Good Old Games: Pirates Are Our Competition, Not Steam

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wombat_of_war:
i always assumed in the best case of steam going under that the publishers and developers might patch the game to make it playable

It's always bad to assume. It's especially bad o assume good will from the gaming industry.

Magmarock:

Steam is very good for people who live in the US, not so for people who don't. They don't enforce fair prices among publishes and seeing as how big they are; they probably should.

Yeah, but why would they do that? I mean, sure. It'd fit with the perception of Valve, but why would they bother making it a reality?

RicoADF:
[quote="Teoes" post="7.822178.19878288"]Yeah I'm not sure GOG could get much more convenient. Unless you're wanting to patch/mod games that you've bought (which is none of their concern so nothing they can/should deal with) it really is a case of click to buy - click to download - click to install - click to play.

I'd disagree. A lot of GOG's library requires workarounds or fixes to work on modern PCs. Some of the game straight up do not work, yet GOG sells them with little warning.

This is another decent reason why its not as popular as Steam. Piracy is one thing, selling games that straight up don't work anymore is another.

Evil Smurf:

Snotnarok:
DRM getting in the way making people want to pirate? Sounds familiar, buying a game, getting 3 installs then after fiddling with your hardware, which the game CAME WITH, you find you've used up your installs because it counts everything from HDDs to GPUs. More installs? Well there's going through all that tape with Ubisoft or just finding another website. What did I settle on? Not bothering at all.

GOG has no DRM, so what are you talking about?

DRM In general? That is a topic here, the guy from gog bringing up that he wants it to be more convenient than piracy, which many developers/pubs go against with their own policies.

Snotnarok:

Evil Smurf:

Snotnarok:
DRM getting in the way making people want to pirate? Sounds familiar, buying a game, getting 3 installs then after fiddling with your hardware, which the game CAME WITH, you find you've used up your installs because it counts everything from HDDs to GPUs. More installs? Well there's going through all that tape with Ubisoft or just finding another website. What did I settle on? Not bothering at all.

GOG has no DRM, so what are you talking about?

DRM In general? That is a topic here, the guy from gog bringing up that he wants it to be more convenient than piracy, which many developers/pubs go against with their own policies.

DRM should be more convenient then piracy, Take steam for example: you don't have to jump through hoops to play your game, just download it and hit play.

AzrealMaximillion:

I'd disagree. A lot of GOG's library requires workarounds or fixes to work on modern PCs. Some of the game straight up do not work, yet GOG sells them with little warning.

This is another decent reason why its not as popular as Steam. Piracy is one thing, selling games that straight up don't work anymore is another.

I've purchased alot of games from GoG and none have had issues running, the games have been updated (either using dos box or by patching) to work on modern systems. Not saying it's impossible, but sofar I haven't seen an issue (and I have alot of games on there).

Snotnarok:

DRM In general? That is a topic here, the guy from gog bringing up that he wants it to be more convenient than piracy, which many developers/pubs go against with their own policies.

Games on gog (weather new or old) don't have DRM as it's apart of the agreement of selling the game on the site. He's saying what gog's view on the issue of piracy is, their philosophy, and one that has worked well for them too.

Pirates are little threat. I mean Gog does a good job of things and so does steam. I am still rather pissed that there are some glaring library ommissions to both catalogs. Seriously Where the F**** is Tron 2.0. But aside from that it is fairly clear that both these services are here to stay.

And contrary to popular belief, most steam games will actually work with no net connection. There's also that the drm isn't only put in by steam, the devs themselves impose their own additional drm sometimes with those external service sign ups and what not.

Evil Smurf:
Take steam for example: you don't have to jump through hoops to play your game, just download it and hit play.

Not strictly true.

Steam update? Expect to wait for that download before you want to play.
Want to install your game on your laptop? Need to install Steam first.
Unexpected internet outage before you set your games to "offline"? Well, there's always that book you've been putting off reading...

Admittedly small hoops, but they're there nonetheless. And that's still not the biggest advantage of GoG over Steam.

