Steam Getting Parental Controls via "Kid Mode"

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Steam Getting Parental Controls via "Kid Mode"

Steam logo

A technical slip-up may have revealed the next feature to come to Steam - a PIN-based parental control mode.

Gaming has always been a hobby for all ages, though obviously not every game is suitable for young'uns. Modern game consoles address this with optional parental controls, though the PC has always been more difficult to monitor. Valve may be taking the initiative on this front, if rumors of parental controls coming to Steam are true. A Steam user recently stumbled into something called "Kid Mode," possibly unveiling the next feature in development for the digital distribution client.

"My client has been putting me into 'Kid Mode,'", the confused user explains in a bug report. "I have not configured or set it up at all, and you can't turn it off without a PIN." It's hardly an official feature list, but it looks like the owner of the Steam account will be able to toggle "Kid Mode" to somehow restrict access to certain games. It's unknown how exactly it will work: it might block games above a certain ESRB rating, or the account own may have custom control over which games are allowed to be played in Kid Mode.

A Valve representative responded to the post, remarking that nobody should be able to access that functionality. When another user commented, "I never knew Steam had Parental Control," the Valve rep replied: "It's not supposed to yet."

Judging by the language used by Valve's techie, this is more than just a rumored development. Combined with the already-implemented Big Picture mode, Kid Mode would put Steam that much closer to rivaling consoles for control of the living room, with all the options we've come to expect in that gaming environment.

Source: Steam Community

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So, instead of the gritty and dark grey layout it's going to be Pyro Vision at all times? :D
Please tell me it's that!

I would like a "family mode" where I could play a game from my profile on my PC and my brother play another game from the same profile on his laptop. A game can only be played by one person at a time.

It makes no sense that we would need to buy the same game 2 times.

Cognimancer:
"It's not supposed to yet."

Hahahaha

Anyways, while I'm not interested in the kids mode in itself, I hope it means Valve's going to implement more game-sharing features.

Well, this can't hurt. Maybe it's a preemptive measure measure just in case crazy anti-video game activists scream about how their kids spent hundreds of dollars on Steam.

Awesome. Lego Batman and Hotline Miami are both on my Living Room PC and I'd like to limit my 5 year old's access to the more "mature" games while Grandma and Grandpa are watching them. As it is they aren't allowed to play without an adult in the room, but anything that can streamline the process for my parents is good.

Well, steam is making a tool for parents to restrict their children it seems. Because blocking off information is always easier than teaching children to be responsible. Always blame everyone but the parent. always.

Strazdas:
Well, steam is making a tool for parents to restrict their children it seems. Because blocking off information is always easier than teaching children to be responsible. Always blame everyone but the parent. always.

How is this putting the blame on everyone but parents? It is allowing parents to restrict the games their children have access to without having to hover over their children's shoulders at all times. Parents should talk to their children and teach them to be responsible, but creating tools to enforce the word of law helps to remove the temptation to bend the rules when the supervisory units aren't standing watch directly over the kids. Most children, even the most obedient, will try to bend the rules just to see what they can get away with especially when the popular thing is what is not allowed to them.

Strazdas:
Well, steam is making a tool for parents to restrict their children it seems. Because blocking off information is always easier than teaching children to be responsible. Always blame everyone but the parent. always.

I'd rather Steam gave us a tool to stop our kids playing inappropriate games than that the government release some law or other restricting or punishing Steam users who are underage or let underage users play mature games. I get that you have a vendetta against the whole "it's everyone's fault/responsibility but the parents'" mentality, but I think you're taking it a bit far. If anything, such parental tools are putting the responsibility in the parent's hands.
I for one let my little brother use my account regularly, and I'd like the option of being able to leave him alone when he plays Portal, rather than keeping an eye on him in case he decides Dead Space sounds interesting.

OT: So they only just decided to implement this? Every other modern console and handheld on the market already has this. Come on Valve, little things like these keep us from being the true PC master race we're destined to be.

Oh god... if this doesn't backfire then I will consider all of us lucky.

I actually expect that angry misguided facebook parents will start to take alot more notice to steam and demand that it be made a safe enviroment for everyone to use.

Ken Sapp:

Strazdas:
Well, steam is making a tool for parents to restrict their children it seems. Because blocking off information is always easier than teaching children to be responsible. Always blame everyone but the parent. always.

