Nintendo Says 3DS Beats App Store With "Quality"

Nintendo Says 3DS Beats App Store With "Quality"

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Nintendo believes gamers want better experiences over a massive library of games.

It used to be that videogame systems competed with other game systems and that was it. Nowadays, most every device imaginable offer some sort of gaming functionality, right down to public urinals. The greatest exemplar of the expanded gaming market is the continued growth of the mobile games, rooted largely in smartphones. Once simple tools for communication, phones and mobile devices have grown into multifaceted multimedia experiences that some would say are beginning to eclipse traditional consoles. Others would frame things differently. Discussing the competition between the 3DS and iPhone App Store recently, Nintendo representatives described it as being a battle between "quantity and quality."

"The website 148apps.biz recently calculated that there are currently 139,000 different games actively available on the [Apple] app store," said Scott Moffit, a sales VP speaking at Nintendo showcase. "Obviously there are good games available for mobile platforms, but the Nintendo 3DS has a record of quality that's hard to challenge." According to Moffit, the 3DS has close to fifty games with Metacritic scores of 75 or higher, another eleven with a score of at least 85, and 5 ranking above 90. There is contention as to the actual value of such rankings, with even Metacritic admitting good scores are not always an indicator of fiscal success. That said, Moffit's point is clear: whatever advantage the App Store has in the amount of content, it can't compare in terms of gaming excellence.

Granted, there are some excellent 3DS games that are unique to the handheld. Likewise, fewer junk games cluttering its library could make it easier for Nintendo to highlight its best exclusive titles. That said, the iPhone, and other mobile devices for that matter, are far from impoverished when it comes to good games. Prominent franchises like Final Fantasy, Grand Theft Auto, Dead Space and more can all be found in the App Store and personally, while I might buy a 3DS for games like Fire Emblem: Awakening, I'm not representative of the typical consumer. Many, looking at the iPhone they already have might very well think, "This is good enough."

Source: Kotaku

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So the Nintendo eShop has some great games on it compared to the App Store...

But how many people own an ipad/phone/pod compared to a 3DS?

Well, as for buying a 3ds for Awakening goes, it's pretty standard. 3DS sales in the UK went up 50% last week (awakening was released here on Friday) and the game itself was 3rd in the sales charts for the same week (after injustice and infinite.)

But yeah, the quality games on handhelds (both of them mind you) are far better than the app store offerings in my opinion. I'm all for touch controls where they're appropriate but a lack of buttons doesn't lend itself to ports which almost all of the best games on the app store are.

That said, Nintendo really need to step up their digital game, which they seem to finally have understood if recent statements are anything to go by. Promotions like this and the news that 30% of FE:A sales in NA were digital make me hopeful for the 3ds.

And that's definitely a failing of mobile developers. Everyone just wants to either make quick cash, or get lucky and make the next Angry Birds by making simple games with no substance. There are no games that rival real handheld developed games because no one thinks of those kinds of experiences with tablets or smartphones. And that's a real shame.

I love my android tablet, but it sure would be nice if there were games on it that felt like the developers were actually trying. I would love to see a game like Fire Emblem or Zelda on it.

Why, yes, Nintendo, the App Store does have a lot of shitty games.

That comes with the territory when you actually make your platform relatively indie friendly.

Which is a GOOD thing.

JediMB:
Why, yes, Nintendo, the App Store does have a lot of shitty games.

That comes with the territory when you actually make your platform relatively indie friendly.

Which is a GOOD thing.

Nintendo is still with a mentality that curation is the most important of important. It is what made Nintendo save the industry when Atari crashed it.

The problem is that curation only helps so much when you only have so many games to begin with.

I would agree one thing about the 3DS, aside from the eShop not having much to offer, I much prefer the culture and the titles available on the 3DS to Google Play. I can't get Pokemon or Tales of the Abyss on Google Play or iTunes. Not that I would deal with iTunes' customer unfriendly policies.

I'm personally with Nintendo on this one. But there is a limit to curation. What I'm tired of is owning so many devices. I wish I could just buy one video game platform, sign into a good service, and buy and download every game I've ever wanted to play. I love Nintendo's culture of good products and curation. But I still feel a bit limited.

