Microsoft Is Playing Halo 4 On Windows Phones

Microsoft Is Playing Halo 4 On Windows Phones

Halo 4 - Screen 10

Microsoft has some kind of streaming service in the works, and reports say the prototype is already providing smooth gameplay on smartphones.

Streaming games is a pretty big deal these days. Between Sony's Gaikai technology and Valve's new SteamOS, Microsoft is starting to feel left out - but not for much longer. Microsoft demoed a prototype streaming service at an internal company meeting, which reportedly involved smoothly streaming Halo 4 gameplay to a low-end PC and a Windows Phone. The phone (a Lumia 520) was able to play the game using an Xbox controller adaptor with latency as low as 45ms, so this prototype might be further along than you'd think.

Microsoft officials say that this service is too early in development to discuss, as it doesn't even have a publicly-released name yet. Still, this progress on a cloud gaming service echoes some of the company's earlier statements about using streaming to provide backwards compatibility on the Xbox One. It seems Microsoft isn't sure how exactly it will put this technology to use - streaming from the cloud to devices as small as smartphones has a lot of potential applications for Microsoft's gaming businesses.

The requirement of playing a game on the same machine that's powering the game is starting to look like a thing of the past. Microsoft's goal seems to be low-latency streaming to any Windows device, which could challenge the usefulness of SteamOS if Windows-to-Xbox streaming catches on. It's far too early to say, but the cloud could be getting very crowded soon.

Source: The Verge

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How long would a phone's battery last with the wifi radio on and constantly streaming a game like Halo 4? Two hours, maybe? Would be simpler to just play the game on the console, or, make a PC port to take advantage of the higher performance they are capable of.

It's all well and good both Steam and Microsoft making streaming devices, but the battery life of phones and tablets means that serious gamers (CoD, Halo, GTA, etc multiplayers which seem to be the core of Microsoft's latest gaming push) won't adopt it.

How in the frozen wastes of Niflheim are you supposed to play an fps on a phone? Are phone controls even remotely suitable for the task? Heck wont touchscreen controls ruin the ability to see properly what's on screen? I can't imagine most will be lugging around control adapters or stuff like that. >.>

As for the cloud business, it's a pile of droppings. It might work for stuff like mmo's, but it just isn't something I'd even consider for singleplayer games. I don't want to lose my effort simply because somewhere on the line the internet went crappers. :/

Microsoft - Brings Halo 4 to a phone, refuses to bring it to PC. We supported you through iterations of Windows, helped make you successful, and now you mock us by putting a decent FPS on a phone instead of bringing it to PC. Just amazing.

The biggest question, what was the phone bill that month? The amount of data needed to stream would use up any phone data cap within hours....

Captcha: let go, indeed these idiots need to give up on streaming and focus on good games.

Chances are are even if this is half decent, it won't work in 90-95% of Australia because our internet is quite a bit behind. And with Abbot it'll stay that way....

They can call me when they have Halo 3,4, Reach and whatever the others were on Windows. I liked Halo 1 and 2, want to see the story continue.

Halyah:
How in the frozen wastes of Niflheim are you supposed to play an fps on a phone? Are phone controls even remotely suitable for the task? :/

Read the article and you might find out.

Oh, sure, you'll bring to the phone, but you won't bring it to the PC. Yeah, I love you, too, Microsoft.

GrinningCat:
Oh, sure, you'll bring to the phone, but you won't bring it to the PC. Yeah, I love you, too, Microsoft.

Last time they tried for games on the PC we ended up with the Games for Windows 'service'. Just be grateful they're leaving the PC alone.

GrinningCat:
Oh, sure, you'll bring to the phone, but you won't bring it to the PC. Yeah, I love you, too, Microsoft.