How is this putting the blame on everyone but parents? It is allowing parents to restrict the games their children have access to without having to hover over their children's shoulders at all times. Parents should talk to their children and teach them to be responsible, but creating tools to enforce the word of law helps to remove the temptation to bend the rules when the supervisory units aren't standing watch directly over the kids. Most children, even the most obedient, will try to bend the rules just to see what they can get away with especially when the popular thing is what is not allowed to them.

It is a system which in is essence is restricting children from unvanted content by locking them out, implying that lack of this system is the reason kids wanted to play these games. A good parent teaches and explains, not deny acess. IF you are a good parent your child will be able to determine whether he wants to play certain game or not, removing the need for age restriction to begin with.

Infernal Lawyer:

I'd rather Steam gave us a tool to stop our kids playing inappropriate games than that the government release some law or other restricting or punishing Steam users who are underage or let underage users play mature games.

Id rather have parents doing, you know, actual parenting than creating more tools for parents to allow PC be the nanny and continue ignoring their children. Such laws already exist in many countries and are one of the most fucked up things in existence.

but I think you're taking it a bit far. If anything, such parental tools are putting the responsibility in the parent's hands.

how is a tool which is meant for restriction are going to teach children responsibility? all this does is allow parents to make PC do their parenting without needing to do actual parenting.

Strazdas:

Ken Sapp:

Strazdas:
Well, steam is making a tool for parents to restrict their children it seems. Because blocking off information is always easier than teaching children to be responsible. Always blame everyone but the parent. always.

How is this putting the blame on everyone but parents? It is allowing parents to restrict the games their children have access to without having to hover over their children's shoulders at all times. Parents should talk to their children and teach them to be responsible, but creating tools to enforce the word of law helps to remove the temptation to bend the rules when the supervisory units aren't standing watch directly over the kids. Most children, even the most obedient, will try to bend the rules just to see what they can get away with especially when the popular thing is what is not allowed to them.

It is a system which in is essence is restricting children from unvanted content by locking them out, implying that lack of this system is the reason kids wanted to play these games. A good parent teaches and explains, not deny acess. IF you are a good parent your child will be able to determine whether he wants to play certain game or not, removing the need for age restriction to begin with.

Infernal Lawyer:

I'd rather Steam gave us a tool to stop our kids playing inappropriate games than that the government release some law or other restricting or punishing Steam users who are underage or let underage users play mature games.

Id rather have parents doing, you know, actual parenting than creating more tools for parents to allow PC be the nanny and continue ignoring their children. Such laws already exist in many countries and are one of the most fucked up things in existence.

but I think you're taking it a bit far. If anything, such parental tools are putting the responsibility in the parent's hands.

how is a tool which is meant for restriction are going to teach children responsibility? all this does is allow parents to make PC do their parenting without needing to do actual parenting.

I agree with you, but you have to admit that it's impossible to stop lazy parenting, so it's better that they have this tool rather than not. It's not like a PC gaming kid won't figure out how to bypass it anyway.

Strazdas:

Ken Sapp:

Strazdas:
Well, steam is making a tool for parents to restrict their children it seems. Because blocking off information is always easier than teaching children to be responsible. Always blame everyone but the parent. always.

How is this putting the blame on everyone but parents? It is allowing parents to restrict the games their children have access to without having to hover over their children's shoulders at all times. Parents should talk to their children and teach them to be responsible, but creating tools to enforce the word of law helps to remove the temptation to bend the rules when the supervisory units aren't standing watch directly over the kids. Most children, even the most obedient, will try to bend the rules just to see what they can get away with especially when the popular thing is what is not allowed to them.

It is a system which in is essence is restricting children from unvanted content by locking them out, implying that lack of this system is the reason kids wanted to play these games. A good parent teaches and explains, not deny acess. IF you are a good parent your child will be able to determine whether he wants to play certain game or not, removing the need for age restriction to begin with.

You seem to be working on the assumption that children are completely logical and rational beings that never do stupid things against their better knowledge...

That doesn't even go for adults. I'm sorry, but explaining to a child he needs to go to bed at 9pm to get enough rest for school without actually sending him up to bed isn't going to end well in most cases. There's a decent chance he'll take your explanation for truth and plan to go to bed on time, although that's certainly no guarantee. But he'll just watch one more TV-show before doing so. And then just a single one more after that. And well, since it's already past time, it wouldn't hurt much to watch a single one more after that right? And hey, at this point you won't get enough sleep anyway so might as well watch that other cool show coming up.