By tying your games to Steam, you are allowing Valve to change the rules that allow you to play your game, any time after your purchase. They can put whatever obnoxious terms they want into the TOS, and if you refuse, your library is gone. With GoG, they're out of the way once you've got your grubby little paws on the installer. No Steam DRM, and no first-party DRM either.

It's good to see GoG have a good idea as to who are truly threatening them. As always, best of luck in their enterprise, I hope they continue to increase in popularity.

RicoADF:

AzrealMaximillion:

I'd disagree. A lot of GOG's library requires workarounds or fixes to work on modern PCs. Some of the game straight up do not work, yet GOG sells them with little warning.

This is another decent reason why its not as popular as Steam. Piracy is one thing, selling games that straight up don't work anymore is another.

I've purchased alot of games from GoG and none have had issues running, the games have been updated (either using dos box or by patching) to work on modern systems. Not saying it's impossible, but sofar I haven't seen an issue (and I have alot of games on there).

Snotnarok:

DRM In general? That is a topic here, the guy from gog bringing up that he wants it to be more convenient than piracy, which many developers/pubs go against with their own policies.

Games on gog (weather new or old) don't have DRM as it's apart of the agreement of selling the game on the site. He's saying what gog's view on the issue of piracy is, their philosophy, and one that has worked well for them too.

Yes I'm aware, I was just stating that I had issue with a dev who DIDN'T go by that logic. Who'd rather you jump through hoops, I'll make an edit so this is more clear.

If steam/Valve was ever about to go under, all they need to do is throw out the hint that HL3 is cancelled and everyone would buy like crazy from them to prop up the likelyhood of it finally being released.

As for GOG/CDPR, I bought Witcher 2 directly from them because they promised (and delivered) on the no DRM. Even though it's still on my backlog, I want to support a company that supports gamers with actions not just lip service.

Snotnarok:

Yes I'm aware, I was just stating that I had issue with a dev who DIDN'T go by that logic. Who'd rather you jump through hoops, I'll make an edit so this is more clear.

Ah my mistake, it's 1am here so that's my excuse :-P

Quite a a lot of people think something along the lines of "I don't want to pay for a decade old game when not even a cent is going to the developer or maker of the game".
And I understand the way of thinking to some extend.
And lets not forget that GoG does actually sells "pirated" games. There were quite a few cases where the games executable was a crack created by some pirate group.

Yeah, some people don't really like GoG for those reasons.

While I do think it's very laudable to have the goal of an easy to use service; I kind of feel like they should see Steam as competition.

Sorry, I'm pretty sure that the two services have library overlap as well as being heavily invested in selling nostalgia and impulse buy gaming. You may be competing with pirates, but you have other competitors.

Except Origin, which is still a joke.

targren:
Steam update? Expect to wait for that download before you want to play.
Want to install your game on your laptop? Need to install Steam first.
Unexpected internet outage before you set your games to "offline"? Well, there's always that book you've been putting off reading...

About two weeks ago, my internet was down for two days straight. My ability to play games on steam, which I had not gone through any extra steps to "set to offline", was completely unimpeded. Also, it occasionally asks me if I want to restart to install a steam update, but it's never refused to let me keep playing games if I put it off.

And this is why I use GOG. They understand. And, they're awesome. Prices might be a bit higher than I'd like, but that they're even still upholding some of those games is just outstanding. Anyways, off to check their sales!

i love GOG, they really are my first choice for games

Wanna beat the pirates? Offer something they don't have. A dedicated client, a game manager. That's one of the biggest reasons I prefer Steam to GOG, and I'd bet it's something that would seriously curb piracy.

P.S. Thanks

A game retailer that recognizes that legal or not, they are in competition with the pirates? Color me impressed. The key to fighting pirates isn't to demonize them, it's to outcompete them. Competing with free is hard, it's not impossible. You just have to give a better product for a reasonable price. Otherwise bottled water wouldn't be the huge industry it is, everybody would just buy a reusable bottle and keep it filled at all times.

