Valve Reveals SteamOS

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Laughing Man:

Also, you're not a soothsayer. SteamOS is much more game-oriented than Windows, and it's fully possible it'll eclipse Windows in use by gamers.

The only way it would eclipse Windows is if developers start creating games for it, their seems to be a fallacy amongst the majority that if Valve makes it they will come, variants of Linux and it's ilk that can run games have been about for a good amount of time and their are still hardly any major developers using it or for that matter dual releasing on Windows alongside Linux.

MS don't charge for developers to create games on their OS, the tools and development kits for DX are out there, free to download and use and more importantly they are well developed, so given that the vast majority of the titles that use Steam will still require a Windows powered PC running to work, alongside the fact that which ever way you slice it the OS Steam will be releasing will still be new and subject to all the issues and development that goes with a new OS combined with the fact that after ten years Steam itself is still one of the slowest, bloat filled nonsense gaming clients that you can get, where exactly in all this is the proven skill set that Valve have got the chops to take on the Windows gaming market yet alone making it so big that they will force developers away from Windows to their own OS?

The real question is now that Valve have announced this, what are the reactions from the people who actually develop games? Have any big names come forward and expressed even the slightest interest? I haven't found anything yet.

Well, they announced it less than three hours ago. Give them a minute.

Also, if this OS has the VM capacity to run the majority of its Steam library, as it promises, then all your reservations are kind of moot, because Valve does all the work.

People here don't know how to fuckin' read. To all those skeptics asking if they'll be able to run their DirectX games, read this part:

In-home Streaming

You can play all your Windows and Mac games on your SteamOS machine, too. Just turn on your existing computer and run Steam as you always have - then your SteamOS machine can stream those games over your home network straight to your TV!

That sounds pretty straightforward to me.

heh my current setup is a home theater pc with a pretty case in the living room, and a ginormous full tower game box in the next room with cables going through the wall to the TV (and a usb hub an an adapted ethernet cable next to the couch for controllers, wireless sucks)

with this I could i could connect both devices to the same "start" screen rather than behind different TV inputs

the future is awesome!

lacktheknack:
Also, if this OS has the VM capacity to run the majority of its Steam library, as it promises, then all your reservations are kind of moot, because Valve does all the work.

There's nothing relating to VM. You still need a Windows system on the LAN to actually run and render the games.

miker00lz:

lacktheknack:
Also, if this OS has the VM capacity to run the majority of its Steam library, as it promises, then all your reservations are kind of moot, because Valve does all the work.

There's nothing relating to VM. You still need a Windows system on the LAN to actually run and render the games.

You're right, I got completely mixed up. :D

Streaming is a good first step, if nothing else. It could lead to more.

lacktheknack:
I can't wait to hear Richard Stallman's response to this! I can hear the weeping and voodoo-stabbing already! :D

RMS! That magnificent bastard. He's like a cross between the best of Molyneux, some Gandhi, a tad of your craziest uncle drunk in new year's eve and too much flower power. Batshit crazy, reaching for unattainable goals and almost always losing, but fighting the good fight.

I would buy him a drink but would first try to count the grains of sand in the desert than join his crusade.

Vivi22:

I think your concerns are completely unfounded. Firstly, Valve isn't even close to being in a monopolistic position. In fact, so long as other OS's continue to exist (which they will) and the PC platform stays open (which it pretty much will), they'll never be able to abuse their position in the way a company like Microsoft used to try and do because there are always going to be other companies and competitors ready to stick the knife in and give it a good twist should Valve ever betray their customers trust to any large degree.

Second, there's absolutely no reason to believe that releasing on SteamOS would require people to use Steam as their distribution platform. Valve has been extremely vocal about the need to keep the PC platform open, and is one of the biggest criticisms they had of Windows 8. Is it possible that they could make it a closed system with Steam required? Sure. Would it work? Not in a million years. They're not going to get this OS on millions of machines by making it closed off.

Now see...stop that. Just stop.

You're using logic and making sense. The two biggest hurdles between us (the forum users) and a good Valve bashing.