A child's brain is still very much in development and lacks cognition regarding long-term consequences. You can't expect them to behave exactly as an adult, that's what makes them children. You can't teach and explain everything right away, there's a development children need to go through. Some things come much later in that track and until that time you deny them access to it.

l3o2828:
So, instead of the gritty and dark grey layout it's going to be Pyro Vision at all times? :D
Please tell me it's that!

It's parental control, but having a pyro vision colored layout would be nice (btw big picture is more blue/gray). I guess it is in preparation of steambox, has currently steam condition require to be 13+ for an account, if I am not mistaken.

Doom972:
I agree with you, but you have to admit that it's impossible to stop lazy parenting, so it's better that they have this tool rather than not. It's not like a PC gaming kid won't figure out how to bypass it anyway.

Yes, defeating lazy parenting is impossible in current conditions. However i would not like to encourage lazy parenting by giving them the tool where many parents could abuse it to extreme situations.

Hagi:

You seem to be working on the assumption that children are completely logical and rational beings that never do stupid things against their better knowledge...

That doesn't even go for adults. I'm sorry, but explaining to a child he needs to go to bed at 9pm to get enough rest for school without actually sending him up to bed isn't going to end well in most cases. There's a decent chance he'll take your explanation for truth and plan to go to bed on time, although that's certainly no guarantee. But he'll just watch one more TV-show before doing so. And then just a single one more after that. And well, since it's already past time, it wouldn't hurt much to watch a single one more after that right? And hey, at this point you won't get enough sleep anyway so might as well watch that other cool show coming up.

A child's brain is still very much in development and lacks cognition regarding long-term consequences. You can't expect them to behave exactly as an adult, that's what makes them children. You can't teach and explain everything right away, there's a development children need to go through. Some things come much later in that track and until that time you deny them access to it.

Children, like all humans, are logical. Their logic is different basedo n thier perspective however. Rationality is something that is parents responsibility to teach, it does not magically apear on thier own. you did touch the elephant in the room. they do things because of their lack of knowledge. and this is poor excuse to treat them as lesser beings. instead we should try to increase such knowledge. giving a parent a tool that can just make a roadblock to certain games is not giving any such knowledge.
If your explanation ends with "you need enough rest" of course it wont end well. though lets not pretend thats an example of good parenting.
A child's brain is still developing, however at the age when we let childrens use PCs and they know how to go around playing steam games, a child is old enough to understand long-term consequences. problem is - most parents never tell him that. in fact, most parents dont even know. there are still many parents including mine that throw phrases like "rotting in front of PC" because they consider it some evil deed.
Of course you cant explain everything right away. thats why you have, you know, 18 years to teach him. however most parents just imagine that they should "let the child grow up" without actually teaching him anything.
When you deny acess you have to explain it in such a way that the child would understand, and not just say "this is bad" because thats never going to teach him anything.

Capcha: win hands down.
first it calls me idiot, now it tells me im winning.

Strazdas:
IF you are a good parent your child will be able to determine whether he wants to play certain game or not, removing the need for age restriction to begin with.

Tell me, how many children do you have? And if you have children, do you also work? Because no matter how good a parent you are, it's not reasonable to assume you're constantly watching over your kid's shoulder. And considering how important computers are for schoolwork and such these days just not letting a kid to use a computer at all or under supervision has its problems.

It's not even a matter of letting a kid choose if they want to play a game, it's making sure they don't stumble upon something they weren't ready for.

This is the complete opposite of absolving parents of responsibility, it's giving them more tools to let their kids play games responsibly.

Strazdas:

Doom972:
I agree with you, but you have to admit that it's impossible to stop lazy parenting, so it's better that they have this tool rather than not. It's not like a PC gaming kid won't figure out how to bypass it anyway.

Yes, defeating lazy parenting is impossible in current conditions. However i would not like to encourage lazy parenting by giving them the tool where many parents could abuse it to extreme situations.

Parents already could just take away the computer from the kid and not let them play any games. Or not let them have Steam.

Features like these are great. However, many parents either don't care or are too technology-illiterate to activate something like this. But at least some may find good use for this.
I once configured parental controls in Windows Vista and it was pretty horrible, would let some stuff through that clearly needed filtering, blocked legitimate content and constantly asked for the password even for operations that didn't need checking. And I'm normally pretty good with setting up and configuring...