Covarr:
Wanna beat the pirates? Offer something they don't have. A dedicated client, a game manager. That's one of the biggest reasons I prefer Steam to GOG, and I'd bet it's something that would seriously curb piracy.

P.S. Thanks

GOG has an optional download client to use.

Something like Steam would be DRM though, and the lack of DRM is what makes GOG so awesome.

This mostly applies to the older games but GOG is very solid about making sure to include fan patches that are basically required for a smooth experience. This makes life a little bit easier as well, no searching through defunct websites to find it. The community there is quite good also.

Torrent trackers carry linux games. Get on it GOG!

RicoADF:
[quote="AzrealMaximillion" post="7.822178.19878968"]
I'd disagree. A lot of GOG's library requires workarounds or fixes to work on modern PCs. Some of the game straight up do not work, yet GOG sells them with little warning.

This is another decent reason why its not as popular as Steam. Piracy is one thing, selling games that straight up don't work anymore is another.

I've purchased alot of games from GoG and none have had issues running, the games have been updated (either using dos box or by patching) to work on modern systems. Not saying it's impossible, but sofar I haven't seen an issue (and I have alot of games on there).

You're one of the lucky ones. Take a stroll through the GOG forums sometime. The place is filled with complaints about games either having trouble or flat out not working. Also, there's a list of games that GOG sells that will flat out not work with Windows 8. That's going to be a problem for them in a few years when gamers are one or two OS generations part that.

Not going to lie there is a part of me that is utterly terrified of the eventuality of Steam going darkside. I sincerely doubt it'll happen, but still, the option's there...

GOG is, however, an excellent alternative to it. Unfortunately it's a moot point for me as Steam is my main platform.

Jamous:
Not going to lie there is a part of me that is utterly terrified of the eventuality of Steam going darkside. I sincerely doubt it'll happen, but still, the option's there...

GOG is, however, an excellent alternative to it. Unfortunately it's a moot point for me as Steam is my main platform.

Ya know whats funny? If you primarily buy games off of GoG you don't need any platforms!

Imagine that. Not needin extra software to run the software you legally own instead of only holdin a license to games that you don't own on Steam accordin to Valve.

shintakie10:

Jamous:
Not going to lie there is a part of me that is utterly terrified of the eventuality of Steam going darkside. I sincerely doubt it'll happen, but still, the option's there...

GOG is, however, an excellent alternative to it. Unfortunately it's a moot point for me as Steam is my main platform.

Ya know whats funny? If you primarily buy games off of GoG you don't need any platforms!

Imagine that. Not needin extra software to run the software you legally own instead of only holdin a license to games that you don't own on Steam accordin to Valve.

I know, but currently the benefits of Steam outweigh the downsides. They do great sales, I don't often have any issues with them and it's getting the point with many games where I -NEED- Steam to play them, regardless of whether I want to buy it off Steam or not (Skyrim, Total War, Borderlands, etc.). Not only that you have to ask yourself. Whilst they -could- dick everyone over and shut down Steam, why would they? It only serves to make Valve more money, and it would also be ridiculously out of character for a usually pretty decent company. I'm not saying the situation's perfect, playing games offline is still a huge issue for instance, but it's certainly not bad.

Magmarock:
because it's my game and I shouldn't need permission to install it.

It isn't your game though.

You are renting it for a one time licensing fee with restrictions. People haven't actually bought games since the late 90s early 2000s.

Mycroft Holmes:

Magmarock:
because it's my game and I shouldn't need permission to install it.

It isn't your game though.

You are renting it for a one time licensing fee with restrictions. People haven't actually bought games since the late 90s early 2000s.

Technically that is true, but it's a bunch of BS. If you pay for something it should be yours. Also it's worth mentioning that is some countries the practice of such licenses is illegal. Vavle was actually taken to court in Germany for this. I wish more countries cared about their consumer rights.