Don't worry, your not missing out on much. If Halo keeps going the direction they are going, its gonna just get worse and worse (Bungie were good at making a universe and legit good shooter, but story they sucked at. 343 are just as bad at story, but suck at pretty much everything Bungie is good at)

Cecilo:
Microsoft - Brings Halo 4 to a phone, refuses to bring it to PC. We supported you through iterations of Windows, helped make you successful, and now you mock us by putting a decent FPS on a phone instead of bringing it to PC. Just amazing.

GrinningCat:
Oh, sure, you'll bring to the phone, but you won't bring it to the PC. Yeah, I love you, too, Microsoft.

From the article :

which reportedly involved smoothly streaming Halo 4 gameplay to a low-end PC and a Windows Phone.

By the looks of things, I would guess that this will be available to PCs, Surface-tablets, Windows Phones, and Xbox One.

An interesting idea if it goes anywhere, but as this is still at the "Internal Demo" stage, I'm not going to get excited just yet. There's the real risk that by the time this becomes available, the games they have on there will be outdated.

Although if they have Xbox One games available for streaming, I would be very, very interested; as someone who isn't going to be getting the new generation of consoles, this would be perfect if it could fill the gap in games not available on PC...

9thRequiem:

Cecilo:
Microsoft - Brings Halo 4 to a phone, refuses to bring it to PC. We supported you through iterations of Windows, helped make you successful, and now you mock us by putting a decent FPS on a phone instead of bringing it to PC. Just amazing.

GrinningCat:
Oh, sure, you'll bring to the phone, but you won't bring it to the PC. Yeah, I love you, too, Microsoft.

From the article :

which reportedly involved smoothly streaming Halo 4 gameplay to a low-end PC and a Windows Phone.

By the looks of things, I would guess that this will be available to PCs, Surface-tablets, Windows Phones, and Xbox One.

An interesting idea if it goes anywhere, but as this is still at the "Internal Demo" stage, I'm not going to get excited just yet. There's the real risk that by the time this becomes available, the games they have on there will be outdated.

Although if they have Xbox One games available for streaming, I would be very, very interested; as someone who isn't going to be getting the new generation of consoles, this would be perfect if it could fill the gap in games not available on PC...

I read the article and what I took from it was cloud streaming nonsense that I don't want. Oh, sure, it can be streamed onto a low-end PC, but I don't want to take part in the cloud or streaming.

Halyah:
How in the frozen wastes of Niflheim are you supposed to play an fps on a phone? Are phone controls even remotely suitable for the task? Heck wont touchscreen controls ruin the ability to see properly what's on screen? I can't imagine most will be lugging around control adapters or stuff like that. >.>

Cecilo:
Microsoft - Brings Halo 4 to a phone, refuses to bring it to PC. We supported you through iterations of Windows, helped make you successful, and now you mock us by putting a decent FPS on a phone instead of bringing it to PC. Just amazing.

GrinningCat:
Oh, sure, you'll bring to the phone, but you won't bring it to the PC. Yeah, I love you, too, Microsoft.

Come on guys, it's right there in the actual post:

Microsoft demoed a prototype streaming service at an internal company meeting, which reportedly involved smoothly streaming Halo 4 gameplay to a low-end PC and a Windows Phone. The phone (a Lumia 520) was able to play the game using an Xbox controller adaptor with latency as low as 45ms, so this prototype might be further along than you'd think.

It's just streaming graphical output and control input over network, which is what SteamOS also wants to do. Honestly this is a good step, I'm a huge fan of more network integrated devices in a user's home and the more companies that go into this the better the technology will become for everyone when it becomes a staple of a home network.

Deshin:

Halyah:
How in the frozen wastes of Niflheim are you supposed to play an fps on a phone? Are phone controls even remotely suitable for the task? Heck wont touchscreen controls ruin the ability to see properly what's on screen? I can't imagine most will be lugging around control adapters or stuff like that. >.>

Cecilo:
Microsoft - Brings Halo 4 to a phone, refuses to bring it to PC. We supported you through iterations of Windows, helped make you successful, and now you mock us by putting a decent FPS on a phone instead of bringing it to PC. Just amazing.