I also wonder which rating system it will rely on. For example, the German USK rating and the US-ratings can be pretty different with violence and nudity/sexuality often being rated very differently.
So how is it applied? Do the parents decide which system to use? Or is it based on which Steam servers you are connected to? In that case it could be circumvented by choosing a server in other countries.

I think this might be a very useful tool for households in which parents can't be at home much. I just wish they let parents choose, one by one, the games their children are allowed to play.
Sometimes it's fine to let your kids play something above their age rating for a change.

Lieju:

Strazdas:
IF you are a good parent your child will be able to determine whether he wants to play certain game or not, removing the need for age restriction to begin with.

Tell me, how many children do you have? And if you have children, do you also work? Because no matter how good a parent you are, it's not reasonable to assume you're constantly watching over your kid's shoulder. And considering how important computers are for schoolwork and such these days just not letting a kid to use a computer at all or under supervision has its problems.

It's not even a matter of letting a kid choose if they want to play a game, it's making sure they don't stumble upon something they weren't ready for.

This is the complete opposite of absolving parents of responsibility, it's giving them more tools to let their kids play games responsibly.

Strazdas:

Doom972:
I agree with you, but you have to admit that it's impossible to stop lazy parenting, so it's better that they have this tool rather than not. It's not like a PC gaming kid won't figure out how to bypass it anyway.

Yes, defeating lazy parenting is impossible in current conditions. However i would not like to encourage lazy parenting by giving them the tool where many parents could abuse it to extreme situations.

Parents already could just take away the computer from the kid and not let them play any games. Or not let them have Steam.

Its not reasonable to assume you constantly need to watch over your kids shoulder. And i never said i wouldnt let a kid use computer, now did i? Or are you going on assumptions again?
Werent ready for? you mean you failed to prepare them for?
<...>
Yes, parents can already do that and it only serves to illustrate the point of how silly it is to begin with.

So does this mean we'll also be getting allowed to have multiple profiles on a single steam account? I really would like to have my son stop earning my achievements.

BiH-Kira:
I would like a "family mode" where I could play a game from my profile on my PC and my brother play another game from the same profile on his laptop. A game can only be played by one person at a time.

It makes no sense that we would need to buy the same game 2 times.

Well, you already need to buy two copies if you're doing that on console (splitscreen aside).
I'm against most forms of DRM, but that restriction is, imo, reasonable. You can always get bundles of the game for a discount which is in fact better than on console.

What would be good would be if you could permanently disassociate a particular game from your account. That way you'd lose access to the game, but could sell it or trade it in without restriction.
It would only work for physical copies like the Orange Box and Total War and stuff, but would be a really good feature.

-------
OT, this is probably a good idea. It'll give parents peace of mind, and mean that 10 year olds who've got Steam for a sports game won't stumble upon Hotline Miami or whatever.

I've always thought that it's daft that you have to enter DOB to view some trailers on the Steam Store, but can buy and play anything without restriction.

Strazdas:
When you deny acess you have to explain it in such a way that the child would understand, and not just say "this is bad" because thats never going to teach him anything.

So what's so bad about this Steam functionality then? If denying access is fine as long as you give a proper explanation then what's the issue?

Did I miss a ' You can't explain to your kid why you block their game, you are only allowed to laugh maniacally' clause somewhere?

I just don't see how it's this evil restricting of information you're making it out to be. Restricting information from children and providing the tools to do so isn't in any way inherently bad, it's all a matter of allowing access at the right time when and only when you've taught the child sufficient skills to deal with it.

There's absolutely nothing wrong with these tools. They can certainly be used by lazy and bad parents to bad ends, but that's the parent's fault. They can also be used for perfectly good purposes, it's perfectly reasonably to block access to your horror games when you have a very curious child who's prone to nightmares. It's also perfectly reasonable to block access to all games at certain hours or after certain hours played when you have a child prone to losing track of time and you have other responsibilities that prevent you from monitoring your child at all times.

Just because you have bad experiences with your own parents restricting your access to games for no reason beyond their own prejudice doesn't mean that that somehow makes these tools at fault or those providing them. It's the parent's responsibility on how they use these tools and as long as there are reasonable and justified uses for them there's no wrong in providing such tools.

LoL! Now Steam is even becoming the better console!

Still waiting for my 'sell used games' mode and 'take up less system resources' mode Valve.

Strazdas:
Well, steam is making a tool for parents to restrict their children it seems. Because blocking off information is always easier than teaching children to be responsible. Always blame everyone but the parent. always.