Zachary Amaranth:

wombat_of_war:
i always assumed in the best case of steam going under that the publishers and developers might patch the game to make it playable

It's always bad to assume. It's especially bad o assume good will from the gaming industry.

Magmarock:

Steam is very good for people who live in the US, not so for people who don't. They don't enforce fair prices among publishes and seeing as how big they are; they probably should.

Yeah, but why would they do that? I mean, sure. It'd fit with the perception of Valve, but why would they bother making it a reality?

I guess Valve don't care for their foreign consumers. No matter, there's always GOG which will be getting the Witcher 3. Speaking of I'm not sure it's even fair to call Vavle a games compeny anymore. I mean there's delays but this is starting to remind me of Dukenukem.

a very refreshing look at things. Ah, GOG, i dont use you, but i completely and fully support what you stand for.

Magmarock:
"understand that not all pirates are criminals, they are just trying to cut through all the DRM restrictions and simply play the games they want to."

Longino I love you. Well said and I admit I torrent games I own to get around the DRM because it's my game and I shouldn't need permission to install it.

sadly, that is a criminal offense thanks to the laws companies lobbied.

BrotherRool:
Valve seem like a company who would do their best to release their games to you but I guess the problem is that in the situation where Steam is closing down they're probably in a horrible cataclysmic mess where what few staff that remain basically aren't even providing for their families. Devoting coding time to a solution for everyone (and even paying for bandwidth to distribute the solution) might not even be feasible.

I wonder if they would get in any legal trouble as well. Their are a lot of third-party publishers who force you to sign up with steam because they're using the steamworks DRM. Presumably Valve sold them that service, or agreed to give it to them in exchange for tying people into their steam accounts more. I wonder if those contracts would allow Valve to ever disable the DRM if they so chose.

valve said they already got the solution programmed. all they would need to do is push a button to launch the patch. the bandwtich problem is real though, but i am willing to bet some good guy is going to mirror it even if valve collapses.

Teoes:
Hell from my limited knowledge of pirated games, aren't they more complex than that? I thought you generally had to muck about with ISOs and mounting virtual discs and all that jazz. Sounds like hassle to me. Pff I thought those pirates were supposed to be providing a service.

when it comes to games basically it is a click-donwload. click-mount, click-install, click-apply crack (not always necessary, some inhalations come pre-cracked), click-play.

frizzlebyte:
I don't actually do that, as I'm not sure how much my ISP monitors torrent traffic, but I can say that if I lost a game and had to get it from a torrent site, I'd be like Longino and not feel bad about it. That's the *only* time I'd do it, though. Otherwise, DEATH TO THE PIRATES!

very little.
1. most ISP do not have capital to put hardware in place to even begin such efforts, they would go bancrupt. there is A LOT of torrent trafic. They tried to force that in my country and 10 largest ISPs came and said they may as well clsoe thier doors down because its either that or doubling the prices, and in the end the law failed.
2. a lot of torrent traffic is legal. most MMOs update via torrent protocol. there is a lot of public domain and freeware going around via public domain. plenty of smaller program makers use torrent to share the installation as they save up on hosting costs because users host for them. people talking about torrents seems to always ignore that a HUGE chunk of torrent traffic is perfectly legal. Torrent protocol is the most efficient file transfer protocol we have to date.
3. most pirate traffic is encrypted now, so even if monitored it would not say anything really. at best it could tell you the tracker your connecting to. of course there are open traffic, as encrypting take extra processing power, but that was maybe actual 10-5 years ago, not with current computing power. so the amount of open traffic diminished.
4. even if they track torrent traffic, theres so much data that it would be very hard to sift through it.

Steven Bogos:

You're right, installing a game off an ISO would actually be an extra couple of steps. You can throw in one step more if the torrent is in a split rar.

torrents havent used split rars for years now. an exception is programs, where release groups imagine that thier triple-split rar files (imagine a split rar in a split rar in a split rar) is somehow make the files "less visible". split rars were used back when technology wanst reliable enough and people with very slow internet (think dialup) needed to download smaller files one by one. it is obsolete now. heck, the "scene" is usually late for the party and it does not do it anymore even.

llafnwod:
I know, man, I was agreeing with you. But using a crack to circumvent DRM on a legitimately purchased game is still usually a breach of the EULA.