I want good games and a massive library. I want to use an Operating System on my devices that lets me do whatever I want. A good OS should be open and customizable. Something as personal as Windows is good, and something as open as Linux is even better. And I'm tired of all these systems being these little pockets of games when there are hundreds of thousands of games out there. Can't I just play my games on a few devices instead of hundreds of them?

Why must I play Fire Emblem, Tales of Xillia, browse Firefox, and operate Sony Vegas all on completely different devices? When I was a little kid, it wasn't such a big deal. In 2013 it feels like I'm drowning in arbitrary hardware that one has to own for exclusive software because companies say so.

Yes Nintendo, we know you like to put games through a certification process - You've been doing that since 1985, and it did save the industry once by stemming the tide of clones from flooding the console.

Of course, that same "certification process" didn't save the Wii from being buried in shovelware, did it?

I'm still curious as to why Nintendo hasn't said anything about bringing Earthbound to the 3DS for download.

Temple Run is more fun than any game Nintendo have made in years.

/thread

EstrogenicMuscle:

The problem is that curation only helps so much when you only have so many games to begin with.

Indeed, the eShop/3DS just doesn't have the quantity to reach that point. Additionally, if they're talking quality, there was a LOT of junk the last time I was on the eShop. They don't seem to be achieving much through curation.

Nintendo definitely has some console-selling games, But I doubt they're selling on that much else.

Dr.Awkward:

Of course, that same "certification process" didn't save the Wii from being buried in shovelware, did it?

This is not to say Nintendo is off the hook on it, but the blame also rests with other big publishers who saw Nintendo's success with the Wii and casual games as "hey, we can make tons of money if we make crappy games for idiots too!" Instead of realizing that Nintendo's casual games were carefully crafted, good games at their core regardless of what market they went for, they put their D-list design teams on a shoe-string budget to pump out crap for an easy cash in.

Nintendo didn't have much of a choice there, as the big publishers weren't exactly companies they could say "no" too and expect to survive.

Sad, the whole Wii experience. I feel like there was a lot of missed opportunities there, both with Nintendo and publishers that ignored it until too late, and then only to cash-in half-assedly. Still had some amazing Nintendo titles, but overall it was a lowpoint for Nintendo home consoles, as I see it.

EstrogenicMuscle:
What I'm tired of is owning so many devices. I wish I could just buy one video game platform, sign into a good service, and buy and download every game I've ever wanted to play. I love Nintendo's culture of good products and curation. But I still feel a bit limited.

I'm definitely with you on this one. I wish Nintendo or Sony would just have the guts to create a fully-fledged handheld/phone hybrid. Sony's attempt with the Xperia Play was half-hearted at best and never went anywhere. Preferably Android-based, and maybe with a dual-OS setup that makes it possible to just shut off most of the smartphone functions when you want all resources dedicated to a game.

And on the console side of things, I wouldn't be opposed to a partnership between Nintendo and Microsoft. Microsoft know the western market, whilst Nintendo have it easier in Japan. Microsoft excel at the practical stuff like online functions, and Nintendo know how to think outside the box. (I'd rather not have to pay for basic online services, though, so Xbox Live would have to be reworked.)

Dr.Awkward:
Yes Nintendo, we know you like to put games through a certification process - You've been doing that since 1985, and it did save the industry once by stemming the tide of clones from flooding the console.

Of course, that same "certification process" didn't save the Wii from being buried in shovelware, did it?

So instead of clones they've just been upgrading/repeating the same games for 30 years.

I feel that nintendo is being quite disrespectful to the people who actually make quality games on the iphone. I can just browse mine as proof with games like Adventure bar story, Across Age, Plague Inc, Mage Gauntlet and Dungeon village and MANY others. I would rather that gamers themselves go through our own approval process where the good games remain at the top of the lists and the bad fall way to the bottom. I don't need some corporation telling me what I can and cannot play.

To simply label everything on a platform as trash is getting into the fanboy mentality. What's on the 3ds from indie developers? gunman clive? I'll take both, but I will primarily use my iphone as it has MORE quality games as to nintendo with it's very few.

