Chrome Browser Games Support Offline Mode

Chrome Browser Games Support Offline Mode

A new generation of Chrome apps work as desktop apps with offline mode and local storage.

Five years ago, Google Chrome began as one of the new web browsers. Since then, Google has been adding more and more to the browser to keep up with the changing nature of technology - primarily, apps. In an announcement on the blog for Google Chrome, the company stated it was unveiling the new Chrome App system for Windows, with Mac and Linux versions coming soon.

Desktop Chrome Apps are accessed from an app launcher in the Windows taskbar to "get into the app without being distracted by the rest of the web." The apps also sync to devices to pick up where you left off when opening the app the next time. Apps have security features that auto-update so users don't need to remember to update on their own.

Most exciting, however, is the ability for game developers to create browser games that work even when not connected to the internet, and save files are stored locally. No more screaming at your internet provider when the internet and your game suddenly crash.

To celebrate the release of the new Chrome App, Google published a collection of "For Your Desktop" apps on Chrome's web store, including games like Spelunky, Cracking Sands Racing, and Tank Riders. Spelunky, an HTML5 game is a cave exploration game inspired by classic platformers. Cracking Sands Racing is - no surprise - a racing game, but with guns. Tank Riders is a tank battle system with multiplayer options coming soon. All three are available for free on the Chrome web store.

Source: Google Chrome blog via Develop

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So basicly they made the apps like downloadable programs, right?

This is something that should have been made in the first place when they thought about creating apps.

So instead of the "always online" future some of the companies like to talk about, we get BROWSER games that can work without an internet connection. That's awesome.

I really like this, but Google is starting to scare me. So, uh, nice job, Google, but can you please stop spying on me?

Umm...they were already able to do all these things with Chrome apps. They could work offline (https://chrome.google.com/webstore/category/collection/offline_enabled), and if you made a desktop shortcut to that app, it would open right to it. They made a point of talking about this when they were using free Angry Birds to get people to switch to Chrome (http://www.escapistmagazine.com/news/view/109960-Rovio-Adds-Browser-Game-To-Angry-Birds-Empire).

This announcement is more about offering new APIs to developers so ChromeOS might be useful someday.

josemlopes:
So basicly they made the apps like downloadable programs, right?

This is something that should have been made in the first place when they thought about creating apps.

It really should have been, but at least they're doing it now.

I suppose what I'm saying in this case is "better late than never."

mechalynx:
I really like this, but Google is starting to scare me. So, uh, nice job, Google, but can you please stop spying on me?

We are not spying on...Errr...I mean, I agree!

I like Google services, but I'm not a fan of their omnipresence.

Web Apps have been available offline since the very first web app.

What this has done is simply another step in a long-running effort from Google to make Web Apps increasingly indistinguishable from Native Apps as well as providing better integration with Google's other services.

mechalynx:
I really like this, but Google is starting to scare me. So, uh, nice job, Google, but can you please stop spying on me?

Why not just use chromium?

And isn't this just like a polished version of saving an old flash swf but for the new age?

 

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