Xbox One Fans Petition For The Return Of DRM

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Xbox One Fans Petition For The Return Of DRM

Xbox One

Microsoft's DRM backlash now has backlash of its own, as a group of Xbox One devotees have created an online petition to reverse Microsoft's new anti-DRM stance.

When the Xbox One first debuted at E3 2013, the majority reaction was one of stunned anger. The new games look good, and the new console seems as serviceable as Sony's next device, but then Microsoft got around to discussing the system's digital rights management scheme. Had Microsoft stuck with its initial plan, the Xbox One would refuse to play used games and players would need to maintain an active internet connection simply to play the titles they do own.

The outrage over this announcement was immediate and overwhelming. Within mere days of its Xbox One press conference, Microsoft decided to drop its DRM scheme and instead fall back on roughly the same anti-piracy measures seen in the Xbox 360. Hearing this, the Internet rejoiced (then immediately went back to hating everything save for pornography and pictures of adorable kittens).

All of this occurred weeks ago, and we'd assumed that it would be last anyone would hear of the Xbox One's draconian DRM. Turns out we were wrong. At this very moment an online petition is collecting signatures in an effort to convince Microsoft to return to its cast-off DRM scheme.

Why? We'll let the official description seen on the petition's Change.org page explain:

This was to be the future of entertainment. A new wave of gaming where you could buy games digitally, then trade, share or sell those digital licenses. Essentially, it was Steam for Xbox. But consumers were uninformed, and railed against it, and it was taken away because Sony took advantage of consumers uncertainty.

We want this back. It can't be all or nothing, there must be a compromise.

The petition then asks people to digitally sign a short message to Microsoft, which reads, "Give us back the Xbox One we were promised at E3[.]" Please note that we added the period at the end of that sentence, because that's how our language works.

As of this moment, the petition has attracted 3,143 signatures. It needs just 1,856 more before ... well, we don't really know. Do the people behind this campaign intend to send all of this to Microsoft? I can't see a few thousand signatures affecting the company to any real degree, particularly given that the petition looks like it was written by barely-literate teenagers. I'm not saying that to slam the people behind this movement, but there's just no way Microsoft can take a petition seriously if it lacks simple elements like proper punctuation or any sort of compelling argument beyond "we want this, you're jerks for taking it from us." It all seems very entitled, doesn't it?

Still, to each their own. If you're with this group, please take a moment to visit Change.org to toss your name into the swelling ranks of petition supporters. Or you could sit at home and revel in apathy while eating Otter Pops. If history's any indication, that's usually the best way to deal with online petitions.

Source: Change.org

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Because lord knows doing all that yourself is just too hard.

I can understand to an extent their irritation. I imagine when most people were against the DRM it was purely against the negative aspects of it. I don't think many assumed they'd just take away all of the good parts as well if they reversed their decisions.

I do think if Microsoft had managed to actually point out the benefits then people might have been more tolerant of the negative aspects, but to be honest they only have themselves to blame for all of this. The fact that they pissed people off with the DRM and then pissed off more people by removing it is not doing themselves any favours.

Now they just have two groups that dislike them. Those who haven't forgotten what they tried to add to the console, and those annoyed they took it away after announcing it.

Idiots, complete and utter idiots.

Well here comes a LV 5 shitstorm also known as a septic cyclone. It should arrive in the comments section anytime now.

This is really odd. The same thing I thought when reading the original E3 info on the Xbone was the first think I thought when reading about this petition. And that thought was this:

I never really had a problem with what Microsoft was trying to do in transferring to a digital sales system. It's just the insanely anti-consumer restrictions that come with it that are bothersome to most. I don't think that makes the consuer base that rallied against it "Uninformed," but rather insulted by the policies of a company that are punishing the legitimate consumer of a product as a blanketed practice.

The key would be to still implement the innovations that Microsoft was so touting, but to make them optional rather than mandatory. Clearly they don't trust us enough to do that, and therefore we end up in the losing situation we're in... at least that's the way I see it. (Of course, nothing that was said in this post was new or enlightening information, but there you have it. haha)

If Microsoft just made the cloud gaming thing optional from the start we wouldn't be dealing with this in the first place would we?

So they're not actually wanting the return of the DRM, but actually the family sharing and stuff, which were decent enough ideas.

Steam for Xbox? That's wishful thinking, I can't imagine MS offering the next iteration of Halo with 50 percent discount.

To each his own? Yeah, NO.

Maybe we can get shitty DRM policies installed on just THEIR consoles.

The naivet of these people just astounds me.