JediMB:
I'm definitely with you on this one. I wish Nintendo or Sony would just have the guts to create a fully-fledged handheld/phone hybrid. Sony's attempt with the Xperia Play was half-hearted at best and never went anywhere. Preferably Android-based, and maybe with a dual-OS setup that makes it possible to just shut off most of the smartphone functions when you want all resources dedicated to a game.

Android would definitely be the best choice in my mind. But I'm biases in favor of Android because I don't like the business practices of Apple.

If it did happen, that would be great because it would help for Android/Google to further challenge Apple's market dominance. What better way to take down Apple than to have multiple companies join in to tag team them?

JediMB:
And on the console side of things, I wouldn't be opposed to a partnership between Nintendo and Microsoft. Microsoft know the western market, whilst Nintendo have it easier in Japan. Microsoft excel at the practical stuff like online functions, and Nintendo know how to think outside the box. (I'd rather not have to pay for basic online services, though, so Xbox Live would have to be reworked.)

Well, it would sure be good for both groups in many ways.

Microsoft consoles would finally have a foothold in Japan. And Nintendo would grab a lot more of the Western "hardcore" market.

Now that I think of it, they're both the companies who have the "Mii" thing going. They could just fuse the two together and have a Mii 3.5.

Your suggestion has my approval.

The only games installed on my phone are from the android humble bundle because I know those ones are good. Trying to sort out good games from the mountain of excrement that is the app store wasn't worth more than one attempt.

VoidWanderer:
So the Nintendo eShop has some great games on it compared to the App Store...

But how many people own an ipad/phone/pod compared to a 3DS?

The better question is what percentage of the iPad/Phone/Whatever owner buy apps on the store? Because how small the percentage on the 3DS may be, people who own a 3DS buy DS and 3DS games in stores aside from 3DS estore and the Virtual console titles.

I for one have yet to buy an app for my mobile phone. I already spend 15€ on the 3DS eStore (Pokemon Dream thingie and 3 Virtual Console games [Gargoyles, Donkey Kong Super Mario and Wario Land]). Because there I pretty much know what I get.

I honestly spend more time gaming on my phone than on my 3DS. Games like Sonic CD,and Super Hexagon are all far better than the vast majority of the 3DS library.

Nintendo, you only get to pull the quality over quantity card when you have the very best games. Having more "pretty good" games and fewer bad games simply isn't enough, when your best can't compare (at least on this console). When Animal Crossing, Zelda, Mario & Luigi Dream Team, and Yoshi's Island come out, then you can say things like this. When the best you have to offer are the too-short SM3DL, the too-bland NSMB2, and the too-niche Fire Emblem, you're not in a good place to be criticizing the quality of your competitors' offerings.

P.S. Thanks

Covarr:
I honestly spend more time gaming on my phone than on my 3DS. Games like Sonic CD,and Super Hexagon are all far better than the vast majority of the 3DS library.

Nintendo, you only get to pull the quality over quantity card when you have the very best games. Having more "pretty good" games and fewer bad games simply isn't enough, when your best can't compare (at least on this console). When Animal Crossing, Zelda, Mario & Luigi Dream Team, and Yoshi's Island come out, then you can say things like this. When the best you have to offer are the too-short SM3DL, the too-bland NSMB2, and the too-niche Fire Emblem, you're not in a good place to be criticizing the quality of your competitors' offerings.

P.S. Thanks

Only focusing on the first party games leaves out third party games like Monster Hunter Unlimited 3, Zero Escape, and Etrian Odyssey 4.

Covarr:
I honestly spend more time gaming on my phone than on my 3DS. Games like Sonic CD,and Super Hexagon are all far better than the vast majority of the 3DS library.

Sonic CD is pretty obnoxious to play on a phone, I've tried.

And to each their own. I really do enjoy the library of the Nintendo DS better. But then again, I really like my jRPGs. jRPGs don't work very well with a touchscreen, though it is arguably more fun than attempting Sonic CD.

That said, Moffit's point is clear: whatever advantage the App Store has in the amount of content, it can't compare in terms of gaming excellence.

