Ouya Promises Console Will Be Fixed Before June 4 Launch

 Pages PREV 1 2
 

I feel like I could say the same thing about mainstream consoles, but one thing we keep forgetting when we say these things is that not everyone is computer savvy. Some people are, at least to us, disturbingly unsavvy. A console is a very easy way for those people to pick up games.

On top of that, the Ouya has built in controller support for all it's games. It even comes with a controller, which no smart phones do. All games have a forced demo, so people aren't forced to buy games blindly. There are also no licensing issues, and every console, like every android phone, is an SDK.

While just looking at specs this isn't super impressive, it opens the door for indie developers to code for people who aren't tech savvy on their computers.

Echoing what others said, the Ouya doesn't offer anything that an Android Smartphone with an hdmi out port doesn't already offer. In fact, the smartphone is actually better as you can play on your TV or play on the go. Honestly I can't understand why anyone would want an Ouya.

The Apple BOOM:
I feel like I could say the same thing about mainstream consoles, but one thing we keep forgetting when we say these things is that not everyone is computer savvy. Some people are, at least to us, disturbingly unsavvy. A console is a very easy way for those people to pick up games.

On top of that, the Ouya has built in controller support for all it's games. It even comes with a controller, which no smart phones do. All games have a forced demo, so people aren't forced to buy games blindly. There are also no licensing issues, and every console, like every android phone, is an SDK.

While just looking at specs this isn't super impressive, it opens the door for indie developers to code for people who aren't tech savvy on their computers.

This guy nailed it.

The games are free to play or try.
The API is open.
The Price point is low.
Not everyone can afford a major console, not all developers can afford to write for them.
Consoles are trying to be everything now.

Major developers are lining up to write for it, they see something beyond the AAA market.

If you have a PC, an XBox and/or a Playstation - perhaps the Ouya is not for you.. But I know quite a few families who would love a device where the kids could play the games for free and not have to worry about damaging disks.

ascorbius:

This guy nailed it.

The games are free to play or try.
The API is open.
The Price point is low.

Andriod Phones have all of these qualities. Jailbroken iPhones too.

Not everyone can afford a major console, not all developers can afford to write for them.
Consoles are trying to be everything now.

So are phones. And they are doing a decent job of it. Maybe not everyone cal afford a major console but damn near everyone has a smartphone that is more powerful or on par with the Ouya. Pretty much everyone has a PC as well. Taking consoles out of the equation the Ouya is still not as attractive as many devices people have in their house by pretty much default, or a pocket sized device.

Major developers are lining up to write for it, they see something beyond the AAA market.

Major developers are lining up to put out another port of the games they put out on mobile phones. Just because a major dev is working on it doesn't mean that they're going to take it for anything more than profit.

If you have a PC, an XBox and/or a Playstation - perhaps the Ouya is not for you.. But I know quite a few families who would love a device where the kids could play the games for free and not have to worry about damaging disks.

Yeah, and those kids probably have smartphones, so the Ouya's not for them either. It may seem like I'm being a major asshole, but the Ouya is a device marketed to groups of people who don't really exist in large numbers. Gamers who are willing to pay $99 for a machine that plays games that compete with games on Newgrounds, people without a PC as well as a Phone who want to game,etc. This thing isn't the most marketable or capable thing on the planet and that's why it will fail. It can't compete with phones for crying out loud simply because of portability. Like for crying out loud there are iPhone games that beat out 3DS games and compete with Vita games. If the Ouya can't do that what's the point? The Samsung Galaxy is more powerful and is cheaper with a contract. The Ouya's capabilities limited it to play casual games or well done indie games, and the well done indie games will wind up being sold on Steam/Desura/Gamersgate, etc. And the casual gaming market has shown itself to not be the best place for lasting customers. Examples include the Wii's lack of core 3rd party support due to Nintendo marketing to casuals specifically, the fall of Zynga and companies like it, the fact that Rovio has done nothing but milk Angry Birds and make more money off of stuffed animals than gaming of any sort.

The Ouya isn't going to be able to compete with anything that can be known as an electronic device that can be use to entertain.

DarklordKyo:
It rhymes with booyah.

I figured as much. I want to say that the name alone will drive consumers away, but this is the same market that ate up something called a "Wii".