Children will ALWAYS find a way to be irresponsible ;)

Hagi:

Strazdas:
When you deny acess you have to explain it in such a way that the child would understand, and not just say "this is bad" because thats never going to teach him anything.

So what's so bad about this Steam functionality then? If denying access is fine as long as you give a proper explanation then what's the issue?

Did I miss a ' You can't explain to your kid why you block their game, you are only allowed to laugh maniacally' clause somewhere?

I just don't see how it's this evil restricting of information you're making it out to be. Restricting information from children and providing the tools to do so isn't in any way inherently bad, it's all a matter of allowing access at the right time when and only when you've taught the child sufficient skills to deal with it.

There's absolutely nothing wrong with these tools. They can certainly be used by lazy and bad parents to bad ends, but that's the parent's fault. They can also be used for perfectly good purposes, it's perfectly reasonably to block access to your horror games when you have a very curious child who's prone to nightmares. It's also perfectly reasonable to block access to all games at certain hours or after certain hours played when you have a child prone to losing track of time and you have other responsibilities that prevent you from monitoring your child at all times.

Just because you have bad experiences with your own parents restricting your access to games for no reason beyond their own prejudice doesn't mean that that somehow makes these tools at fault or those providing them. It's the parent's responsibility on how they use these tools and as long as there are reasonable and justified uses for them there's no wrong in providing such tools.

ability to abuse. Steam does not ask you to explain your kids it properly. it lets you just to block it. and thus we will have once again same situation where "you cant because i said so" being the majority of parenting.
Restricting information tools would be good if everyone was responsbile. Since they arent, we are left with slightly orwelian view.

Granted my experience with "all children" is limited, but i always saw that children that are prone to nightmares explicitly said no when i offerend them to watch a horror movie with me. thats becasue they understood the relation between horror movies and their imagination. And not to mention that there is no real direct correlation anyway, children who never saw horror movies had nightmares and those that did hadnt and so on.
As for hour limiter, as long as its not abused to "i think you sit there too long". You should restrict time spent if this hampers his other duties. you should not force him to change a hobby just because you dont like gaming though.
We have ISP providing a internet acess limiting tool to parents. pretty much everyone i know of that age frame suffers from the consequences of abusing such system.
maybe our culture just sucks too much to trust people to not abuse this.

Strazdas:

Werent ready for? you mean you failed to prepare them for?
<...>

Yes, because all entertainment is the same and your 7-year olds should be immediately prepared for all the R-rated stuff.

Strazdas:

Yes, parents can already do that and it only serves to illustrate the point of how silly it is to begin with.

Your argument was that parents shouldn't have this option because they would abuse it. But if they want to monitor their kids' gaming or stop them from doing it they can do it. But isn't it a better option for them to do it with parental controls like this, instead of taking away the computer alltogether?

You didn't answer me. Do you have kids or indeed have you looked after children ever? How old are you? (EDIT: according to your bio you are old enough to possibly have children, though.)
Because you seem to have some rather unrealistic expectations about parenting.

How do you think children should be 'prepared', and how would you monitor their entertainment, if at all?
At what age would you give them access to the computer? (Because according to your logic they should at that age be ready for anything they find in the Internet.)

Strazdas:

Children, like all humans, are logical.

You are not from planet Earth. Children are the most irrational and illogical naturally occurring creatures that exist.

Strazdas:
ability to abuse. Steam does not ask you to explain your kids it properly. it lets you just to block it. and thus we will have once again same situation where "you cant because i said so" being the majority of parenting.
Restricting information tools would be good if everyone was responsbile. Since they arent, we are left with slightly orwelian view.

Granted my experience with "all children" is limited, but i always saw that children that are prone to nightmares explicitly said no when i offerend them to watch a horror movie with me. thats becasue they understood the relation between horror movies and their imagination. And not to mention that there is no real direct correlation anyway, children who never saw horror movies had nightmares and those that did hadnt and so on.
As for hour limiter, as long as its not abused to "i think you sit there too long". You should restrict time spent if this hampers his other duties. you should not force him to change a hobby just because you dont like gaming though.
We have ISP providing a internet acess limiting tool to parents. pretty much everyone i know of that age frame suffers from the consequences of abusing such system.
maybe our culture just sucks too much to trust people to not abuse this.

You can abuse quite literally everything, that's no excuse at all. I could club you to death with my laptop, doesn't make laptops bad. Just makes me a rather messed up individual.

