ESA Rolls Out New Awareness Campaign

ESA Rolls Out New Awareness Campaign

image

The Entertainment Software Association is launching a new effort to increase the awareness of videogame ratings among parents.

The ESRB has been found time and again to be the most effective media content rating system in North America, with a greater rate of adherence than those for movies, videos, television and music. And ESRB President Patricia Vance said in February that it's possible that videogame rating awareness has maxed out at around 85 percent of parents with kids, 70 percent of whom say they use it all or most of the time. Yet whenever the topic of videogames comes up, governments and "think of the children" groups waste no time reminding the game industry of its responsibility to ensure that parents have all the tools and information they need to make informed choices about what their children can play.

So even though it may have already redlined the awareness engine, the ESA is rolling out another public education campaign to let parents know about videogame ratings and urge them to please make use of them. The campaign will include a new round of PSAs which will be promoted through "the unique interconnectivity and reach of the video game industry's platforms," partnerships with state and government officials to raise awareness of rating and parental control information and coordinating with retailers to provide game rating information for both in-store and online use.

"Our industry has a long-standing, high-quality track record of empowering parents," said Entertainment Software Association CEO Michael Gallagher, who also took the opportunity to once again remind everyone that the ESRB has the "strongest self-regulatory code" on the market. "Today we will build on that success."

The new ESA campaign comes not too far behind the release of the U.S. government's "Gun Violence Prevention Task Force" report, which among other things called upon the game industry to "give parents the tools to make appropriate choices about what their children watch and play." So while the ESRB may not realistically be able to push ratings awareness and usage up by a meaningful amount, it is most definitely in its best interests to try.

Permalink

Here's an idea: How about we fine the parents who let their underage kids play these games?
You can be DAMN sure they'd read the back of the box then.

I think that would violate the first amendment, which is why attempts to have legally enforceable ratings (such as exist in the UK and much of the rest of the world) in both film and games have floundered

DVS BSTrD:
Here's an idea: How about we fine the parents who let their underage kids play these games?
You can be DAMN sure they'd read the back of the box then.

The legal fees alone for all those court dates would bankrupt any city from a logical standpoint. Also people don't claim responsibility these days.

I approve of ESRB. I like the thought of an advisory much more than a government backed authourity being able to decide when people get to watch things.

Especially with the goddamn BBFC still being a bunch of arseholes. "18" for the walking dead? Really? Fucking Really?

DVS BSTrD:
Here's an idea: How about we fine the parents who let their underage kids play these games?
You can be DAMN sure they'd read the back of the box then.

That's a terrible idea XD

Who is going to fine them? The government? They have no power to do so, and I'd prefer to keep it that way. New York already thinks its people are too stupid to take care of themselves with their attempted ban on 16oz sodas and whatnot.

I get annoyed with any agency that has decided that it should police other people's content. Comics Code anyone? The Film Classification system that is so up its own arse it can only approve things that fit its own personal taste? Double standard between violence, language and sex all over the place?

As has been said before, it is the parents responsibility, not the governments, and not anyone's pet set of prudish knee-jerk 'I'm offended by this' sensibilities either.

Just describe content, then get out of the way.

Correction: The campaign is about ESRB ratings but it's actually the ESA that's running it. The post has been updated accordingly.

I think it's important to continually remind us the guidelines put in place. So even if the most lazy and irresponsible parents don't suddenly convert, those that will sometimes look for more information will do so more frequently.

Captcha is calling me a pea brain for not knowing the previous question :(

CardinalPiggles:
I think it's important to continually remind us the guidelines put in place. So even if the most lazy and irresponsible parents don't suddenly convert, those that will sometimes look for more information will do so more frequently.

Also, is the rating really on the back in the states? Maybe it should be on the front, because some people are that lazy. And again, if they see a big M on the front they may be reminded of it's importance.

Captcha is calling me a pea brain for not knowing the previous question :(

Actually, the rating itself is on the front, but the back also has the rating, and goes into detail about how the game got the rating it did.

*Reads Title*
Wait... why is the European Space Agency getting involved in Video Game ratings?

*Reads Article*

Oh, that ESA...

OT:
Well further awareness can only be a good thing. However, I'm not sure it'll help against people who are just using 'underage gamers' as a stock-complaint...

Doclector:
I approve of ESRB. I like the thought of an advisory much more than a government backed authourity being able to decide when people get to watch things.

Especially with the goddamn BBFC still being a bunch of arseholes. "18" for the walking dead? Really? Fucking Really?

government backed systems like Australia don't control what people can watch. They just require the store to follow the ratings established. They don't control who watches the movie/game etc once it leaves the store.

Oh, great, more people trying to classify people by age and telling them what they can and cannot watch.

 

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Register for a free account here