GrinningCat:
Oh, sure, you'll bring to the phone, but you won't bring it to the PC. Yeah, I love you, too, Microsoft.

Come on guys, it's right there in the actual post:

Microsoft demoed a prototype streaming service at an internal company meeting, which reportedly involved smoothly streaming Halo 4 gameplay to a low-end PC and a Windows Phone. The phone (a Lumia 520) was able to play the game using an Xbox controller adaptor with latency as low as 45ms, so this prototype might be further along than you'd think.

It's just streaming graphical output and control input over network, which is what SteamOS also wants to do. Honestly this is a good step, I'm a huge fan of more network integrated devices in a user's home and the more companies that go into this the better the technology will become for everyone when it becomes a staple of a home network.

I literally just answered that very same thing a post before you. I don't care about streaming. I don't care about the cloud. I don't care about SteamOS either. I live in a rural area, so my internet gets taxed enough as it is.

Edit: Would you prefer me to say 'Oh, sure, you'll stream it to us, but you won't actually give it to us? It's pretty much the same thing as what I originally said, given this is Microsoft and they're well-known for treating PC gamers like yesterday's news.

Deshin:

Halyah:
How in the frozen wastes of Niflheim are you supposed to play an fps on a phone? Are phone controls even remotely suitable for the task? Heck wont touchscreen controls ruin the ability to see properly what's on screen? I can't imagine most will be lugging around control adapters or stuff like that. >.>

Cecilo:
Microsoft - Brings Halo 4 to a phone, refuses to bring it to PC. We supported you through iterations of Windows, helped make you successful, and now you mock us by putting a decent FPS on a phone instead of bringing it to PC. Just amazing.

GrinningCat:
Oh, sure, you'll bring to the phone, but you won't bring it to the PC. Yeah, I love you, too, Microsoft.

Come on guys, it's right there in the actual post:

Microsoft demoed a prototype streaming service at an internal company meeting, which reportedly involved smoothly streaming Halo 4 gameplay to a low-end PC and a Windows Phone. The phone (a Lumia 520) was able to play the game using an Xbox controller adaptor with latency as low as 45ms, so this prototype might be further along than you'd think.

It's just streaming graphical output and control input over network, which is what SteamOS also wants to do. Honestly this is a good step, I'm a huge fan of more network integrated devices in a user's home and the more companies that go into this the better the technology will become for everyone when it becomes a staple of a home network.

I hate to repeat what a different poster already said, but I don't care much about streaming either and consider it to be a step back in regards to singleplayer games not to mention highly detrimental to modding(how are you supposed to mod something to your hearts content if you can't even access it? Also to be specific, I'm speaking of corporate controlled streaming here, not whatever the Average Joe can use on their own machinery since that's still under their control(as in streaming from their own pc)). Plus the other thing was specifically aimed at the concept of having an fps on a phone, streaming or otherwise, given you'd have to deal with the touchscreen or drag around a controller plus an adapter.

I think you folks missed the point. It was a tech demo, not a "We're bringing Halo 4 to phones" demo. Meaning they have the tech and can stream games to mobile devices AND (if you read the fucking article) low-end PC's with minimal latency. Future of gaming? Maybe not, but it may be a relief for people who can't afford a high-end PC and still want to play games. Of course, reading comprehension is tossed out the window because its an article about Microsoft...

Seriously, people need to stop it with the knee jerk reactions to anything with "Microsoft" in it. This is good news. It's good to see the industry move forward, and low latency cloud gaming is definitely a step forward.

I always find myself with readily stable high speed internet, but a weak machine/lack of console to play high end games. So something like this doesn't sound so bad

008Zulu:
How long would a phone's battery last with the wifi radio on and constantly streaming a game like Halo 4? Two hours, maybe? Would be simpler to just play the game on the console, or, make a PC port to take advantage of the higher performance they are capable of.