Stop ruining our witch hunt, damn it! If you keep pointing out the obvious and punching holes in our irrational concerns how are we ever going to continue berating Valve and it's fans?

You're just mean...

Adam Jensen:
People here don't know how to fuckin' read. To all those skeptics asking if they'll be able to run their DirectX games, read this part:

In-home Streaming

You can play all your Windows and Mac games on your SteamOS machine, too. Just turn on your existing computer and run Steam as you always have - then your SteamOS machine can stream those games over your home network straight to your TV!

That sounds pretty straightforward to me.

Didn't seem all that clear to me, mainly because they say "existing computer" and then "your SteamOS machine" as if they're different pieces of hardware. Reading it again 3 different times I understood it but at first it sounded like something else.

Adam Jensen:
People here don't know how to fuckin' read. To all those skeptics asking if they'll be able to run their DirectX games, read this part:

In-home Streaming

You can play all your Windows and Mac games on your SteamOS machine, too. Just turn on your existing computer and run Steam as you always have - then your SteamOS machine can stream those games over your home network straight to your TV!

That sounds pretty straightforward to me.

And, not only that (and one wonders if the SteamOS can stream over VPNs as well) but it's a straightforward, open (and free) OS. So, should push come to shove, you can just dual boot on your machine. A process that is as easy as it gets with PCs.

I think one of the most interesting parts is their announcement all the way near the bottom in which they tease that some AAA titles in 2014 will be released on it. At least this is how I understand it.

They might go for the streaming thing first, then slowly hemorrhage players away from Windows to somewhen be an actual stand alone alternative.

But can I install origin on it?

Wait, why would I ever want a second machine to stream my games to for my tv? Can't I just stream directly to the tv these days? Or push come to shove, use an HDMI cable and the tv as a monitor?

I'm not saying the OS doesn't have other appealing aspects, but wouldn't mind if someone could explain the point of that particular aspect.

I'm surprised. And impressed! If they manage to get the delay down enough for the streaming, this is the kind of product I would buy. Being able to have my PC standing in my room, while also being able to play it on a livingroom TV sounds really tempting.

Yea i'm not seeing any benefits that I benefit from.
If one of the best "new features" is streaming your games to our TVs...I have n HDMI cable for a reason, I can already do that.

And as simply as that, Linux graphic driver problem has been solved.

I'm a little disappointed. Was hoping for a real, standalone Linux distribution...not this sort of "hijack Windows" parasite.

This has potential. The SteamOS gives devs a fixed target when developing for linux and so will likely make releasing linux versions of games easier.

I think MS is now starting to sweat a little that their dominance is cracking.

I trust Valve will get most of my games library working in the first version, my primary worry is my steadily expanding GOG library remaining compatible. I know I sound ungrateful for a free OS and complete compatibility perfection in the same package is asking for way too much.

Thus I'll await for some people to post a youtube video on how to do a good Win7 to SteamOS migration.

rofltehcat:

It sounds kinda like a Xbone without the games.

Actually, it sounds more like the PS4's streaming service without the PS4. Which is a little less absurd, but still not my first choice.

But I hope this will work out fine, they might just inspire developers to port to their system and then getting rid of Windows would actually be an option.

It'd be nice to see an option come to rival Windows. Not sure how likely that is, but still.

If this means you can stream Steam to your big screen television, commonly in the living room. This means the Steam lovers will either have to buy a special table to rest their keyboard and mouse on while they sit on the couch or use... *GASP* a controller!

Wait problem solved.
image

It's a bit putting the cart before the horse here.

If Valve wants PC gaming to shift off Windows and on to Linux then it needs to lead the charge and provide incentives for doing so. It most certainly isn't going to be an overnight ordeal and could take at least an entire generation of gaming to finally see come to light.

The only question is what do developers get out of designing games to be Linux compatible?

Crazy Zaul:
WTF is a 'living room machine'? The info from Valve is so completely vague it tells you pretty much nothing. It seems like all this really does is stream your PC to the living room TV and they have just re-branded the idea of a 'Steam Box' to call it an OS.