OBreach of eula gets you banned in multiplayer, btu thats about it. it has no legal power.

Desert Punk:

With your standard torrent service you have to scroll through torrents to find one you like..

you have never visited a torrent site have you....

AzrealMaximillion:

I'd disagree. A lot of GOG's library requires workarounds or fixes to work on modern PCs. Some of the game straight up do not work, yet GOG sells them with little warning.

This is another decent reason why its not as popular as Steam. Piracy is one thing, selling games that straight up don't work anymore is another.

i dont use GOG, but talking to peopel that do i got an impressing that GOG takes games that as you say wont run on modern PCs, and actually make them playable before release. For example Dungeon Keeper installer no longer works from the original disc because it says "you have no windows installed" (even though the game is supposed to work on DOS too). GOG version works. though the fans have created an altered version (kinda mod but more like a re-build) which allows much more (liek high resolution) and stuff which is what i used (it actually took the files from the disc witohut need of instalation). but the point is GOG usually fixes this stuff.

BiH-Kira:

And lets not forget that GoG does actually sells "pirated" games. There were quite a few cases where the games executable was a crack created by some pirate group.

Cracks are public domain and can be used and sold by anyone. Cracks are not technically illegal. they are illegal only if they allwo you to play a game you would not normally (as in you dont have to buy it). when Securom failed, the company taking care of costumemr support often used No-CD cracks as fixes for players, sometiems even linking them to site where the crack originated (securom is obsolete now but yeah). if the crack works better than original launcher (for exampel fails to recognize modern windows), there is no problem using that.

Magmarock:
Technically that is true, but it's a bunch of BS. If you pay for something it should be yours. Also it's worth mentioning that is some countries the practice of such licenses is illegal. Vavle was actually taken to court in Germany for this. I wish more countries cared about their consumer rights.

if you pay for a taxi the taxi belong to you? if you pay for a flight you own the plane? if you pay taxes for police you own police? do you understand the concept of service?

Strazdas:

frizzlebyte:
I don't actually do that, as I'm not sure how much my ISP monitors torrent traffic, but I can say that if I lost a game and had to get it from a torrent site, I'd be like Longino and not feel bad about it. That's the *only* time I'd do it, though. Otherwise, DEATH TO THE PIRATES!

very little.
1. most ISP do not have capital to put hardware in place to even begin such efforts, they would go bancrupt. there is A LOT of torrent trafic. They tried to force that in my country and 10 largest ISPs came and said they may as well clsoe thier doors down because its either that or doubling the prices, and in the end the law failed.
2. a lot of torrent traffic is legal. most MMOs update via torrent protocol. there is a lot of public domain and freeware going around via public domain. plenty of smaller program makers use torrent to share the installation as they save up on hosting costs because users host for them. people talking about torrents seems to always ignore that a HUGE chunk of torrent traffic is perfectly legal. Torrent protocol is the most efficient file transfer protocol we have to date.
3. most pirate traffic is encrypted now, so even if monitored it would not say anything really. at best it could tell you the tracker your connecting to. of course there are open traffic, as encrypting take extra processing power, but that was maybe actual 10-5 years ago, not with current computing power. so the amount of open traffic diminished.
4. even if they track torrent traffic, theres so much data that it would be very hard to sift through it.

Wow, thanks for the in-depth response, Strazdas. Very informative. And I was actually aware that a lot of torrent traffic is legal; that's how I downloaded my IndieGameStand copy of Alan Wake, after all.

I just wish Bittorrent had a better rep than it does. In the mainstream, it still carries the stench of illegality for a lot of people that it really shouldn't have.

frizzlebyte:
[quote="Strazdas" post="7.822178.19882576"]
I just wish Bittorrent had a better rep than it does. In the mainstream, it still carries the stench of illegality for a lot of people that it really shouldn't have.

games make you killers, tv destroy your brain, torrent is evil, rock and roll will raise the devil, basically everythign has bad rep anyway.

capcha: been there
indeed, i have.