Thank fuck the gaming media isn't reversing its stance any time soon.

kajinking:
Well here comes a LV 5 shitstorm also known as a septic cyclone. It should arrive in the comments section anytime now.

well time to baton the hatches and fire up the old electric fence then, hopefully I've got enough supplies to last it

And with this, Microsoft has successfully shifted the blame from themselves to "those stupid evil people who complained about it and removed all the goodies from our console". Well played.

Some people are gluttons for punishment. Actually I could believe that this petition was a joke.

The trading digital games thing is situational at best, downright lazy at worst. Most people who would trade games with their friends and family live within a reasonable distance of said friends and family.

However, the DRM is always there. It negatively impacts everyone at all times. It's logically a step back for us as consumers.

And don't even get me started on the damn Kinect, ugh.

Sir Thomas Sean Connery:
Thank fuck the gaming media isn't reversing its stance any time soon.

For the record, I have no stance, I just find all of this drama interesting.

Well, and I find online petitions to be stereotypically, hilariously ineffectual.

This can only lead to make microsoft look more stupid... I don't think microsoft are loosing anything doing this DRM free this is a really stupid petition.

Does anyone else get the feeling there might be a hint of Trololololol in this petition?

The sparse details within the petition itself raises my eyebrow a few centimeters

Earnest Cavalli:

Sir Thomas Sean Connery:
Thank fuck the gaming media isn't reversing its stance any time soon.

For the record, I have no stance, I just find all of this drama interesting.

Well, and I find online petitions to be stereotypically, hilariously ineffectual.

Hey, no stance in good stance in my mind.

And yes, after the whole "Let's make the US government build a Death Star" thing got enough signatures, online petitions are kinda hard to take seriously.

As far as I'm concerned, anyone actually wanting and campaigning for the return of Microsoft's ridiculous DRM policies is welcome to go fuck themselves. They're idiots and no one should listen to them.

So basically, EA and Microsoft forced their employees to start and sign this petition to try and make it look like the Xbox One's original DRM plans were a good idea. At least, that's what I got out of this.

Andy Shandy:
So they're not actually wanting the return of the DRM, but actually the family sharing and stuff, which were decent enough ideas.

True - but those people don't seem to realise that the whole "sharing"-stuff wasn't part of the DRM. Removing that was just Microsoft being a-holes and I wouldn't mind if it would come back.
The actual DRM, however, should stay right where it is.

I have lurked the dark corners of the internet for years, and still the stupidity of people on it amazes me daily it seems.

Must...keep...head...from...exploding...

I honestly don't know where to begin with this. It's just so...so...well, here, I'll let this guy sum up my thoughts on the matter:

On another note, I can't wait to see what kind of corporate spin/bad analogies UnnDunn tries to convince us with in this topic.

Yeah a few thousand people aren't going to convince Microsoft to alienate the remaining few million potential customers...

This was to be the future of entertainment.

We decided we didn't want it to be the future of entertainment. Microsoft saw that and acted accordingly. This is generally how capitalism works.

To paraphrase Jack Nicholson: "You fucking people"

Steam for consoles wasn't necessarily going to happen, we had no guarantee that it would, also, it's easy to say that "oh, DRM isn't so bad; I'm always connected anyway!".

And then your internet goes down.

And then you are happy that you bought a game from gog that isn't part of your steam library.

I seriously can't be the only one thinking that this is something set up by the Micro$haft PR department to gauge any kind of a receptiveness to the return of its draconian DRM policies...

Y'know what? Let them have it. Let Microsoft reintroduce the stuff and let them have it. Everybody else just don't buy the damn thing. Let them have it and take close note of the names in the petition.

And the very SECOND one of the petitioneers comes whining somewhere because the servers are down or what have you, RUB IT UNDER HIS NOSE.
#DealWithIt. There's your signature. YOU WANTED IT THAT WAY. Welcome to your future.

I'm tired of railing against what is blatant stupid design and corporate lies. I've been doing it ineffectually online for quite a while now, and even with RL people they won't listen until the damage is done (*cough*D3*cough* You know who you are, people...). So let them burn themselves, if they won't learn otherwise. That way at least no one can blame me for "impressing my way onto others" or some such BS.

The rest just go buy a WiiU and pray for more games, or buy a PS4 and pray they don't alter the deal further, or just go PC. Or hell, buy a PS2. That thing is still great, y'know?

Essentially, it was Steam for Xbox.

No, it really wasn't. It had all of the drawbacks of Steam, plus a few of its own, but only a fraction of Steam's benefits. Steam comes with constant sales. Steam comes with free online multiplayer. Steam won't require you to keep your old computer and OS around when the latest and greatest is released and doesn't support old games. Steam comes with an offline mode that works for more than 24 hours. Steam adds overlay and launching support for external games and applications. Steam doesn't cost $500.