It's all well and good both Steam and Microsoft making streaming devices, but the battery life of phones and tablets means that serious gamers (CoD, Halo, GTA, etc multiplayers which seem to be the core of Microsoft's latest gaming push) won't adopt it.

Yeah, I have a Lumia 822 and when playing full 3D games the battery life is <= 2 hours. compound that with a battery that is notorius for losing charge 6 months in and it will be a neat albeit useless service. Even when charging the 3D rendering tech drains it faster than it can replenish.

Since it says they've developed an adapter for Xbox controllers on phone/tablet I see this potentially finally giving the surface the gaming boost it always wanted... now just if they fixed the ability to install games on those. Streaming is becoming a big deal, but not for the young audience. It's currently more for the family man/woman who has to share screen time with hubby and kids.

Either way I consider this a good thing, if not for anything else than competition. It means a bigger push to actually make something worthwhile at cheaper prices.

Microsoft news about Halo 4?.

Microsoft mentioned in the article, hate ensues, Halo 4 not on PC since it's an exclusive, more hate ensues.

never change PC only people, never change.

GrinningCat:
I literally just answered that very same thing a post before you. I don't care about streaming. I don't care about the cloud. I don't care about SteamOS either. I live in a rural area, so my internet gets taxed enough as it is.

Edit: Would you prefer me to say 'Oh, sure, you'll stream it to us, but you won't actually give it to us? It's pretty much the same thing as what I originally said, given this is Microsoft and they're well-known for treating PC gamers like yesterday's news.

You must've posted right before I did then because I didn't see your post at all. Ok sure when you put it like that it does sound bad but I'm looking at it this way: We're able to keep past libraries of console video games alive and accessible on more than just the default devices they came on. Right now if I wanted to play Timesplitters I'd have to bust my old PS2 out. What if I don't have a PS2 anymore? What if it's broken? What if my disc is scratched and ebay doesn't have any? It's certainly not an ideal service but it's a step in the right direction imo if they manage to apply this on a very broad spectrum. Of course there're always emulators and roms to keep libraries alive that way; this is just the "legal" way of doing it and also offloading all the processing power offsite (ie: ACTUALLY using cloud computing as opposed to all their other claptrap they've said so far) if you have a node not capable of handling the emulation.

Halyah:
I hate to repeat what a different poster already said, but I don't care much about streaming either and consider it to be a step back in regards to singleplayer games not to mention highly detrimental to modding(how are you supposed to mod something to your hearts content if you can't even access it? Also to be specific, I'm speaking of corporate controlled streaming here, not whatever the Average Joe can use on their own machinery since that's still under their control(as in streaming from their own pc)). Plus the other thing was specifically aimed at the concept of having an fps on a phone, streaming or otherwise, given you'd have to deal with the touchscreen or drag around a controller plus an adapter.

1. Console games can't be modded anyway and I imagine this service is only going to apply to console games.
2. They put a FPS on a phone because it's Microsoft. They needed a game to demo and what else would they use apart from the latest Halo game? It's less "we felt this was the best use of the technology" and more "ohmahgurd its halo!!1one1"

There's no such thing as a bad movement in technology. Streaming is the current "in" thing to do right now so whatever anyone brings the table is going to be good for the medium as a whole. Sure maybe I'm just being optimistic, and maybe Microsoft will sod this up royally, but I still think this may be a good thing at the end of the day. Even if I don't want to partake of it personally I know many people will find good use out of it.

Deshin:

Halyah:
I hate to repeat what a different poster already said, but I don't care much about streaming either and consider it to be a step back in regards to singleplayer games not to mention highly detrimental to modding(how are you supposed to mod something to your hearts content if you can't even access it? Also to be specific, I'm speaking of corporate controlled streaming here, not whatever the Average Joe can use on their own machinery since that's still under their control(as in streaming from their own pc)). Plus the other thing was specifically aimed at the concept of having an fps on a phone, streaming or otherwise, given you'd have to deal with the touchscreen or drag around a controller plus an adapter.