Magmarock:

I guess Valve don't care for their foreign consumers. No matter, there's always GOG which will be getting the Witcher 3. Speaking of I'm not sure it's even fair to call Vavle a games compeny anymore. I mean there's delays but this is starting to remind me of Dukenukem.

I'm not sure they care about their customers, period. I think they mostly look as good as they do because they stand alongside such humanitarian luminaries as Electronic Arts and Microsoft.

As for the game company part, don't they have a couple games coming out? I've never cared much for Valve games, not being as enamoured with the FPS as most people, but I could have sworn they had a couple games coming out in between not releasing Episode 3 and (insert other title with 2 at the end here). Fair point if I'm wrong, but I could swear they did.

Magmarock:

If you pay for something it should be yours.

So renting apartments shouldn't be a thing? Or just if you rent an apartment you're allowed to burn it down and the owner of the property who apparently isn't an owner, is also not allowed to say anything to stop it because you paid them money?

Things aren't that simple.

Magmarock:
Also it's worth mentioning that is some countries the practice of such licenses is illegal.

Some countries also force little girls to marry pedophile rapists because a thousand year old book said so. What other countries legal systems do is not an argument that can be used to determine what is or isn't right.

Magmarock:
Vavle was actually taken to court in Germany for this. I wish more countries cared about their consumer rights.

And what about the companies and the hundreds of employees who's livelihood depends on them?

Follow this chain of logic:

You are allowed to buy a game, ipso ergo you own the rights to that game and can do whatever you want with it.

You are allowed to buy blank DVDs. Which again, you own the rights do and can do with what you please.

You are allowed to buy a DVD writer. Again rights, ect ect.

Now because you fully own all the content and all the pieces and there are no licensing rights to stand in your way. You are completely allowed to copy off DVDs and then compete directly with the actual game creators. You could sell them in ziplock bags on a street corner for 5$ And then what? The developer has to sell them for a buck? And you lower your price to 50 cents because buying bulk discs is so cheap you can still turn a profit so why not?

And yeah there are people who would do that. Because people are assholes. And the people buying from them would write it off as it is the assholes problem and that they are just the consumer. Because human beings are experts at passing the buck. And now the developer can't sell their game for a profit and they can't pay the 100k a year it takes to keep the average programmer on with benefits and pay.

That is why when you buy a song or a book/story or a computer game, anything that is fairly easy to manufacture or disseminate, you aren't actually buying it. Because in this day and age intellectual property is more complex than I BOUGHT IT SO I SHOULD OWN IT! It isn't like a table or a computer; where creating it takes a bunch of equipment and a high degree of skill and a long time working. And because it is so simple, the creators. The author, the lead guitarist, the programer, and yes even the dirty publishers who put their money on the line funding all of those other people, all rely on licensing rights to protect their livelihoods against the guy with 500$ worth of equipment and a lack of forethought.

They aren't doing it because they are assholes. They are doing it because they have been forced down that road and there really aren't any better options. They license the rights to you pretty much forever and unless people are total assholes and do illegal stuff like chargeback on a game that was delivered to them in a functioning condition, they really don't ever take away that right.

Oh and bringing suit means nothing. Anyone can sue anyone for anything, it doesn't mean they won. I have family friends who got sued by their neighbors for 'having too many friends.' I had a teacher who's best friend was murdered by a drunk driver when she was a kid; that driver then sued the parents of the little girl she killed for 'emotional distress of having killed a person.' Being brought to court means fuck all.

And it wasn't Germany that brought them to court. It was a consumer rights group, VZBV. And guess what? They already brought the same suit against Valve years ago, alleging the same complaint. It went to the German Supreme Court and they sided in favor of valve and the licensing rights of intellectual property.

