Oculus Finds A Fix For "Simulation Sickness"

Oculus Finds A Fix For "Simulation Sickness"

Oculus Rift's CEO talks about how to avoid puking with VR goggles on.

Every new stage of immersive entertainment has various issues to overcome. While 2D games are pretty simple to process, 3D graphics, especially in first-person, take some exposure to get used to. The body can often react violently when what it sees and what it feels don't match up. VR tech, like the Oculus Rift, has the potential to really mess with the mind in whole new ways. Oculus CEO Brendan Iribe admits that even he gets sick strapping the goggles to his head, something they call "simulation sickness", but they think they know how to fix it.

"I've gotten sick every time I've tried it. Every time until recently," Iribe said at the Gaming Insider's conference in San Francisco. "In the last few weeks, I stayed in it for 45 minute sessions and I did not get sick with the new prototype. We are at the edge of bringing you no motion sickness content."

The remedy involves overcoming a host of hardware challenges. Resolution, latency, persistence, field of view, and judder all play a part in making sure you keep your lunch down.

Iribe thinks that overcoming that hurdle isn't just important for Oculus, but for the entire medium. In his talk, he compared it to John Carmack's original Doom engine. It wasn't perfect, but it was an important leap forward for 3D engine technology. The comparison's particularly interesting, as Carmack's now working full-time at Oculus.

Once simulation sickness gets ironed out, Iribe predicts that the Oculus Rift could be used as a general-purpose "IMAX viewer", not just a gimmick. "This is day zero. We are at the very beginning of VR," Iribe said. "This is the future of gaming as we see it.

Source: Polygon

Permalink

This is good news.
I had a five minute demo of the oculus at an expo the other week and while I was fine with it my friend had to sit down for a while immediately after due to nausea. Glad it's been worked on.

Its surprising to see that nausea surprised them, funny how they are trying to stick a new label on it when its simply motion sickness. Its a well documented medical fact if there is a disconnect between what the body feels and the other senses perceive the inevitable result for some people is chundering.

InvaderTim:
This is good news.
I had a five minute demo of the oculus at an expo the other week and while I was fine with it my friend had to sit down for a while immediately after due to nausea. Glad it's been worked on.

Not to mention the fact that people like myself can't play FPS games due to simulator sickness. It's always been obvious to me that VR is the answer to it, but if not done right, of course, it can instead make it worse.

If they've really solved the issue, then this is the Holy Grail of gaming found at last.

As long as there's an Occulus-less option for people who can't stand it or just plainly don't like it, it'll be fine.

Here's hoping for awesomeness.

plus there are smaller issues to iron out as well. where looking down and not seeing a body, etc or being in a flight sim and seeing the pilot moving say the joystick but you know its not your hands are both apparently very disconcerting for alot of people.

i hope it pans out and its the first time i would actively consider getting a vr system but i hope it doesnt end up as just another gimmic

By god a developer that acknowledges their problems, is the apocalypse upon us?
I'm glad they understand the remaining problems because even the tiny group of people who got dev kits are already professing it's perfection and blindly denying faults.

you'd think they would have learnt a few lessons when they tried the exact same thing 1995 with the Nintendo virtual boy.

Findlebob:
you'd think they would have learnt a few lessons when they tried the exact same thing 1995 with the Nintendo virtual boy.

Whys that? A lot of people never used the thing, and these guys didnt work on it themselves. And you cant really take lessons from something nearly 20 years old thats only vaguely connected and without being able to get direct data.

I've heard a few reports that the fancy moving seats that some cinemas are fitting can reduce the motion sickness some get from certain types of film. That there is movement that connects with the motion can be enough to keep the brain on the straight and narrow.

Could the Future of gaming as we see it hurry up?

It's good these thigns are being ironed out. It implies a level of dedication beyond that of a gimmick, aye.

But does it HAVE to be in 3D? Some people are born with bad eye sight, and unfortunately cannot view 3D without immediate pain and dizziness.

I love my 3DS but I have to use it in 2D, because the 3D really hurts my eyes when viewed through my glasses.