1. Console games can't be modded anyway and I imagine this service is only going to apply to console games.
2. They put a FPS on a phone because it's Microsoft. They needed a game to demo and what else would they use apart from the latest Halo game? It's less "we felt this was the best use of the technology" and more "ohmahgurd its halo!!1one1"

There's no such thing as a bad movement in technology. Streaming is the current "in" thing to do right now so whatever anyone brings the table is going to be good for the medium as a whole. Sure maybe I'm just being optimistic, and maybe Microsoft will sod this up royally, but I still think this may be a good thing at the end of the day. Even if I don't want to partake of it personally I know many people will find good use out of it.

It's an even worse idea on consoles especially given how it'll affect consumer rights and the fact that the internet at large just ain't gonna support it very well anytime soon. Fair enough on number 2 though.

Streaming is in for who exactly? Can't be the consumer since whenever it's brought up within reach of them the only thing I see is bitching and complaints about it(for good reasons). That said I'm not sure I agree on what you say about tech, but I suppose it depends more on who it ends up in the hands of.

Deshin:

GrinningCat:
I literally just answered that very same thing a post before you. I don't care about streaming. I don't care about the cloud. I don't care about SteamOS either. I live in a rural area, so my internet gets taxed enough as it is.

Edit: Would you prefer me to say 'Oh, sure, you'll stream it to us, but you won't actually give it to us? It's pretty much the same thing as what I originally said, given this is Microsoft and they're well-known for treating PC gamers like yesterday's news.

You must've posted right before I did then because I didn't see your post at all. Ok sure when you put it like that it does sound bad but I'm looking at it this way: We're able to keep past libraries of console video games alive and accessible on more than just the default devices they came on. Right now if I wanted to play Timesplitters I'd have to bust my old PS2 out. What if I don't have a PS2 anymore? What if it's broken? What if my disc is scratched and ebay doesn't have any? It's certainly not an ideal service but it's a step in the right direction imo if they manage to apply this on a very broad spectrum. Of course there're always emulators and roms to keep libraries alive that way; this is just the "legal" way of doing it and also offloading all the processing power offsite (ie: ACTUALLY using cloud computing as opposed to all their other claptrap they've said so far) if you have a node not capable of handling the emulation.

Now, I'm only going to speak for me. If my PS2 was broken (which I don't have because I've got a PS3 Fatty), I'd get a new one. They're cheap and plentiful, with millions still in circulation and millions ever going to be in circulation due to the popularity of the console. After all, they only just stopped making them this January.

If my disc was scratched up, I can take it to a game shop and get it buffed up for $5. I've already done this multiple times and it's made some of my scratched games that were unplayable good as new again.

If you want the cloud, that's good for you. I'm not going to stop you or your wants and I generally encourage technology to keep moving. It's great that 'the cloud' is being developed as maybe one day it'll actually be useful for me, but right now and for the next some odd years, it's not going to be useful for me at all and I just want to play my games.

Why not simply port halo 4 to pc ffs? Gotta be easier than steaming and all the shenanigans to get it working.

I'm genuinely sad that MS gave up on PC gaming. I honestly believe that the entire industry would be vastly different of they hadn't.

No name for it yet? Well if anyone at MS is reading may I suggest "Microsoft River"?

KingsGambit:
Why not simply port halo 4 to pc ffs? Gotta be easier than steaming and all the shenanigans to get it working.

I'm genuinely sad that MS gave up on PC gaming. I honestly believe that the entire industry would be vastly different of they hadn't.

You miss the point of this. It's not to find a way to play Halo 4 on a phone, it's a way to stream a game over the Internet with relatively low latency. Halo 4 just makes a convenient demonstration piece. The article says MS hinted at this tech being used for backward compatibility.

Furthermore, it seems to me that lately MS is having something of a resurgence of support for PC gaming. They may not be especially interested in putting Halo on Windows but next year's Titanfall and Project Spark will be. Is two out of three not enough?

