare real life to piracy: YOU CAN'T DO THAT ITS DIGITAL MEDIA AND COMPLETELY DIFFERENT, YOUR ARGUMENT IS INVALID!
Compare DRM to real life: Yeah that's right, this totally supports my ideas and shows how right I am!

It's a fun little absurdity but by no means anywhere near a valid comparison. Still, it's an interesting idea.

You've apparently never had a thief break into your home or somehow manage to be naive enough to believe that no thief has ever broken into a store to steal something.

What I'm getting at here is that DRM is intended to prevent pirates from stealing games like you would assume real world DRM is intended to prevent thieves from stealing a chair. And in both cases, the pirate/thief probably steals it anyway because they know they can get around the DRM and end up with a better product than those of us that paid for it.

Vault101:

Desert Punk:

Well, with SimCity (And Diablo 3 before the announcment of Console offline version) its the same thing, EA servers have a history of lasting right around 5 years before they kill them, and with the majority of Sim Cities computing done server side, as soon as its turned off you wont have the product you paid for anymore.

I know that, its just limited installs seems so much more....up front about the fact your game has a use by date

I also find it hilarious that consoles are getting a version with offline...showing that "playing it the real way" was bullshit

The install limit DRM was a thing that was kind of an experiment by, you guessed it, EA a few years back. I don't think many games ended up getting the install limit treatment but it was still a ridiculous stunt and made a lot of people angry. Especially since EA didn't exactly tell us that there was a 6x install limit on Spore and that failed install attempts counted. That the installer was buggy as hell didn't help their case.

Doom-Slayer:

Twilight_guy:
Compare real life to piracy: YOU CAN'T DO THAT ITS DIGITAL MEDIA AND COMPLETELY DIFFERENT, YOUR ARGUMENT IS INVALID!
Compare DRM to real life: Yeah that's right, this totally supports my ideas and shows how right I am!

It's a fun little absurdity but by no means anywhere near a valid comparison. Still, it's an interesting idea.

Primarily because everyone brings up "theft" when talking about piracy which is their major flaw, since theft and copyright infringement are 2 different things and you cant accurately have a physical representation of copyright infringement.

No. No, no, that's wrong. Copyright infringement and copyright theft are not mutually exclusive concepts.

VanQ:
Snip

If I remember correctly, Bioshock was the first major offender regarding install limits, and the internet was not pleased for a while. My disc copy of Mass Effect 1 doesn't work anymore because I've upgraded my motherboard twice since then. Re-installing your operating system also counted as an additional computer to your "concurrent installs" limit. I swore back then that somebody was actively trying to destroy the PC gaming market.

Twilight_guy:
Compare real life to piracy: YOU CAN'T DO THAT ITS DIGITAL MEDIA AND COMPLETELY DIFFERENT, YOUR ARGUMENT IS INVALID!
Compare DRM to real life: Yeah that's right, this totally supports my ideas and shows how right I am!

It's a fun little absurdity but by no means anywhere near a valid comparison. Still, it's an interesting idea.

I actually agree, through obviously from the different side of things than you.

People who make forced comparisons between property and intellectual property, are ALWAYS missing the point, whether they are talking about the artist's "property" being stolen like a chair, or my bought "property" being limited like this chair. (even though the two are the same thing, the author, the consumer, the public, and the publisher, all "own" different aspects of an IP at the same time).

mokes310:

I disagree. I think the primary issue here is first sale. When I pay money for this product, do I own it wholly, or is the use of this product dependent upon a second or third party fulfilling an obligation? When I buy a cd, I can play it as many times as I want, I can loan it to a friend, etc, etc. I can do that because the product is mine.

Even without DRM, you fundamentally can't "own" copyrighted content in the same way as physical property. See above.

If you buy a CD, you can't start playing it as BGM in your bar. If you buy a movie DVD, you can't put it into your private TV channel's DVD player and start broadcasting it like any of your other DVDs. If you buy a chair, you can make replicas of it, but you can't always replicate copyrighted data on a disc that you buy.

When you buy a CD, you can't possibly "own" the concept of the data that is written it, because obviously, it's still the seller's IP. You can possibly get a license that PARTIALLY tries to imitate physical property by granting infinite access, or you may only get stricter licenses, or more liberal ones that also allow for copying (like Creative Commons), but as soon as you bring the analogy as far as claiming that you truly "own" the IP in te same way as physical property, it will eventually fall apart.

CJ1145:
The thing I took away from this video is that people don't know how to sit comfortably. They all just ease their asses into the thing and just kind of... hover. You're supposed to plop down and relax damn it!

Well it's probably because if they sat properly in it the epoxy in the joints would weaken and collapse.

...You know like their argument.

I like what they are trying to do but media is not a chair. A more reasonable comparison is the chair exploding after being put in storage 8 times. I am not crazy about drm either but I don't see the analogy.
I think the video would have been much better if it was an arty short film about how every time we use a thing we slowly destroy it. Bang in a black haired woman smoking in a negligee, guzzling wine and a black and white filter and call it "l'morte du chaise" or something.

Regardless of whether the comparison is adequate or not, the video is tremendously relaxing.

This can only be a success if big companies with a big hardon for DRM would watch this and realize that DRM is a stupid idea. Except they've got bank notes stuffed in their ears and eyesockets, so they're not going to bother taking this seriously.

Let's not give up, gentlemen.

What's wrong with their pants? Are they also riddled with DRM and will get smaller every time they wear them?

Some products are already built to break. In that sense DRM becomes the lesser of two evils, because at least most games (Activation-limit DRM can burn in silicon hell) don't inevitably cease to function after so long.

Now pray to God nobody tells Ikea. Just imagine:

"...in a recent press announcement from Ikea, the Swedish firm had confirmed that it is partnering with EA to create a new line of computer-connected desk and chairs. The new line of product is not only 200% cheaper than current product lines, but also automatically collapses if you don't keep the furniture online and purchase a copy of FIFA and/or Simcity every year. It will also collapse every 3 year anyway if you don't renew the license..."

 Pages 1 2 3 NEXT

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Register for a free account here