Hollywood Tries to Censor Movie About Hollywood Censors

Hollywood Tries to Censor Movie About Hollywood Censors

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The irony is lost on the Hollywood studios, who have asked Google to take down links pointing to a Pirate Bay documentary based on the lives of the three founders of The Pirate Bay and their fight with Hollywood censors.

TPB-AFK is a documentary produced by Simon Klose that is based on the lives of the three founders of The Pirate Bay. It follows the multi-million dollar copyright infringement case the trio were involved in, and discuses the dangers of censorship on the internet. It was released in February this year completely free of charge, and millions of people have already watched it. But while the public response to the Pirate Bay produced documentary and its free model is overwhelmingly high, Ebenezer Scrooge, in the form of several Hollywood studios, is putting up its usual resistance. The irony of attempting to censor a movie about censorship is lost on Viacom, Paramount, Fox, and Lionsgate, who are trying to take down links pointing to the documentary.

Over the past few weeks, the four Hollywood studios have been actively trying to suppress the availability of TPB-AFK by requesting that Google remove links to the documentary from its search engine. As Google is one of, if not the biggest search engines in use, this is kind of a big deal. The takedown requests are carefully hidden in standard DMCA takedown notices for popular movies and TV shows, which the studios actually hold the rights for.

While it is possible that this is a tinfoil-hat conspiracy from Hollywood trying to silence TPB, another likely explanation is that this is just collateral damage from automated DMCA takedown request processes.

Most studios fully-automate their takedown requests, with programs that simply troll through all recently added Google links, pick up on infringing content, and file the request. It is entirely plausible that the Pirate Bay documentary was simply picked up by the automated system for whatever reason.

Torrent Freak warns that this doesn't make it any less of a problem, as it shows that the current DMCA system is ripe for abuse from Hollywood studios, as shareholders can take down whatever they want with almost no oversight and no incentive to improve the accuracy of their systems. It suggests a kind of "three strikes" systems for studios that abuse the system.

Source & Image: Torrent Freak

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See, the problem with that three strike system is that would take AWAY tyrannical and dictatorial powers from Hollywood. They probably won't let that slide and will throw money at all the right politicians.

Guy's neighbour hacks into guy's wi-fi and downloads a single episode of an obscure TV show that hasn't been re-run or put on DVD: guy gets sued $50,000.

Multi-billion company fires off DMCA notice to silence criticism: slap on the wrist.

This is why I hate copyright as a business model.

Ok I didn't have a clue that this movie existed until now.

Now I'm going to watch it jsut to see what the fuss is about.

Barbra Streisand Effect Ho!

Wait, I don't think I understand this... On what grounds are the listed studios trying to censor the film? If I'm reading the article right, the documentary was free of charge. I could understand them protecting their own IP, but this isn't their IP, is it? How is this even remotely legal?

Jandau:
Wait, I don't think I understand this... On what grounds are the listed studios trying to censor the film? If I'm reading the article right, the documentary was free of charge. I could understand them protecting their own IP, but this isn't their IP, is it? How is this even remotely legal?

It Isn't. Welcome to the world of copyright.

I will totally watch this thing now, though, because it sounds interesting.

Jandau:
Wait, I don't think I understand this... On what grounds are the listed studios trying to censor the film? If I'm reading the article right, the documentary was free of charge. I could understand them protecting their own IP, but this isn't their IP, is it? How is this even remotely legal?

Like the article said it is most likely an automated claim, if any of their IP names gets mentioned their software adds that link to the pile of blanket DMCA claims.

And this is not legal, not in the slightest, what is even more illegal is taking down content before the claims have gone through the legal system... this is just conglomerates muscling their way past any laws with money.

Ugh, thought we already went through why broad-range, autocratic and practically unaccountable policing of IP across the internet was retarded when they were pushing SOPA.

Now with this and Nintendo recently, we have the prospect of scattershot automated programs scanning the net and arbitrarily flagging everything they recognise without accountability for accuracy. Either wade through a series of challenges, and potential litigation to defend the item in question; or tough luck, because grayish and/or contentious potential IP infringement trumps the free flow of information and expression.

(goodbye rule 34?)

There really should be a penalty for false DCMA takedown requests. If I was google I would have a three strikes policy, if you make 3 false DCMA takedown requests, you would be bared from EVER making another DCMA takedown request.

Fucking DCMA is retarded anyway, the people that came up with it ought to be flogged.

