Chinese Museum Closes As Most Of Its Exhibits Are Fake

Chinese Museum Closes As Most Of Its Exhibits Are Fake

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Whoops! A dodgy Qing Dynasty vase. How did that get in the collection?

If you spent $88 million to build a world class museum, chances are you'd like to know that at least some of the exhibits on display aren't cack-handed knock-offs of the real deal. Such is not the case in China's Jibaozhai Museum, owned by local Communist party leader Wang Zongquan. Turns out over 40,000 of its exhibits - each costing something like 100 to 2000 yuan, or about $325 tops, according to the Beijing News - are about as kosher as a bacon sandwich. "I'm positive that we do have authentic items in the museum," says museum chief consultant Wei Yingjun, who went on to say that at least 80 items in the collection had been confirmed as authentic. Wei poured scorn on the whistleblower, Ma Boyong, a writer who visited the museum and then told the internet about the travesties on display. "He [acted] like the head of a rebel group during the Cultural Revolution - leading a bunch of Red Guards and making chaos," said Wei. Wondering about the quality of those fakes? Have a look at this lovely Qing Dynasty vase, and ask yourself whether you'd be fooled by it.

"Even the gods cannot tell whether the exhibits are fake or not," said Wang Zonquan, according to the Shanghai Daily. Which would make for an interesting verification process, it must be said; I know I'd start paying attention if, on a placard next to a purported Renoir, God announced that, in His opinion, this was the real deal. It'd probably help the effect if there were scorch marks, as if left by a lightning bolt, next to the display. Jibaozhai's 12 vast halls, stuffed full of cultural wonderworks, are no longer open to the public, as the authorities have insisted on its closure. Jibaozhai has "no qualification to be a museum as its collections are a fake," said a government official.

The museum's founders have been accused of squandering village funds by taking cash from land sales to pay for Jibaozhai, and are being investigated. Money laundering charges may be levied.

Source: Guardian

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Don't you hate it when that happens

RatherDull:
Don't you hate it when that happens

Nothing worse than finding out your Quing Dynasty vase is less than legit. Happened to me last week :(

They must have hired Asiana pilots to approve these
Because Sum Ting Wong!

Just turn it into a knock-off musuem. Simple.

"Even the gods cannot tell whether the exhibits are fake or not.." I approve of the man's confidence, at least.

I take it the thing in the pic is this alleged "Quing Dynasty vase"? Yeah, that straight up looks like something I did for arts-and-crafts in summer camp when I was 11. Granted, I don't know much about ancient Chinese art, but I always imagined their art would be more..."artful" than smiley faces and squiggly lines... >.>

Leviano:

RatherDull:
Don't you hate it when that happens

Nothing worse than finding out your Quing Dynasty vase is less than legit. Happened to me last week :(

Virtually everything in the museum is a fake.

Bit different to one vase.

Karloff:
Chinese Museum Closes As Most Of Its Exhibits Are Fake
"I'm positive that we do have authentic items in the museum," says museum chief consultant Wei Yingjun

You know it's a bad day when you have to reassure people that at least a few of the thousands of exhibits in your museum might be real.

It's funny how angry the owner is that he was found out, to the point of comparing the guy who discovered it to a cultural revolution rebel leader.

Most museums in the Western world display fakes too. Except we call them 'replicas'.

Those big dino bones in the lobby? Yeah, only in a couple museums are those actual fossils.

MinionJoe:
Most museums in the Western world display fakes too. Except we call them 'replicas'.

Those big dino bones in the lobby? Yeah, only in a couple museums are those actual fossils.

Indeed, it's a mixture of protecting the real ones from damage (accidents, theft etc), and being able to show them at multiple museums at once (have a few copies made and have them on display with the real one in the lab/archives). Makes sense really.

The Qing Dynasty (not Quing) is probably the Dynasty whose artworks we in the West are most familiar with, being the final one (1644 to 1912) and the one with the most contact with the West. Massive amounts of china porcelain was exported to the West and although that intended for domestic consumption was often considerably different from the stuff exported, it's pretty safe to say that is by no means genuine Qing porcelain or stoneware.

MinionJoe:
Most museums in the Western world display fakes too. Except we call them 'replicas'.

Those big dino bones in the lobby? Yeah, only in a couple museums are those actual fossils.