I do not think this is the future of gaming, and I actually do not think VR will ever exist. It's a pipe dream like flying cars and cybernetic implants. It will cost too much for the common man and that's why it DOESN'T exist.

Because with enough money anything CAN exist.... but not for everyone.

While I'm really glad they fixed that up, one must ask- this should've of been the VERY FIRST THING to fix. The very first. It's not simulation sickness, it's motion sickness and that should of come before you start asking devs for any sort of games to come in.

Not something regulated to second priority. Also, the most people have used of the OR is 5-10 minute demos at various conventions and expos.

Some people could handle it at the 5 minute mark. But most people don't game for 5 minutes. They often game for 30 minutes- and hour, how are they going to handle it then?

I'm really wondering if they are taking any pointers from the Virtual Boy at all? Because the OR has a lot more than motion sickness to deal with- though it definitely can be one of it's biggest weaknesses

Great that they have made headway on this problem. Weird though that they never mentioned it before in any of the articles ive read. Motion sickness seems like the kind of thing someone would have mentioned.

michael87cn:
I actually do not think VR will ever exist. It's a pipe dream like flying cars and cybernetic implants. It will cost too much for the common man and that's why it DOESN'T exist.

Because with enough money anything CAN exist.... but not for everyone.

I applaud you for considering Economics but would disagree with you. While Im not sure how useful VR will become, even if too costly for the average man (Not sure why when the average man seems to have a HD tv) it could follow the Arcade/Theater model of renting.

Mentioning cybernetic implants seems out of place in your post (did you mean like a smartphone chip in your head?), as they already exist and are economical in their very limited markets (medicine). As they become more useful, smaller and cheaper (Moor's law)(Economies of scale and new fabrication techniques) they can only get more popular.

I remember hearing stories of basic 3d games like Mario 64 making people sick. I can only imagine that feeling is amplified with the Oculus. Hears hoping their fix holds true for most people that want to enjoy it.

It was weird, I get motion sickness on a lot of games, but when I tried the Oculus rift, there was nothing. However they may have been the fact it hurt like hell to wear.

Playing videogames like this is a toss up for me: it really comes down to how well depth is presented rather then the 3D itself. FPS used to be a problem for me in 2D, but nowadays I barely even notice.

Baldr:
It was weird, I get motion sickness on a lot of games, but when I tried the Oculus rift, there was nothing. However they may have been the fact it hurt like hell to wear.

Pain has a way of focusing the mind.

They're Idiots. It's like the fools in the Movie Industry that thought that 48 fps would fix the 3D motion sickness with The Hobbit. It might work for some as a placebo. Anyone who claims to have a solution to the "issue" is ether an idiot for not doing a proper scientific sample to prove their point, or is an idiot for not selling it to Hollywood for billions.

What seems to work for a few will probably just make it worse for others. Fixing Resolution, latency, persistence, field of view, and judder doesn't actually fix the cause. It's caused by your eyes saying your moving, and your ears, and body, saying your not. That basic contradiction is the CAUSE of motion sickness, but in reverse of the normal cause which is your ears saying your moving and your eyes saying your not. It's not "simulation" sickness it's motion sickness, and it's cause is well documented if they'd bother to actually read up on it.

frizzlebyte:

InvaderTim:
This is good news.
I had a five minute demo of the oculus at an expo the other week and while I was fine with it my friend had to sit down for a while immediately after due to nausea. Glad it's been worked on.

Not to mention the fact that people like myself can't play FPS games due to simulator sickness. It's always been obvious to me that VR is the answer to it, but if not done right, of course, it can instead make it worse.

If they've really solved the issue, then this is the Holy Grail of gaming found at last.

Baldr:
It was weird, I get motion sickness on a lot of games, but when I tried the Oculus rift, there was nothing. However they may have been the fact it hurt like hell to wear.

I'm relieved to find I'm not the only one, although I never thought it was just me no one else I know personally has had the same issue as me. It seems to depend a lot on the game engine and how it handles the camera. Oddly I can play most shooters but can't watch other people play.