Trying to rrmove links to a film they have no rights over? Stay classy Hollywood.

I'm gonna go download this film now. Just to prove to these Copyright Cunts© that the Streisand Effect is real.

I'll watch this now. I'm sticking it to the man!

The Plunk:
I'm gonna go download this film now. Just to prove to these Copyright Cunts© that the Streisand Effect is real.

Agreed. All they're doing is ensuring even more people will want to see it now.

Desert Punk:
There really should be a penalty for false DCMA takedown requests. If I was google I would have a three strikes policy, if you make 3 false DCMA takedown requests, you would be bared from EVER making another DCMA takedown request.

Fucking DCMA is retarded anyway, the people that came up with it ought to be flogged.

A company can actually be sued for false DMCA flags. Only issue is it turns into "Who runs out of money first" and that's a fight a regular person can't win.

Reminds me of SEGA and their false DMCA take downs of reviews/let's plays of Shining Force on Youtube. Even ones that only showed a guy sitting in front a camera and talking. I don't think those videos ever got restored and people got stuck with copyright strikes on their accounts. Seems that when a company decides to throw their weight around, even when it isn't lawful, there isn't much you can do about it.

Just watched the video on youtube. Pretty good stuff.

Desert Punk:
There really should be a penalty for false DCMA takedown requests. If I was google I would have a three strikes policy, if you make 3 false DCMA takedown requests, you would be bared from EVER making another DCMA takedown request.

Fucking DCMA is retarded anyway, the people that came up with it ought to be flogged.

I don't think it should be a permanent ban from making DMCA requests, it should be that requests are free (or with a small fee) but making three false claims grants you a hefty fine and any subsequent takedown requests have a large fee attached too. That way if they have to remove thousands of links, each with a $1000 fee for the request, they are out a million bucks. Repeat for every movie/show that gets put on the web and they could get bankrupted by fighting pirates if they aren't careful!

It will never happen though. Currently the legal hierarchy is thus:

<-- Hollywood studios
<-- The law
<-- You
<-- Crabpeople

I support the three strike system, if it means the person effected gets to strike the hollywood executive 3 times for every false takedown.

This also happened with Cory Doctorow's novel, Homeland (he released it under Creative Commons, open for personal digital copying), that was taken down by Fox, probably due to the automated systems mistaking it for Fox's TV show of the same title.

BlackStar42:

The Plunk:
I'm gonna go download this film now. Just to prove to these Copyright Cunts© that the Streisand Effect is real.

Agreed. All they're doing is ensuring even more people will want to see it now.

Especially considering that it would have just flown under peoples radar if they hadn't flagged it. I hadn't even heard of this movie before now.

Everything has an equal and opossit force, the harder you push the harder they will push back. Lets hope freedom won't be sacrificed for other men's greed. Anyway good doc nothing mindblowing but worth a watch.

Desert Punk:
There really should be a penalty for false DCMA takedown requests. If I was google I would have a three strikes policy, if you make 3 false DCMA takedown requests, you would be bared from EVER making another DCMA takedown request.

Fucking DCMA is retarded anyway, the people that came up with it ought to be flogged.

fuck that, make one false DMCA and you are fired from your job [in this case, since its probably automated, EVERYONE gets fired from their job in the company], banned from working in that industry for 30 years minimum, and lose all copyrights held by that company.

guarantee the studios would make a more accurate system than one that basically looks for anything with ThePirateBay in it.

Controversial Organization makes a (possibly controversial) movie about the overuse of destructive and abusive powers by Overbearing Corporations, against things they don't have any rights to change.

Overbearing Corporations use said destructive and abusive powers to try and take down this (possibly controversial) movie, which they don't have any rights to change.

Me: Movie might have a point. Time to go watch it.

Well, would you look at that? Shocking. /end sarcasm

CriticalMiss:

Desert Punk:
There really should be a penalty for false DCMA takedown requests. If I was google I would have a three strikes policy, if you make 3 false DCMA takedown requests, you would be bared from EVER making another DCMA takedown request.

Fucking DCMA is retarded anyway, the people that came up with it ought to be flogged.

It will never happen though. Currently the legal hierarchy is thus:

<-- Hollywood studios
<-- The law
<-- You
<-- Crabpeople

Actually, I think Crabpeople have a higher rank than the rest of us.

Yo dawg, i heard you liked censorship....

Well, chalk one more view up for the documentary. Didn't even know it existed until now. Thanks Hollywood.