That's not to say the DRM wouldn't have had some good aspects, but nothing on the level to compete with Steam, or to make up for the bad. Certainly not when you consider its DRM was far more restrictive than Steam's, in spite of what some people will claim.

P.S. Thanks

FEichinger:
And with this, Microsoft has successfully shifted the blame from themselves to "those stupid evil people who complained about it and removed all the goodies from our console". Well played.

Oh god, I can already see it now. They'll release a statement saying how great the system would have been, but then subtly imply that the consumers ruined it for themselves because of popular demand, as though the DRM was necessary and will be necessary whenever they make changes to the Xbone and so their future DRM is justified.

It's like watching any given Hollywood film. Needlessly dramatic and horrendously predictable.

Ok for a minute I was worried that this had been about the joke petition by "Jaimy Russles"

http://www.change.org/petitions/microsoft-bring-back-xbox-onetm-drm

"We the REAL gamers must show Microsoft that we support their way of thought"

"I need drm to keep the jews away"

"I didn't fight in no war so these commie bastards can take away my right to DRM"

It included some who also signed this equally hilarious Dark Souls petition

http://www.change.org/petitions/namco-bandai-from-software-increase-the-file-size-of-the-dark-souls-pc-version

"Members of the PC master race have a vast amount of hard drive space for all their games, Dark Souls PC only weighing in at a mere 4GB is just insulting to those of us who have invested in obscene amounts of storage."

"We request that at least 150GB of dummy files be added to bloat the install size to show how cool we are for having far more HDD space than we actually need."

"Sonic Generations is 3 times bigger than this shit"

"I can't get my daily dose unless I can get me some Dark Souls with a filesize of at least 3.3 million GB."

What are "Otter Pops"?

Voulan:

FEichinger:
And with this, Microsoft has successfully shifted the blame from themselves to "those stupid evil people who complained about it and removed all the goodies from our console". Well played.

Oh god, I can already see it now. They'll release a statement saying how great the system would have been, but then subtly imply that the consumers ruined it for themselves because of popular demand, as though the DRM was necessary and will be necessary whenever they make changes to the Xbone and so their future DRM is justified.

It's like watching any given Hollywood film. Needlessly dramatic and horrendously predictable.

But no less successful in spite of it. :/

Bindal:
True - but those people don't seem to realise that the whole "sharing"-stuff wasn't part of the DRM. Removing that was just Microsoft being a-holes and I wouldn't mind if it would come back.

The DRM was protecting the digital sharing from being abused. And no company in the world would remove a cool feature of its product, just to rub the noses of its own customers. At maximum you can say, that it was there to offset the online DRM, and after removing the protection, MS does no longer feel the need to add it. But like I said, the DRM and the digital sharing were connected (if it even was a digital sharing, the last thing I saw, was that it was some sort of demoing).
I can't name even one software protection that is working even in the slightest, without a hardware piece to attach itself, or internet server to protect it. Enlighten me, please, if you know some.

Akichi Daikashima:
To paraphrase Jack Nicholson: "You fucking people"

Steam for consoles wasn't necessarily going to happen, we had no guarantee that it would, also, it's easy to say that "oh, DRM isn't so bad; I'm always connected anyway!".

And then your internet goes down.

And then you are happy that you bought a game from gog that isn't part of your steam library.

My internet goes down from time to time and I still play my games through Steam. Hell I can put my laptop in Airplane mode and play Bioshock through steam.

I'm really confused as to why people keep talking about Steam like it requires a constant connection.

Edit: Forgot my OT part

Since this is online petition is it really supposed to be serious? I mean I remember an online petition a few years ago for Blizzard (no not a typo, it said blizzard) to destroy all copies of Skyrim for corrupting children and I recall that one being mostly signed by "Alduin" and the "Society against cruelty to dragons"

Covarr:

Essentially, it was Steam for Xbox.

No, it really wasn't. It had all of the drawbacks of Steam, plus a few of its own, but only a fraction of Steam's benefits. Steam comes with constant sales. Steam comes with free online multiplayer. Steam won't require you to keep your old computer and OS around when the latest and greatest is released and doesn't support old games. Steam comes with an offline mode that works for more than 24 hours. Steam adds overlay and launching support for external games and applications. Steam doesn't cost $500.

That's not to say the DRM wouldn't have had some good aspects, but nothing on the level to compete with Steam, or to make up for the bad. Certainly not when you consider its DRM was far more restrictive than Steam's, in spite of what some people will claim.

P.S. Thanks

I was wondering how it was anything like Steam as well. I addition to what you've said, Steam also doesn't allow the trading/selling/or sharing of digital rights either like they said in the petition...or at least not yet. Why did they even use Steam as a comparison other than to bring up a DRM scheme which is much less maligned.

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