TiberiusEsuriens:
Either way I consider this a good thing, if not for anything else than competition. It means a bigger push to actually make something worthwhile at cheaper prices.

I am to wonder how the cities and nations of the world with slow internet and restrictive data caps would be able to manage such a service.

amaranth_dru:
I think you folks missed the point. It was a tech demo, not a "We're bringing Halo 4 to phones" demo. Meaning they have the tech and can stream games to mobile devices AND (if you read the fucking article) low-end PC's with minimal latency. Future of gaming? Maybe not, but it may be a relief for people who can't afford a high-end PC and still want to play games. Of course, reading comprehension is tossed out the window because its an article about Microsoft...

So much this. I would like to see some Halo games on the PC too but that' ship's ******* sailed. Get a 360 if you want to play them or go home and stop complaining. 360's are getting cheaper and cheaper these days too so there's almost no reason not to get one if you want to play Halo.

008Zulu:
How long would a phone's battery last with the wifi radio on and constantly streaming a game like Halo 4? Two hours, maybe? Would be simpler to just play the game on the console, or, make a PC port to take advantage of the higher performance they are capable of.

It's all well and good both Steam and Microsoft making streaming devices, but the battery life of phones and tablets means that serious gamers (CoD, Halo, GTA, etc multiplayers which seem to be the core of Microsoft's latest gaming push) won't adopt it.

TO be honest the batteries are already crap. i watch couple movies, maybe do some gaming and it already doesnt last me a week. i would kill for having a twice as capable battery even if it would be twice as large. stupid people pushing for thin phones, when what they should be pushing is for big ass batteries.

008Zulu:

TiberiusEsuriens:
Either way I consider this a good thing, if not for anything else than competition. It means a bigger push to actually make something worthwhile at cheaper prices.

I am to wonder how the cities and nations of the world with slow internet and restrictive data caps would be able to manage such a service.

The simplest answer is "They can't."

However, again in order to compete they may start pushing download speed/data compression, requiring less data to be passed at a time so weaker networks can manage. If one provider can get the stream service to a restrictive area it will drive all others to improve their services as well.

Arnoxthe1:

amaranth_dru:
I think you folks missed the point. It was a tech demo, not a "We're bringing Halo 4 to phones" demo. Meaning they have the tech and can stream games to mobile devices AND (if you read the fucking article) low-end PC's with minimal latency. Future of gaming? Maybe not, but it may be a relief for people who can't afford a high-end PC and still want to play games. Of course, reading comprehension is tossed out the window because its an article about Microsoft...

So much this. I would like to see some Halo games on the PC too but that' ship's ******* sailed. Get a 360 if you want to play them or go home and stop complaining. 360's are getting cheaper and cheaper these days too so there's almost no reason not to get one if you want to play Halo.

Not everyone has enough disposable income to buy a system for just 1 game/ 1 game series. Who cares how cheap they've become, $100 is still a lot of money. Tired of people telling PC gamers to stop complaining, we (almost) NEVER get ports from console exclusives yet the reverse ALWAYS happens. Sure, life's not fair, and I accept that, but it is still annoying.

clippen05:
Not everyone has enough disposable income to buy a system for just 1 game/ 1 game series. Who cares how cheap they've become, $100 is still a lot of money. Tired of people telling PC gamers to stop complaining, we (almost) NEVER get ports from console exclusives yet the reverse ALWAYS happens. Sure, life's not fair, and I accept that, but it is still annoying.

While you may not get certain console games, you also have a better platform to play them on. Furthermore, if you can spend $300 or more on a custom PC, you can spend a little bit of money to get a cheap console if you really wanted to. And besides, with the 360, you can play all Halo games. Even if you took out Backwards Compatibility (which Microsoft made sure that Halo: CE and Halo 2 would work with it just fine above all other games), you will still have Halo 3, Halo: ODST, Halo: Reach, and Halo 4. So with Halo, it's not just one game.

 

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