U.S. Appeals Court Smacks Around Wii Patent Troll

U.S. Appeals Court Smacks Around Wii Patent Troll

nintendo wii

The judge ruled that the case was filed against Nintendo for "financial gains" and not to support the adoption of the plaintiff's technology.

Ohio-based Motiva LLC filed suit against Nintendo all the way back in 2008, claiming that the Wii console infringed upon two of its patents for technology that tracks a user's position and body movement. In January 2012 the U.S. International Trade Commission ruled in favor of Nintendo, leading Motiva to file an appeal, which has now also gone Nintendo's way.

A panel of three judges on the Federal Circuit Court of Appeals in Washington DC affirmed the ITC decision, saying that the lawsuit did not qualify as sufficient cause to impose limits on imports of Nintendo's console, as Motiva had requested. The ruling also cast Motiva's motivations in a rather harsh light.

"Motiva was never close to launching a product incorporating the patented technology - nor did any partners show any interest in doing so, for years before or any time after the launch of the Wii," Judge Sharon Prost wrote. "Motiva's only remaining prototype was a product far from completion, and a multitude of development and testing steps remained prior to finalizing a product for completion."

"Motiva's litigation was targeted at financial gains, not at encouraging adoption of Motiva's patented technology. The inventors looked forward to financial gains through Motiva's litigation, not hopes of stimulating investment or partnerships with manufacturers. Motiva also never asked for a preliminary injunction from the district court, and it waited three years before seeking relief from the Commission - even though the importation of the Wii was allegedly the only obstacle to adoption of its patented technology in the market," the ruling states. "There is simply no reasonable likelihood that, after successful litigation against Nintendo, Motiva's patented technology would have been licensed by partners who would have incorporated it."

Nintendo said it was pleased with the decision, but a lawyer for Motiva called it "unfortunate" and indicated that the company will continue to pursue the matter. "We are confident that Motiva will be vindicated when its case is tried in district court," he said.

The ruling is available in full at www.cafc.uscourts.gov.

Source: Reuters

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I can't wait for Motiva to get slapped down AGAIN, like the whiny bitch that it is.

Anyone else want some popcorn to eat while we watch this troll struggle for importance?

So, the only reason Motiva most is because it sat on the patent? Looks like money won, and not justice.

Ronack:
So, the only reason Motiva most is because it sat on the patent? Looks like money won, and not justice.

If by "only reason" you mean "one of several listed in this very article", then yes.

But seriously, it quotes the judge giving several reasons all indicating that Motiva never had any real hope of producing such a product and therefore its patent was meaningless.

Good, I hope that this happens to more people claiming that they should get compensated for something that they one day drew on a drawing board and left. How the hell are you supposed to own an idea anyway?

There are seven billion people on the planet, I'm sure at eat ten thousand of them thought of it before you did.

Wait, did they really have legal monopolistic ownership granted over any technology that can track a users body position and movement? That's ridiculous.

Companies sue other companies for money.

WHO WOULD HAVE THOUGHT.

Serious, with this, what is the next news that comes out. That the on going suing battle between Samsung and Apple is just for their own gain of money?

Well you don't need a motion tracker to see Motiva's patent wasn't going anywhere.

DVS BSTrD:
Well you don't need a motion tracker to see Motiva's patent wasn't going anywhere.

BaZING

OT: More of this, please. Stupid broken patent system...

Ronack:
So, the only reason Motiva most is because it sat on the patent? Looks like money won, and not justice.

Sitting on a patent purely to blackmail others with it, also known as patent trolling, is about making money not justice. The courts saw through it, seriously there needs to be laws against that sort of crap. For one banning patents that are so generic, they need to cover a specific way of doing things only.

Sit DOWN! I wish all patent trolls got treated like this. If only more judges were able to see through the legal crap that companies or people like to throw around when it's clear they are simply trying to cheat the system and each other.

Didn't Nintendo make the first step anyway with the Power Glove? Alright, it handled like a cow on fire but it tracked the player's movement. Well only the hand but still.

RicoADF:

Ronack:
So, the only reason Motiva most is because it sat on the patent? Looks like money won, and not justice.

Sitting on a patent purely to blackmail others with it, also known as patent trolling, is about making money not justice. The courts saw through it, seriously there needs to be laws against that sort of crap. For one banning patents that are so generic, they need to cover a specific way of doing things only.

Shit, big companies do that all the time :lol: Yet, they would still probably win if they went after someone who's doing something with something they patented.

I kinda wish the judges were allowed to deliver literal bitchslaps with the metaphorical ones they throw around.

Seriously, this whole case was a giant joke and it's a sad state that people still try to pull it off. Maybe I should pull out my old exercise book which had a scribble of a cell phone that was also a media player and mini-computer at the same time. I DEMAND COMPENSATION FOR MY GENIUS FROM... WELL FROM EVERYONE!!!!

Its real nice to see a Patent Troll smacked down again. Is it me or do the judiciary seem to be getting wise to this kind of frivolous lawsuit recently?

Ronack:

RicoADF:

Ronack:
So, the only reason Motiva most is because it sat on the patent? Looks like money won, and not justice.

Sitting on a patent purely to blackmail others with it, also known as patent trolling, is about making money not justice. The courts saw through it, seriously there needs to be laws against that sort of crap. For one banning patents that are so generic, they need to cover a specific way of doing things only.

Shit, big companies do that all the time :lol: Yet, they would still probably win if they went after someone who's doing something with something they patented.

Hence why I said the US needs to update it's laws. Other countries aren't so bad, hence why Apple lost against Samsung in every other country it tried to stop the Galaxy Tab being sold.

 

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