Mycroft Holmes:

Magmarock:

If you pay for something it should be yours.

So renting apartments shouldn't be a thing? Or just if you rent an apartment you're allowed to burn it down and the owner of the property who apparently isn't an owner, is also not allowed to say anything to stop it because you paid them money?

Things aren't that simple.

Magmarock:
Also it's worth mentioning that is some countries the practice of such licenses is illegal.

Some countries also force little girls to marry pedophile rapists because a thousand year old book said so. What other countries legal systems do is not an argument that can be used to determine what is or isn't right.

Magmarock:
Vavle was actually taken to court in Germany for this. I wish more countries cared about their consumer rights.

And what about the companies and the hundreds of employees who's livelihood depends on them?

Follow this chain of logic:

You are allowed to buy a game, ipso ergo you own the rights to that game and can do whatever you want with it.

You are allowed to buy blank DVDs. Which again, you own the rights do and can do with what you please.

You are allowed to buy a DVD writer. Again rights, ect ect.

Now because you fully own all the content and all the pieces and there are no licensing rights to stand in your way. You are completely allowed to copy off DVDs and then compete directly with the actual game creators. You could sell them in ziplock bags on a street corner for 5$ And then what? The developer has to sell them for a buck? And you lower your price to 50 cents because buying bulk discs is so cheap you can still turn a profit so why not?

And yeah there are people who would do that. Because people are assholes. And the people buying from them would write it off as it is the assholes problem and that they are just the consumer. Because human beings are experts at passing the buck. And now the developer can't sell their game for a profit and they can't pay the 100k a year it takes to keep the average programmer on with benefits and pay.

That is why when you buy a song or a book/story or a computer game, anything that is fairly easy to manufacture or disseminate, you aren't actually buying it. Because in this day and age intellectual property is more complex than I BOUGHT IT SO I SHOULD OWN IT! It isn't like a table or a computer; where creating it takes a bunch of equipment and a high degree of skill and a long time working. And because it is so simple, the creators. The author, the lead guitarist, the programer, and yes even the dirty publishers who put their money on the line funding all of those other people, all rely on licensing rights to protect their livelihoods against the guy with 500$ worth of equipment and a lack of forethought.

They aren't doing it because they are assholes. They are doing it because they have been forced down that road and there really aren't any better options. They license the rights to you pretty much forever and unless people are total assholes and do illegal stuff like chargeback on a game that was delivered to them in a functioning condition, they really don't ever take away that right.

Oh and bringing suit means nothing. Anyone can sue anyone for anything, it doesn't mean they won. I have family friends who got sued by their neighbors for 'having too many friends.' I had a teacher who's best friend was murdered by a drunk driver when she was a kid; that driver then sued the parents of the little girl she killed for 'emotional distress of having killed a person.' Being brought to court means fuck all.

And it wasn't Germany that brought them to court. It was a consumer rights group, VZBV. And guess what? They already brought the same suit against Valve years ago, alleging the same complaint. It went to the German Supreme Court and they sided in favor of valve and the licensing rights of intellectual property.

Oh my god that has way too much put into it. Look, if you going to take things to the absolute extremes like renting property and compare it to buying a video game, that's just silly. If you're going to be charged upwards of $50 or $100 for a game you shouldn't need to deal with online DRM to use it. I don't call the phone company to make a call and I don't connect my TV to the internet to use it either. DRM servs the publishers not the consumers.

As for lively hoods, well if you're lively hood involves taking away the rights of others then I can't see see myself defending it. It's like saying "yeah he's a thief but that's his lively hood you know."

Game publishers have been getting more and more desperate to ruin consumer rights (remember SOPA and PIPA) and I am no longer connived piracy has anything to do with it. I think it's more to do with killing the competition of self publishing. Vavle are starting to look more and more like Microsoft and in the way they do things. This kind of business practice leads to so many probables and you're not helping annoying by apologizing for it.

It's gotta stop, especially with services like GOG that prove that we really don't need Steam and big publishers.

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