True, but the replicas tend to be reasonably accurate reproductions, as opposed to googly eyes octopods.

They've clearly been talking to whoever restored Babylon for Saddam Hussein, nothing wrong with choosing established workmen.

The happy octopus amputee with a snail(?) for a hat sure looks authentic.
Actually, I think I would pay admission to see the exhibits, even knowing they're all as legit as my shoes. Because they're great shoes.

And yet I'm not surprised, China has been providing fake items for......*counts on fingers*......more then 16.47 years.

Fake chinese pottery from China?

You dawg!

Interestingly, the underlying pattern on that vase looks almost kinda like the patterns on some antique china to my untrained eye, but still off somehow (maybe it's a poorly applied decal?). Without the PlaySkool decorations it might even pass in a dim light.

Evil Smurf:
And yet I'm not surprised, China has been providing fake items for......*counts on fingers*......more then 16.47 years.

Actually for several hundred years, since most of the porcelain exported to the West was designed for Western tastes (and to survive a harsh sea journey), and apparently often of lower quality that that intended for domestic use . See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_Export_Porcelain for more detail.

"As god, I can safely say in all confidence that this is a piece of fake shit.... What? I'm god! I don't lie!!! Is that a real Wii U2? .... Throw in the girl and you have a deal!"

Maybe its fake but the happy octopus is sort of adorable. That being said while i'd probably pay 10 to own one i dont think id be too pleased if i paid for entry into that hall of Bullshit

A better title would have been:...

"Fake Pot found in Chinese Museum"

Because, that would have gotten tons of views for multiple reasons. Just saying.

Oh China, you and your knock-offs...

Most likely this is intended.
First the land was taken from their poor owners by force via the government officials for a couple of thousand Yuan. Then the museum was built using government funds with the in china usual corruption filling the pockets of officials and industrials alike. Now the building will be abandoned, razed and afterwards the land will be sold to another one of their chums for dirt cheap all while the original owners see nothing of the money.
It's business practice in most of chine anyway...

rapidoud:

Leviano:

RatherDull:
Don't you hate it when that happens

Nothing worse than finding out your Quing Dynasty vase is less than legit. Happened to me last week :(

Virtually everything in the museum is a fake.

Bit different to one vase.

I think they're joking around. ;)

Unless Leviano really does have a fake Quing Dynasty vase...

They may aswell renamed the museum Historical knockoff museum, showcasing the history of copyright infrigment and other copy cats stuff.

Teoes:
Just turn it into a knock-off musuem. Simple.

Consider a career in marketing. That idea is genius.

Does the Museum have a Ping Dynasty exhibit showing ancient Chinese wonders such as these:

http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/completelist/0,29569,1998580,00.html

I'm guessing this is all down to corruption, someone decided to use government money to buy a bunch of fake art claiming it was expensive and pocketed the difference. The reaction of the curator is kind of odd, probably because he is in on it.

Gasp! Someone found a whole bunch of counterfeits and knock-offs in China? DO TELL!
Double gasp! There are a whole bunch of corrupt jag-offs in positions of high power in China? DO DOUBLEY TELL!
All right, I'm done joking around...Well, actually, one more: Somebody with half a brain stem found out that that mess of an arts-and-crafts vase isn't a real artifact from the Qing Dynasty? How cooouuuulld they tell?!...Now I'm done.

Captcha: Fatter Wallet. For the museum owners? Doubt it, captcha. For corrupt officials? Mmmm...yeah, probably.

Am I supposed to be surprised?

ThunderCavalier:

Teoes:
Just turn it into a knock-off musuem. Simple.

Consider a career in marketing. That idea is genius.

Agreed.

I recently went to a wax museum and NONE of the people in there were the actual dead people I was expecting. They were all just wax statues. They didn't even really look that much like the people they were representing. And they weren't life size--like only several inches high. And they were mostly made from paper instead of wax. Hmmm. I may have been in a library.

Everything made in China is, well... "Made in China".

So imma just go out on a limb an say this reporter is gonna "disappear". Tank man "disappeared" and this chick will too for whistle blowing on a state run facility owned by a party leader. Rest in peace you brave soul.

OT- Well, that sucks for them. Also, made in China and all that.

 

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