I attempted to play a demo of the Stanley Parable, I got through it but felt dizzy for a couple of hours.

I've missed out on quite a lot of decent games as a result so I wouldn't mind fix but I'm not sure if the Oculus Rift would be a solution. Hopefully I'll get the opportunity to try before I buy.

So what is the remedy exactly? All I see is marketing blurb.

I do not get motion sickness with any normal game however I have experienced it once whilst using Kinect for head tracking with Forza 4. I've used other head tracking devices on the PC and had no problems, however the latency with Kinect really threw a curveball and I just wasn't able to continue lest I chundered all over the floor.

I frequently hear of latency issues with OR, if it is that bad I don't think I will be able to use it. As said above, I'm really not prone to motion sickness so I'd imagine there's a hell of a lot of people out there who won't be able to use it at all if these issues aren't addressed.

Aww, I was hoping it would say how they fixed it. Does this mean they reduced latency to zero? Maybe tweaked their LCD to give truer-to-life motion blur? Perhaps something completely different? I'm down with anything, but I'd love to know what they actually did..

P.S. Thanks

IanDavis:
"I've gotten sick every time I've tried it. Every time until recently," Iribe said at the Gaming Insider's conference in San Francisco. "In the last few weeks, I stayed in it for 45 minute sessions and I did not get sick with the new prototype. We are at the edge of bringing you no motion sickness content."

The remedy involves overcoming a host of hardware challenges. Resolution, latency, persistence, field of view, and judder all play a part in making sure you keep your lunch down.

Iribe thinks that overcoming that hurdle isn't just important for Oculus, but for the entire medium. In his talk, he compared it to John Carmack's original Doom engine. It wasn't perfect, but it was an important leap forward for 3D engine technology. The comparison's particularly interesting, as Carmack's now working full-time at Oculus.

Once simulation sickness gets ironed out, Iribe predicts that the Oculus Rift could be used as a general-purpose "IMAX viewer", not just a gimmick. "This is day zero. We are at the very beginning of VR," Iribe said. "This is the future of gaming as we see it.

He said no such thing, it is being largely misrepresented by the press: http://www.reddit.com/r/oculus/comments/1onsc9/oculus_rift_will_not_cause_motion_sickness_with/

Palmer Luckey (founder of Oculus) also commented:

That is because this article paraphrases the speech in a way that is not completely accurate. There are other factors he does not mention, and resolution has never been characterized as critical in solving simulator sickness.

What he said was just that the new Updates have stopped him from getting sick, they are very well aware of the problems though.

It's different from person to person. I've had the Dev Kit for a few months now and I can't say I've ever had a problem with getting sick or nausea in general other than the one induced by extreme games (flying around in a looping 10x+ with a plane will make everyone feel nauseous). I was pretty much "immune" to it from the get-go although I do know that the problem exists since my brother for instance has it in specific game demos (especially those that don't have some sort of fixed point and have your body moving around freely like in FPS).
Most of the friends I've demoed it to didn't have much of a problem either, I demo-ed it for a few for several hours on the first day they had it on with lots of different game demos and they didn't have much problems albeit they were also big "FPS players" in general. One of the girlfriends had a problem with it right away though, she literally put it on and took it off 5 seconds later in the "Rift Coaster" demo.

What I've generally found is that people get used to it within a time period of 1-3 weeks though, and then they can use it like everyone else (it was compared to sea sickness when on a boat in getting your "sea legs" and that seems rather accurate).

I'm sure they'll also improve the design in general so it'll work much better in the consumer version (higher resolution - I'm hoping 25601400, less latency, higher refresh rate, better FoV, removing motion blur with low persistence displays and their positional tracking system delivering better and more believable positional data to the brain).

They've basically talked about all of this and all but confirmed it, the "Dev Kit" version is what they've built together in their garage before Oculus was even a company and they didn't know how the KickStarter will go and now they're tirelessly working on making and delivering the best product they can for the lowest price possible, a lot of it will depend on if they can get a good partner that can offer them cheap displays to their specs for a good price.

