Complete Dinosaur Skeleton for Sale in British Auction

Complete Dinosaur Skeleton for Sale in British Auction

The giant skeleton of a Diplodocus longus is to be auctioned off next month and could go for as much as $1million.

Dinosaur fossils are usually very difficult to obtain. The amount of specialist equipment required to excavate them from the ground, along with the time required to delicately clean and restore them means that researchers are usually the only people who go through the painstaking process. Luckily for the general public, many of these specimens get donated to museums for all to see. But now, a rare dinosaur skeleton is to be put up for auction, presenting a unique opportunity for you to buy your own dinosaur.

The 55ft-long specimen of the long-necked Diplodocus longus is being sold at Summers Place Auctions in Billingshurst, West Sussex, on November 27th. It is believed to be the first sale at a UK auction of a large dinosaur skeleton, according to experts. The 19ft-tall female skeleton, nicknamed "Misty", was found back in 2009 almost completely intact by the sons of paleontologist Raimund Albersdoerfer near a quarry in Wyoming in the United States. Albersdoerfer had been taking part in an excavation when he sent his sons away to dig in an area nearby "to get them off his back." To the surprise of their father, Benjamin and Jacob returned at the end of the day and revealed they had found a large bone. Nine weeks later, the entire dig team had uncovered "Misty" and sent her off to be painstakingly prepared at a leading fossil laboratory in Holland before being assembled in the UK. The skeleton will now be sold, with estimates ranging from $650,000 to $1million.

It is part of Summer Place's Evolution Sale, which is being curated by natural history expert and author, Errol Fuller. He has written a series of books on extinct creatures and said on the subject of the Diplodocus longus: "There are probably about six of these in the great museums of the world, including in Pittsburgh and Washington. You are talking about a very rare item indeed. Even if you were lucky enough to find one in the first place, the digging out and the preparation then involved is an enormous undertaking." Mr Fuller goes on to say that the skeleton could appeal to one of the emerging museums in the Far East or Middle East, or as an addition to a private collection of someone with great wealth.

Although a mere few might be able to participate in the later stages of this auction, it is still amazing to have the opportunity to own a pre-historic giant that roamed the planet 150 million years ago. We know what you're thinking - it would look great in the living room!

Source: Summer Place Auctions via The Independent

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I would have thought that the dinosaur would have been owned by the state unless you had a permit to dig it up, though.

As much as I would love to have a giant dinosaur skeleton in my living room, I can't see myself shelling out 1 million.

I agree that it should stay in a museum.

thaluikhain:

I would have thought that the dinosaur would have been owned by the state unless you had a permit to dig it up, though.

Paleontologists(like the guy whos kids found this) are generally very good about getting permits before they go out. And yes, it really does belong in a museum.

the doom cannon:

thaluikhain:

I would have thought that the dinosaur would have been owned by the state unless you had a permit to dig it up, though.

Paleontologists(like the guy whos kids found this) are generally very good about getting permits before they go out.

A permit to carefully dig the thing out I could understand...to keep the thing afterwards, instead of it going to the state, or to a museum the state favoured, not so much.

It depends on where the dinosaur is found. If it is dug up on private land, it is private property, and can be sold like anything else. No different than finding a gold mine or oil deposit in your back yard.

thaluikhain:

the doom cannon:

thaluikhain:

I would have thought that the dinosaur would have been owned by the state unless you had a permit to dig it up, though.

Paleontologists(like the guy whos kids found this) are generally very good about getting permits before they go out.

A permit to carefully dig the thing out I could understand...to keep the thing afterwards, instead of it going to the state, or to a museum the state favoured, not so much.

After doing some quick research, the guy runs a commercial fossil excavation/preparation of fossils company. So essentially he gets a permit for his company, goes out looking, finds something, digs it up, preps it, then sells to the highest bidder. Hes giving the opportunity to museums to buy the things hes bringing in, so ive got no problems with it

Another article lists the quarry as privately owned - does this help clear up discussions of who owns the dinosaur?

I personally agree with many people here, it belongs in a museum!

I'm not so sure this does belong in a museum. There are so many thousands of things languishing about in museum basements, and although this would almost undoubtedly be displayed, this would be at the cost of a whole host of things that people had no idea even existed. I'd rather this went to a private collector, who would actually enjoy it, than have it being ignored as a centrepiece in a museum.

I mean, how many dinosaur skeletons are currently under lock and key? It's not like this one being sold will affect the rest.

I wonder how the purchaser will maintain it... does it come with an instruction manual? Maybe an IKEA guide to putting it together? Special dinosaur bone polish? The logistics of keeping a skeleton are fascinating.

I would think if you were rich you could probably have a replica dinosaur skeleton created for cheaper which would look just as good and wouldn't require constant maintenance like a real skeleton. Something to consider for those of you who plan on winning the lottery.

 

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