...a living room machine is just a home theater PC. Everyone I know who has a big-screen TV in their living room has one, usually a micro-ATX or mini-ITX tower running a low-end desktop APU... and usually built by me (usually for around $300). They're a lot better for putting internet video on your TV than some locked-architecture PowerPC processor-running POS (they also function as a replacement for a blu-ray player... and they play basic games, store and display photos, et cetera), and this way you don't need to take your dedicated gaming rig out of its traditional desk-borne habitat (also, you don't need to make room for a gigantic PC tower in your entertainment center).

Pretty sure the Steam Box thing is forthcoming. They just announced the OS so we know we can put it on our existing machines.

I fail to see why i'd use this, windows is too critical to everything, and generally innocuous in its operation, so i'm not gonna dual boot just to play games on linux. So that leaves steam os as a htpc os and streaming device for my windows tower.
Again i don't think anyone would run or dualboot a crippled OS on their main tower, so steam os becomes this sort of sideshowthing where its only useful if you have an htpc and want to stream a game to your TV.. it seems very niche. I'd rather they just to an app to mirror my pc on my tv with little latency

I'm excited and hopeful to see where this goes.

As long as Steam doesn't become exclusive to this, then cool. More options for people is a good thing, not like they have the monopoly on PC and this doesn't change that like some people seem to think, as a PC can whatever OS you want on it etc.

Jadak:
Wait, why would I ever want a second machine to stream my games to for my tv? Can't I just stream directly to the tv these days? Or push come to shove, use an HDMI cable and the tv as a monitor?

I'm not saying the OS doesn't have other appealing aspects, but wouldn't mind if someone could explain the point of that particular aspect.

Because, depending on your setup, doing that can be more trouble than it's worth. For one, I don't think most people have TVs that you can do the direct streaming thing, and trying to move a big desktop over so that I can hook my 5 foot HDMI cable to it is a huge pain in the ass. Plus, from my understanding, most wireless controllers take some finnicking to get working right on PC, and trying to use most wired PC controllers, which generally have fairly short cables, when you're trying to play games on a tv just sucks.

I understand that some people have setups that work really well for playing PC games on a TV, but I would be willing to bet that most people don't.

Anyway, I think that early 2014 would probably be the best time to launch some sort of Steambox thing (which is definitely happening at this point, and the SteamOS announcement is basically a prelude to that) if they want to compete with the console market. Most people aren't going to want to get consoles from this generation for a variety of reasons, so they just have to compete with the next gen consoles. The fact that the PS4 and Xbone are going to be pretty expensive means that pricing themselves out of the competition is going to be less of an issue. And the biggest weakness of new consoles is that they have a very limited library of games, which Valve seems to be addressing (although we don't yet know if it will be enough).

Of course, for this to actually compete with the console market in any serious way, Valve needs to do a lot to market this thing, especially to people that don't pay that much attention to the gaming scene, and they need to have a lot of games running natively on the thing, not just streaming. Both of which are things that we have no idea if they're going to happen or not.

Adam Jensen:
People here don't know how to fuckin' read. To all those skeptics asking if they'll be able to run their DirectX games, read this part:

In-home Streaming

You can play all your Windows and Mac games on your SteamOS machine, too. Just turn on your existing computer and run Steam as you always have - then your SteamOS machine can stream those games over your home network straight to your TV!

That sounds pretty straightforward to me.

It still looks to me like a workaround rather than a proper solution to the problem. It's still a great first step, but I really hope the the SteamBox won't need a powerhouse middleman to play the majority of my games forever. Then again, the announcement pretty much admits that they haven't got some details sussed and they're working on it, so hopefully they'll let the Box work standalone in the future.

Well, they announced it less than three hours ago. Give them a minute.

Yes you're right, the reality is this won't change a thing. End of the day it will just become another Linux Distro used by a minor number of people who will continue to dual boot with whatever version of Windows they choose to use. You'll have the die hards who will talk it up like it's the best thing they have ever used, you'll have their opposite number who think it's just a pointless waste of time (I guess I sit in that camp) and then you'll have the vast majority who will just want whatever is the easiest thing to use and end of the day that will be the Windows powered system.