That is a sentiment I completely agree with. You get what you pay for, and while it is cool to buy a $1-$4 appstore game and find original ideas in it that no AAA game developer would have or take risk on, the games themselves are pretty weak. Usually not by the fault of the developers, just the interface. The interface of the i-devices is the worst thing I've ever seen in my life, at least in relation to playing video games. Even the many variations of the DS kept button layouts. Whats worse is it completely crushes anything worthwhile an app developer could make by it's limitations. I really try to get into games like Infinity Blade, which is a fun distraction... but ultimately you are just swiping your finger left and right with 'muddy' response, at best. There is no real control happening, it gets more and more boring the more you play it and realize you are just watching a pretty video while occasionally giving the main character a "suggestion" on what they should be doing.
Don't get me started on games ported over, like pacman or megaman... WOW. If there was ever a good argument against iphone interface games, it's stuff like this. Amazing games with amazing experiences you are not allowed to enjoy because the interface just isn't there.

VoidWanderer:

But how many people own an ipad/phone/pod compared to a 3DS?

By that logic, how many people own a computer of some kind vs. an xbox? Does that mean the xbox is doing poorly?

ipad/phone/pod are multi-use devices that just happen to be able to play games to. When someone buys a game system, they don't choose an iphone over a vita or 3DS. They get the iPhone to make phone calls, take pictures, listen to music, etc. It just HAPPENS to play games. Computers just happen to play games to, but when Microsoft or Sony look at their respective console sales, they don't lump in computer sales to evaluate how well they did. You can't really compare your specialty item, with it's one very specific and intended use, up against something that will, objectively speaking, always have a wider market because it has multiple functions. And that wider market truly is a different market, because it is filled with quite a lot of people who had little to no interest in games when they were deciding on their purchase.

JediMB:
I'm definitely with you on this one. I wish Nintendo or Sony would just have the guts to create a fully-fledged handheld/phone hybrid. Sony's attempt with the Xperia Play was half-hearted at best and never went anywhere. Preferably Android-based, and maybe with a dual-OS setup that makes it possible to just shut off most of the smartphone functions when you want all resources dedicated to a game.

I own an Xperia Play, and I love it! That said, it is disappointing how much Sony didn't even put up a fight for it to succeed.
The price was steep on launch (hey, it is a Sony device...), but what really killed it was LACK OF SUPPORT (as always, I guess...).
Sony failed to put Playstation 1 classics for it, develop games for it, put any franchises on it.
It didn't even had a decent dedicated marketplace (Play store is good, but it is shared by too many devices). Why the Xperia Play didn't have access to the PSN, or even an simplified version of it defies logic.
It was the ONLY gaming-focused smartphone on the market. So much potential gone to waste!
Luckily, the modding community transformed it in the retrogamer's paradise that it is now. Yes, the hackers even gave it the PS1 support that Sony didn't delivered.

Nonetheless, even though Xperia Play had disappointing sales, I am under the impression that sony's smartphones sell poorly IN GENERAL. I wouldn't be surprised if the Xperia Play ended up being one of the bestselling Sony smartphones in a decade...

JediMB:
And on the console side of things, I wouldn't be opposed to a partnership between Nintendo and Microsoft. Microsoft know the western market, whilst Nintendo have it easier in Japan. Microsoft excel at the practical stuff like online functions, and Nintendo know how to think outside the box. (I'd rather not have to pay for basic online services, though, so Xbox Live would have to be reworked.)

This already exists! It is called a Sony Playstation.

Big_Boss_Mantis:
Nonetheless, even though Xperia Play had disappointing sales, I am under the impression that sony's smartphones sell poorly IN GENERAL. I wouldn't be surprised if the Xperia Play ended up being one of the bestselling Sony smartphones in a decade...

Well, I'm under the impression that Sony smartphones, as a consequence of the previous partnership with Ericsson, are very popular in Scandinavia... and the South American market.

I was dead set on getting an Xperia Play, but decided to wait for more PS1 titles to be released. I'm glad I waited, since it never actually happened.

Big_Boss_Mantis:
This already exists! It is called a Sony Playstation.

I'm just saying that on the business side of things a partnership between Microsoft and Nintendo could be highly lucrative for both parties.

In addition to getting Microsoft's third-party support and Nintendo's first-party titles on the same platform.

EDIT: And maybe Nintendo's traditional hardware quality to compensate for Microsoft's habit of putting together machines that spontaneously combust[1].