And for companies that are very keen on their own copyright material, they sure don't have a lot of trouble in also trying to let other people take down their own copyrighted material that doesn't even belong to said company's.

Man, the Barbara Streisand effect is in full swing right now. I wonder if this irony will be lost on the execs as well?

Huh. I never heard of this until now.

Gotta love it when people create the very problem they are trying to fix.

CriticalMiss:

It will never happen though. Currently the legal hierarchy is thus:

<-- Hollywood studios
<-- The law
<-- You
<-- Crabpeople

SOPA proved that we can stand in the way of corporate interests.

It's now only a matter of making people more proactive, so they believe that they can also change things for the better, instead of just protesting against making it worse, and blindly accepting whatever already happens to be written in laws as corporations' unalienable right.

Entitled:

CriticalMiss:

It will never happen though. Currently the legal hierarchy is thus:

<-- Hollywood studios
<-- The law
<-- You
<-- Crabpeople

SOPA proved that we can stand in the way of corporate interests.

It's now only a matter of making people more proactive, so they believe that they can also change things for the better, instead of just protesting against making it worse, and blindly accepting whatever already happens to be written in laws as corporations' unalienable right.

SOPA was a fluke. One that would have a measurable negative effect on millions of peoples' lives. We're talking not about stopping a new law, but breaking a system that's thoroughly entrenched. It's the difference between stopping an anvil from falling on you and lifting an anvil that's been bolted to the ground and throwing it to the moon. One is vaguely conceivable. The other is strictly impossible.

DVS BSTrD:
I support the three strike system, if it means the person effected gets to strike the hollywood executive 3 times for every false takedown.

Only with if it is with this
image

OT
Yeah that sounds about right... This is right in line with the This movie has not been rated documentary that is on netflix. The jerks at the MPAA did not want that one out either but netflix said get bent.

Wait...what claim could these companies have to a movie that wasn't produced or funded by them in any way? Christ I hate this shit.

Khanht Cope:
Ugh, thought we already went through why broad-range, autocratic and practically unaccountable policing of IP across the internet was retarded when they were pushing SOPA.

Now with this and Nintendo recently, we have the prospect of scattershot automated programs scanning the net and arbitrarily flagging everything they recognise without accountability for accuracy. Either wade through a series of challenges, and potential litigation to defend the item in question; or tough luck, because grayish and/or contentious potential IP infringement trumps the free flow of information and expression.

(goodbye rule 34?)

But the software isn't flagging anything. They just cut to the chase and send out the automated letters threatening a legal shitstorm if the content isn't taken down immediately, regardless if it is actually breaking any laws or not, because fuck the middleman.

OT: The problem with DMCA takedowns is that it's completely run by retarded computer software which for some reason we've given legal power to. Sure, troll the internet for copyright infringements, we're okay with that; you have the right to be on the lookout for your content. But for the love of god, 'red flag' the sites and get an actual fucking person to look them up. I mean, anyone who uses Google or any search engine knows that it's not 100% accurate, especially taking dodgy wording into account.

Even though we all know piracy is a problem, it's the publishers problem. But they don't care, and since the law has declared that they have the right to make their problems our problems (DMCA takedowns, DRM, etc.), why the hell not?

Here's another irony I'm noticing: The attempt to censore makes us more aware and more likely to see it.

the documentary isnt really that good, but the whole censorship deal is kinda there.
also that movie kind of disspeared over a month ago, slow on reporting or a new scandal?

However since companies are the law now nothing can be done about it. as lnog as you have enough money you can do anything. all hail capitalism?

Genuinely interested in what Google are going to do ignore the takedown notices or enforce them....

Khanht Cope:
Ugh, thought we already went through why broad-range, autocratic and practically unaccountable policing of IP across the internet was retarded when they were pushing SOPA.

Now with this and Nintendo recently, we have the prospect of scattershot automated programs scanning the net and arbitrarily flagging everything they recognise without accountability for accuracy. Either wade through a series of challenges, and potential litigation to defend the item in question; or tough luck, because grayish and/or contentious potential IP infringement trumps the free flow of information and expression.

(goodbye rule 34?)

You can't stop rule 34.
It's more then just a site, more then a way of life.
It's an emergent property of the universe, it will always persist.

What's even the point of blocking Google results?

Anyone looking for a free movie about The Pirate Bay, if they can't find it on Google, should probably be able to figure out where they can...

 

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