What needs to be looked at if there are legitimate uses and, if so, if they outweigh possible abuses. Here we're talking about an account, managed by parents and thus in all likelihood paid for, getting tools to restrict access to that account. As has been mentioned every possible abuse with this system can already be done by parents, they already have the power to completely take away a child's computer, any video games he or she possesses and any money he or she can use to buy them. As such this system adds no new possible abuses, every wrong you can do with it a parent can also do without it.

As I've said there are legitimate uses for it. The children you personally know that have nightmares may be wise enough to avoid horror materials but that's not all children. If you're looking for a real example I could point you at my younger brother. When he was much younger he was very prone to nightmares, yet whenever confronted with a horror movie he'd watch it to prove to those around him that he wasn't afraid. By now he's grown up and wise enough to not do stuff like that anymore, but as I said, children do stupid shit even when they've been given good explanations as to why not. Some mistakes just have to be made and experienced to learn from, and it's up to a parent to ensure those mistakes occur only when a child's learned the tools to deal with said mistakes. Until then access should be restricted.

As for your correlation erm... babbling it is I guess. That doesn't make any sense, it doesn't work like that. Correlation doesn't mean something is the only cause. A power outage definitely has a correlation to electrical devices shutting down, that doesn't mean that it's the only reason devices shut down or that when it occurs all electrical devices shut down ( some might have internal batteries ). It in fact, like horror and nightmares, has more than correlation it has causation. Likewise horror movies can certainly cause nightmares, which doesn't mean they always cause them and that nightmares are always caused by them. It just means they can cause them.

This system only gives new options, it gives good parents the option to be much more selective in what to restrict and what not to restrict. Instead of taking away an entire computer they can now take away only a single game, still allowing everything else. It doesn't give any new abuses, parents already had the power to take away a game by simply taking away an entire computer, a child's allowance and various other means. There's nothing wrong with this system. There's only something wrong with the parents who abuse it.

I have to wonder how this would tie in with Steam's SSA since officially account sharing is not allowed.

Nothing, absolutely nothing about having the ability to limit access to your Steam account for kids or other family members impedes your ability to still be a good parent. It's an additional feature, nothing more, and I really don't see why there is even any debate about that.

Is the fact that a "because I said so" attitude of parenting is becoming more prominent, especially amongst younger parents, worrying? Yes, it is.

Does a good parent reason with their child and work *with* them to teach them what's right and wrong? You bet.

Does that have anything to do with steam adding this feature? No. Not. At. All.

Wow, that negative reaction was unexpected. In a time when we as gamers are being blamed constantly rather than parents being given responsibility, I would have thought Valve making parents responsible would have been a massively positive thing. It means that publishers and devs can no longer be held accountable, no parents have more tools to limit what their children have access to.

But no, maybe people here just require something to bitch about either way?

rofltehcat:
Features like these are great. However, many parents either don't care or are too technology-illiterate to activate something like this. But at least some may find good use for this.
I once configured parental controls in Windows Vista and it was pretty horrible, would let some stuff through that clearly needed filtering, blocked legitimate content and constantly asked for the password even for operations that didn't need checking. And I'm normally pretty good with setting up and configuring...

I also wonder which rating system it will rely on. For example, the German USK rating and the US-ratings can be pretty different with violence and nudity/sexuality often being rated very differently.
So how is it applied? Do the parents decide which system to use? Or is it based on which Steam servers you are connected to? In that case it could be circumvented by choosing a server in other countries.

1. Everyone knows that Microsoft and proprietary Microsoft "software" is garbage and that it's only being held up by habit. Most virus blockers have parental blockers built-in; I use Kaspersky, and I've had success with it, though it IS easier to get around than most parental software.

2. Base it off of which servers you're connected to and make changing servers PIN protected? Assuming they think of that, of course.

Smertnik:
I have to wonder how this would tie in with Steam's SSA since officially account sharing is not allowed.

You label the entire account a "kid account", and the PIN is there to prevent them from circumventing the childblocks, stopping them from spending your money (since Steam saves your credit card info), and whatever else you can think of?

uncanny474:

You label the entire account a "kid account", and the PIN is there to prevent them from circumventing the childblocks, stopping them from spending your money (since Steam saves your credit card info), and whatever else you can think of?

Fair enough. Although the spending money part is easily avoidable by either buying games from another Steam account or deleting cc information after a purchase (or not using a cc in the first place).

What ever happened to responsible parenting in this world, especially the developed countries?

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