Bundle of Holding Rolls "Biggest Bundle Yet"

Bundle of Holding Rolls "Biggest Bundle Yet"

Dungeon World Cover

Bundle of Holding's Thanksgiving deal includes such award-winning games as Apocalypse World and Dungeon World.

Thanksgiving and Black Friday deals are pretty common right now, with Steam, GOG.com, and even the Humble Store each offering their own unique variations. Now tabletop players can get into the action with Bundle of Holding's Indie Cornucopia. If you missed any previous bundles, just know that Bundle of Holding is to tabletop gaming what the Humble Bundle is to electronic: A limited time, pay-what-you-want deal on a unique collection of pen-and-paper RPGs. And this time, Bundle of Holding is getting into the Black Friday market with what it calls "the largest, the most impressive, the most spectacular [Bundle] we've ever offered".

Unlike Bundle of Holding's recent Old-School revival, this particular package offers modern indie games in the form of seven popular ebooks. The deal starts out right with Apocalypse World, D. Vincent Baker's award-winning game about carving out a life in the post-apocalypse. Next there's Dungeon World, a love letter to old-school fantasy games that uses the Apocalypse World system. Adventures on Dungeon Planet builds onto Dungeon World with a science-fiction supplement, pushing your game in a universe of 20th Century pulp sensibilities. Saga of the Icelanders, meanwhile, applies Apocalypse World mechanics to 10th Century Viking settlers, with an emphasis on culture and historical accuracy.

Moving away from Apocalypse World rules, Perfect dives into steampunk dystopias, focusing on criminals being investigated by the government. Speaking of criminals, Durance is a science-fiction game about the inhabitants of an off-world penal colony written by Fiasco's Jason Morningstar. Finally, Nova Praxis is a post-singularity game of transhuman sci-fi, set after augmented humans abandoned Earth to colonize the stars.

As with any Bundle of Holding, we can expect additional games to be added over the course its remaining five days. Even if that's not the case, Dungeon World alone is worth paying attention to, as it currently sits at #8 of 100 on DriveThruRPG's Top Products list. Combined with the rest of the collection, you'll have no shortage of modern tabletop games to play once you've taken stock of your many holiday purchases.

Source: Bundle of Holding

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The average purchase price is really higher than the Humble Bundles.

Wait, I'm confused, so are these tabletop games or choose your own adventure books?

I can highly recommend Dungeon World, it's a hell of a lot of fun once you can wrap your head around its basic structure.

DasDestroyer:
Wait, I'm confused, so are these tabletop games or choose your own adventure books?

TableTop RPG's for the most part, if you're not familiar with them it's generally "Board Games with no Board". Especially Durance, since it plays more like a form of Board Game than it does a standard RPG (a lot like Morningstars' previous work Fiasco)

Yes Durance seem very interesting. This is the one that is tempting me. (I already own Apocalypse World :).

Yeah in a sense you can say that roleplaying games are a mix of storytelling and board games.

It was too tempting to resist. And now, between this and the Bundle of Nerves, I officially have more indie RPGs that I'm ever going to have the time and company to play.

PedroSteckecilo:
I can highly recommend Dungeon World, it's a hell of a lot of fun once you can wrap your head around its basic structure.

DasDestroyer:
Wait, I'm confused, so are these tabletop games or choose your own adventure books?

TableTop RPG's for the most part, if you're not familiar with them it's generally "Board Games with no Board". Especially Durance, since it plays more like a form of Board Game than it does a standard RPG (a lot like Morningstars' previous work Fiasco)

Ah, I get it now, thanks!
Also is it worth picking this bundle up if I don't have any friends that are interested in this sort of thing? Essentially, can they be played by yourself?

plugav:
I officially have more indie RPGs that I'm ever going to have the time and company to play.

So true! That the main flaw of indie RPGs. Finding the time & the people to play them. :P

DasDestroyer:

Also is it worth picking this bundle up if I don't have any friends that are interested in this sort of thing? Essentially, can they be played by yourself?

No you can't play solo. You need at least 1 player to play (if you are the game master). But must games are ideal for 3 or 4 players + the game master.
But hey some games are really interesting to read. If you are curious about RPG, Apocalypse World explain how to play in detail and in quite a interesting way (well most of them do ;).

Cedric Plante:

DasDestroyer:

Also is it worth picking this bundle up if I don't have any friends that are interested in this sort of thing? Essentially, can they be played by yourself?

No you can't play solo. You need at least 1 player to play (if you are the game master). But must games are ideal for 3 or 4 players + the game master.
But hey some games are really interesting to read. If you are curious about RPG, Apocalypse World explain how to play in detail and in a quite interesting way.

Well at only $7 for the whole set, I might just pick it up for curiosity's sake, and who knows, maybe I'll find someone to play with at some point.

DasDestroyer:
Well at only $7 for the whole set, I might just pick it up for curiosity's sake, and who knows, maybe I'll find someone to play with at some point.

Check For Traps is a great column about tabletop games, especially if you're just starting out. For example:

The Guide for New Tabletop Players

and

How to Find a Gaming Group

plugav:
It was too tempting to resist. And now, between this and the Bundle of Nerves, I officially have more indie RPGs that I'm ever going to have the time and company to play.

Cedric Plante:
So true! That the main flaw of indie RPGs. Finding the time & the people to play them. :P

I treat tabletop books the way some people treat cookbooks. I may not use everything inside, but it can give me some great ideas for whatever I do put together.

Can anyone explain to me, what is special about the Apocalypse World system compared to other systems like Shadowrun or D&D? I had a look at the demo rules on their website, but I can't even figure out which dice to use :-|

fractal_butterfly:
Can anyone explain to me, what is special about the Apocalypse World system compared to other systems like Shadowrun or D&D? I had a look at the demo rules on their website, but I can't even figure out which dice to use :-|

Apocalypse World games usually strike a good balance between running an old-school sandbox and avoiding heavy stats and number crunching. That makes it a lot easier for new players to get started right away while making prep easier on the GM.

Can't speak for all AW games, but the core game uses 2 six-sided dice. After rolling and adding your stat, rolling less than 6 fails, 7-9 is a partial success, and 10+ is a full success.

Fanghawk:
I treat tabletop books the way some people treat cookbooks. I may not use everything inside, but it can give me some great ideas for whatever I do put together.

I like the approach too, it's working great for my Mage: The Ascension game and my rare one-shots. But the thing that interests me about indies like Apocalypse World or Durance is the mechanics - they appear to play differently from traditional games. And I'd like a chance to test it all before I start fiddling with it. Meanwhile, my regular players are starved for their regular campaign.

Still, I shouldn't complain. A lot of interesting reading ahead of me.

Fanghawk:

fractal_butterfly:
Can anyone explain to me, what is special about the Apocalypse World system compared to other systems like Shadowrun or D&D? I had a look at the demo rules on their website, but I can't even figure out which dice to use :-|

Apocalypse World games usually strike a good balance between running an old-school sandbox and avoiding heavy stats and number crunching. That makes it a lot easier for new players to get started right away while making prep easier on the GM.

Can't speak for all AW games, but the core game uses 2 six-sided dice. After rolling and adding your stat, rolling less than 6 fails, 7-9 is a partial success, and 10+ is a full success.

Thank you very much, that was the answer I needed :) I think I will rather stick to D&D 4e, since it is equally easy to play (and also VERY easy to Game Master), and I am now quite used to it.

 

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