[1] slight exaggeration

JediMB:
Well, I'm under the impression that Sony smartphones, as a consequence of the previous partnership with Ericsson, are very popular in Scandinavia... and the South American market.

I was dead set on getting an Xperia Play, but decided to wait for more PS1 titles to be released. I'm glad I waited, since it never actually happened.

Well, I live in Brazil, and the ONLY Xperia I have seen in a final consumer's hand (of course we see them in stores) is my own. It is even hard to get accesories or replacement parts... I can tell you that, at least in Brazil, Sony Ericsson doesn't seem to hold an considerable market share...

Don't know about the rest of South America, though. But the cellphone market changed a lot recently... Did you get that impression after the smartphone market get into lockdown between Samsung and Apple (with an very occasional Nokia)?

JediMB:
I'm just saying that on the business side of things a partnership between Microsoft and Nintendo could be highly lucrative for both parties.

In addition to getting Microsoft's third-party support and Nintendo's first-party titles on the same platform.

EDIT: And maybe Nintendo's traditional hardware quality to compensate for Microsoft's habit of putting together machines that spontaneously combust

I don't think it is a bad idea on paper (Nintendo's stellar first party coupled with Microsoft's third party support).
I just don't think that it would end up like that.
See, Microsoft has (IMHO, hoping not to start a flame war) bad consumer policies. They like money, and they throw evil business practices if they think they can get away with it.
Paying for online. Ads on the dashboard. Harshly releasing an broken console. And even the whole "screw real games, this Kinect is A GOLD MINE!!" recent policy. I don't like them.

Sony is as stupid as it is incompetent. It makes bad decisions, it can't provide services that make up for the "premium price" they ask. But I try to compromise, because they like games and they do things for gamers.
Microsoft only likes "them monies". (again, from my angle. #dealwithit)

I think Nintendo, under Microsoft, wouldn't BE Nintendo. Super Mario Kinect would NOT be Super Mario Galaxy.
I may be wrong, but what I said is not unprecedented ... See what happened to RARE. (which is the closest thing we had on the hypothesis "Microsoft buying Nintendo")

And I disagree with "traditional Nintendo hardware quality".

Yes, my Game Cube had an horrible fall (ironically, it felt like a dice) and survived completely unscathed.
And my Wii also had his share of long road trips and still ticking.

But I can't stand how cheaply looking is Nintendo's recent hardware. Yes, I know, it IS cheap, it has to be cheap, and it just ends up showing.
But I couldn't stand to look at my (non XL) 3DS. Those asymetrical screens. That cheap plastic D-Pad. That poor quality touchscreen. That old design.
And that Wii U GamePad? So much plastic and so little of that ugly screen (in pictures it doesn't seem that bad). Doesn't look like an IPad or a Galaxy Note. It looks like a Etch-a-sketch.

It was acceptable in the early 2000's, but today, with smartphones and tablets dangling from trees, I find Nintendo's hardware painful to the sight.

Big_Boss_Mantis:
I think Nintendo, under Microsoft, wouldn't BE Nintendo. Super Mario Kinect would NOT be Super Mario Galaxy.
I may be wrong, but what I said is not unprecedented ... See what happened to RARE. (which is the closest thing we had on the hypothesis "Microsoft buying Nintendo")

(Fun trivia: Microsoft actually approached Nintendo about the possibility of them canceling the Gamecube to help design the Xbox instead.)

Anyway, I was suggesting an equal partnership; not an acquisition by Microsoft. An acquisition would be all kinds of horrible.

And RARE was already but a shell of its former self when Microsoft acquired the company, since a lot of people left both after they made GoldenEye and once Nintendo decided to sell. A lot of the GoldenEye people work at Crytek UK (formerly Free Radical Design) nowadays.

Big_Boss_Mantis:
And I disagree with "traditional Nintendo hardware quality".

Well, I was specifically referring to the robustness of their hardware. Hence the reference to Microsoft hardware's notorious failures. I own every Nintendo console from the NES to the Wii, plus a fair number of handhelds, and they're all still fully functional... with the N64 controllers' analogue sticks as the only exception.

I largely agree on that the Wii U controller feels cheap, and that there were more than a few unfortunate design choices made with the 3DS. Part of why I don't own either of them yet.

 

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