As for the Steambox itself, well to be honest having the VP of one company spend several months moaning about a rival and then have them release a piece of hardware that fundamentally requires the services of the company that he has just spent all this time complaining about to work fully, it's not what wins respect.

I am very interested to see how the "SteamBox" and "SteamOS" compete with the coming generation of console gaming. The freedom of both the OS and hardware could mean a more flexible and affordable way for you to game in your living room. I know there are already PC builds out there that accomplish this, but having a dedicated OS in place could simplify the process and really compete with Microsoft and Sony.

So, basically it's Linux, associated with Steam, and made for public consumption of every-day people?

Ok, maybe I'm extremely thick, but I'm not following what it's supposed to do. Can anyone explain it?

SinisterGehe:

I think the steam box should give all notifications as Glados.... Like when you boot to desktop "Oh it is you... again..."

I think I need to dual boot my Gaming laptop also. I said to myself- nei! I promised that I will never go linux until I need to (Because my expensive applications for work aren't supported or support any form of linux).
Also the idea of using command line to find things took my taste away. (I know they have desktops but all the linux freaks say that the command line is better)
But if this turns out well and 80% of steam games work on it then I will go for it properly on gaming laptop and just get myself a better and newer workhorse.

Just to inform you regarding the command line issue. To say you don't like it because of command line and because "it's better" as an excuse means you should stop using windows because using it's command line (cmd) is better too. That is to say, they like to just type commands weather its Linux or Windows. As far as using it with GUI like normal windows Linux can do it just as well as OSX and Windows, if not better.

aattss:
So, basically it's Linux, associated with Steam, and made for public consumption of every-day people?

Thats what it looks like, we need more information to say much beyond that.

Laughing Man:

Well, they announced it less than three hours ago. Give them a minute.

Yes you're right, the reality is this won't change a thing. End of the day it will just become another Linux Distro used by a minor number of people who will continue to dual boot with whatever version of Windows they choose to use. You'll have the die hards who will talk it up like it's the best thing they have ever used, you'll have their opposite number who think it's just a pointless waste of time (I guess I sit in that camp) and then you'll have the vast majority who will just want whatever is the easiest thing to use and end of the day that will be the Windows powered system.

As for the Steambox itself, well to be honest having the VP of one company spend several months moaning about a rival and then have them release a piece of hardware that fundamentally requires the services of the company that he has just spent all this time complaining about to work fully, it's not what wins respect.

A free boost in performance, framerate, graphics, loading times and input response time is never a waste of time. Windows is not a gaming-dedicated OS.

ReleGamer:
I am very interested to see how the "SteamBox" and "SteamOS" compete with the coming generation of console gaming. The freedom of both the OS and hardware could mean a more flexible and affordable way for you to game in your living room. I know there are already PC builds out there that accomplish this, but having a dedicated OS in place could simplify the process and really compete with Microsoft and Sony.

What I am really curious about is what market is really going to adapt to something like a SteamBox/SteamOS for I remember the outcry against Microsoft with the features they were talking about with the Xbox One with requiring online handshakes every 24 hours, the ability not to resell games, unable to give a friend your copy of a game, less emphasis on disk based content making it more digital. All those concerns are what Steam is about and I can't see a person who has a console is going to be interested in those features when they were abandoning Microsoft when they mentioned they were included. Maybe I am reading it wrong.

Personally I have a HTPC setup using a desktop case already so I don't have any need to stream my games from my Windows PC to a box sitting under my TV so something like this isn't for me. If they are able to solve the DirectX/OpenGL limitations of Linux and getting more developers to make their games compatible with Linux I will have more interest in giving it a try for really gaming is the reason why I use a Windows based PC right now.

I wonder if its going to see a 3.0 version before it goes to ground for 7 years.

My opinion is it looks good if they can deliver all the features promised now i got to see if i want to invest in one for my new place next year.

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