And it is indeed not "motion sickness" but "simulator sickness", people who have motion sickness can be left entirely unphased by the Rift experience and people who have never had motion sickness in their life can get nauseous very fast.

Dexter111:

And it is indeed not "motion sickness" but "simulator sickness", people who have motion sickness can be left entirely unphased by the Rift experience and people who have never had motion sickness in their life can get nauseous very fast.

Nope. Simulator sickness is just a buzz word. The medical term is Motion Sickness, and covers all the alternative names; seasickness, car sickness, simulation sickness or airsickness. Hiding the truth about what it is only deludes people. There is also no "getting used to it" for a significant number of people. If you've ever been in the Navy on ship for 6 months you'd know that for many people there is no period where it just goes away. It's all a matter of degree. Some people are really susceptible to it, and some people aren't that much.

medv4380:

Dexter111:

And it is indeed not "motion sickness" but "simulator sickness", people who have motion sickness can be left entirely unphased by the Rift experience and people who have never had motion sickness in their life can get nauseous very fast.

Nope. Simulator sickness is just a buzz word. The medical term is Motion Sickness, and covers all the alternative names; seasickness, car sickness, simulation sickness or airsickness. Hiding the truth about what it is only deludes people. There is also no "getting used to it" for a significant number of people. If you've ever been in the Navy on ship for 6 months you'd know that for many people there is no period where it just goes away. It's all a matter of degree. Some people are really susceptible to it, and some people aren't that much.

Except it's not and it's a different phenomenon: http://www.cyberedge.com/info_r_a+p05_ss-es.html and a lot of people that get "motion sick" very quick don't get "simulation sickness" while wearing HMD and the other way around. It's kind of like the polar opposite as all the other stuff you describe is motion that your body feels but cannot see while in VR environments you see motion but often don't feel it.
And it does go away after 2-3 weeks of getting used to it, getting slightly better each time from observing people that had it at first but didn't have problems after about that time period.

But I'm sure you're an expert since people that have actually experienced it and people dedicated to solving said phenomenon and professionally working on it don't know any better...

Dexter111:
Except it's not and it's a different phenomenon: http://www.cyberedge.com/info_r_a+p05_ss-es.html and a lot of people that get "motion sick" very quick don't get "simulation sickness" while wearing HMD and the other way around.
And it does go away after 2-3 weeks of getting used to it, getting slightly better each time.

But I'm sure you're an expert since people that have actually experienced it and people dedicated to solving said phenomenon and professionally working on it don't know any better...

Except that's a study from 1995 that clearly "concludes"

Although there is debate as to the exact cause or causes of simulator sickness

At that point in time they didn't know what it was.

How about a dictionary term for the medical definition of Simulator Sickness
http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Simulation+sickness

Motion sickness is the uncomfortable dizziness, nausea, and vomiting that people experience when their sense of balance and equilibrium is disturbed by constant motion. Riding in a car, aboard a ship or boat, or riding on a swing all cause stimulation of the vestibular system and visual stimulation that often leads to discomfort. While motion sickness can be bothersome, it is not a serious illness, and can be prevented.

Notice how it redirects you to Motion Sickness because Simulator Sickness is Motion Sickness.

There are 3 types of Motion Sickness
Type 1) Your Ears are telling your brain you're moving and your eyes are telling you you're still.
Type 2) Your Eyes are telling your brain you're moving and your ears are telling you you're still.
Type 3) Your Eyes are telling your brain you're moving in one direction and your ears are telling you you're moving in a different direction.

And if you understand Physics and Vectors you know that Type 3 is type 1 and 2 because it's a meaningless semantic difference between not moving and having motion in a different vector.

They are ALL motion sickness, and have the same Root Cause. Give the brain contradictory sensory data and it gets sick.

Hmm, that's great news.

I'm glad they realize the potential of this being an IMAX viewer. That alone makes this a fantastic home entertainment option. I'd personally love the idea of it being compatible with netflix or cable TV someday.

 

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Register for a free account here