The Last Door Tries Its Luck On Greenlight

The Last Door Tries Its Luck On Greenlight

Pixellated point-and-click horror adventure The Last Door is now seeking the green light on Steam Greenlight.

The Game Kitchen, the Spanish indie studio behind the point-and-click adventure The Last Door, mused back in September about releasing a standalone version of the currently browser-based game. The idea, Raul Diez explained, would be to combine the first three or four chapters into a "season," which would presumably be followed by future compilation seasons as they were available - something similar to what Telltale has done with The Walking Dead and Sam and Max franchises.

Diez was a little vague about the whole thing at the time but it clearly wasn't just idle talk, as The Last Door is now up for voting on Steam Greenlight. If approved, the Steam release will compile the first three chapters of the game, which launches philosophy professor Jeremiah Devitt on a dark adventure across late 19th-century England following the receipt of a distressing letter from an old friend.

Inspired by the works of Lovecraft and Poe, The Last Door is a far more immersive experience than its low-res graphics might suggest. And if you feel any doubt, you can try before you buy, although in this case the "buy" is really just throwing it a thumbs-up on Greenlight: browser-based versions of the first two chapters are now freely available to all. Access to chapter three can be purchased by supporting the development of the fourth, which is currently underway.

Source: Steam Greenlight

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I checked out chapter 1 in my browser a little while back. It's pretty good, but it suffers from the Broken Sword curse, a lot of the time you have to click every pixel to find a hidden item which ends up being used in a way that makes no sense at all. The low graphics don't hurt the atmosphere they managed to build up though and it's worth a look, but if it's priced anywhere above $5 it'll be taking the piss.

pixelated

Okay, enough of this. Can the indies get off the fake pixel art bandwagon for one second ? I know it's really convenient for the art pipeline but goddamit, not every indie game needs to be this kind of pixelated artstyle to convey what it needs to convey. It comes out more as lazy now than anything, if not slightly pretentious or represents a case of "nostalgia goggles"

I thought the games were fun though I'm not a fan of it being pixelated. Hopefully it'll get greenlit.

AldUK:
I checked out chapter 1 in my browser a little while back. It's pretty good, but it suffers from the Broken Sword curse, a lot of the time you have to click every pixel to find a hidden item which ends up being used in a way that makes no sense at all. The low graphics don't hurt the atmosphere they managed to build up though and it's worth a look, but if it's priced anywhere above $5 it'll be taking the piss.

I didn't think Broken Sword was anywhere near the worse offender for that. Maybe that's because I'm use to the Sierra games and those were sadistic in comparison to what we have today.

porous_shield:
I didn't think Broken Sword was anywhere near the worse offender for that. Maybe that's because I'm use to the Sierra games and those were sadistic in comparison to what we have today.

I played Siberia, trust me I know that pain. :)

Busard:

pixelated

Okay, enough of this. Can the indies get off the fake pixel art bandwagon for one second ? I know it's really convenient for the art pipeline but goddamit, not every indie game needs to be this kind of pixelated artstyle to convey what it needs to convey. It comes out more as lazy now than anything, if not slightly pretentious or represents a case of "nostalgia goggles"

Well, as you know Fantasy literature in the 19st C deal with the coherence struggle of the common, ordinary universe: writers do that by creating a scenario where you don't really know if what its happening is real or magic (vague descriptions, psychotic pov, incomprehensible phenomenons that "could" happen but you don't understand...)
Maybe the pixel thing helps the analogy take place, by, againg, doing the stuff up brackets.

I'm so in love with this series.

 

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