AzrealMaximillion:
[quote="ascorbius" post="7.405356.16833960"]
<[snip]>
Yeah, and those kids probably have smartphones, so the Ouya's not for them either. It may seem like I'm being a major asshole, but the Ouya is a device marketed to groups of people who don't really exist in large numbers. Gamers who are willing to pay $99 for a machine that plays games that compete with games on Newgrounds, people without a PC as well as a Phone who want to game,etc. This thing isn't the most marketable or capable thing on the planet and that's why it will fail. It can't compete with phones for crying out loud simply because of portability. Like for crying out loud there are iPhone games that beat out 3DS games and compete with Vita games. If the Ouya can't do that what's the point? The Samsung Galaxy is more powerful and is cheaper with a contract. The Ouya's capabilities limited it to play casual games or well done indie games, and the well done indie games will wind up being sold on Steam/Desura/Gamersgate, etc. And the casual gaming market has shown itself to not be the best place for lasting customers. Examples include the Wii's lack of core 3rd party support due to Nintendo marketing to casuals specifically, the fall of Zynga and companies like it, the fact that Rovio has done nothing but milk Angry Birds and make more money off of stuffed animals than gaming of any sort.

The Ouya isn't going to be able to compete with anything that can be known as an electronic device that can be use to entertain.

Well, time will tell on whether the Ouya was a good idea or not, and whether the hate in this thread is justified.
There does seem to be an air of righteous indignation over a device whose commenters either know little about or have no intention of buying anyway - but damn if they don't want anyone else to buy one either...

Let's sort the phone argument out.

Without a contract, a Samsung Galaxy S3 costs somewhere in the region of 500 new.
And to be completely fair, you should be comparing without a contract as the Ouya is not a phone and no-one buys a phone just for games. Either that or work out what the finance options are on an Ouya over 2 years (4 a month) - because that's the minimum contract on a Samsung S3 and with Orange in the UK, with a package giving 500mb per month data usage, you're looking at spending 744 over 2 years (in fact most of the plans come to that amount when you add the initial payment and monthly fees) - Sure, you get a great phone with a ton of features beyond gaming and unlimited phone service, but still.. to compare the stats alone is unfair.

Add to that the 30 that you'll need to get a bluetooth controller, then plug your S3 cable into a HDMI port on your TV and congratulate yourself for spending at least 530 on a games console made from a phone ( or 770 over 2 years )- that will take advantage of a small selection of the games you have installed.

It's a ridiculous comparison.

With a phone your gaming sessions have to be short or else the battery will die. Either that or you need to charge it regularly.
You can't play multi-player with several controllers on a phone.
Games demanding more power drain the battery faster.
Also, as nice as the S3 screen is - and it is VERY nice - it's not a TV.
It's good for what it does, providing gaming sessions on the go, while you're going to school/work or taking a break, waiting for a plane, answering nature..
They've never been seen as serious games which you would invest real time in, more like fast food when you're hungry and out.

Controls on a phone are woefully limited.
Touchscreen controls are never going to replace a good controller set-up and given that mobile games are pretty much designed solely for the touchscreen, you'll have to ask the developers very nicely if they'll support a controller.

Also given that the Ouya does not use the Google Play store, you're not going to be downloading ANY phone games.

So this comparison of Apples and Oranges needs to stop really.
They are priced differently, they are used differently and controlled differently. They are utterly different.

One thing the Ouya does bring to the table that has not really been covered in these little chats is platform stability.

You see, Android is quite fragmented. Different CPU types, processor speeds, amounts of memory, resolutions, implementations of hardware, versions of Android, flavours of bespoke Android.. it's quite a minefield. You cannot totally guarantee that a game which works on one phone will work on another, so you have to test on a very broad spectrum of phones. The emulator isn't enough and it's something the developers have to stay on top of if they want to remain successful. It's a pain for Android developers. ( I develop for Android )

With the Ouya, you just need to get it working properly on the console and you can be pretty reasonably sure it'll work on all of them - cutting your QA time right down.

I do recall that the Wii received a similar hostile reaction on these very pages when it was first released.
It's detractors stated categorically:
No-one would buy it, it was under-powered, Standard Def. Who could possibly want one?
Didn't stop it from doing incredibly well, becoming the most popular console of the generation for a while.
The WiiU is now trying to muscle into the market of the larger players.

I think this leaves quite the large market for a console which isn't trying to take anything away from the XBox and Playstation fans. It's actually going after the Wii.

It should be a success given that one of the biggest factors determining a console's success is the games available to it and that the barrier for entry for the Ouya is so low, the games should be forthcoming and varied.

And it does strike me as very odd that given the draconian measures being thrown around by the current Kings of the consoles that gamers would choose to discard a console which allows them to play games on their TV while avoiding those measures.

Choice = Bad?

Perhaps EA's indoctrination of gamer culture is complete.

(Also: Zynga never had a good idea in their life, they just copied or purchased other people's and Rovio is allowed to milk the most successful game franchise in recent times until the cow dries up. None of these factors have any bearing on the Ouya's potential success )

Quick correction. The Ouya will allow you to use the google play store alongside the Ouya store.

Edit: I'm looking at the final controller design. Did they drop the touch pad?

 Pages PREV 1 2

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Register for a free account here