Hollywood Studios To Collect $80 Million Damages From Hotfile

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Hollywood Studios To Collect $80 Million Damages From Hotfile

Hotfile's safe harbor defense collapsed, and after that there was no hope.

If you're one of the many who gets their movies from Hotfile, you may have noticed that the site's shut down. The file locker has closed its virtual doors after losing a major legal battle with the MPAA. Hotfile has settled rather than endure a legal rout, and will pay an $80 million fine to Hollywood. It has also been ordered to cease operations until it implements copyright filtering technologies.

Hotfile relied on the safe harbor provisions of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, arguing that it was all right so long as it removed offending materials when notified of a problem. However it failed to demonstrate that it had done anything substantial to prevent infringement. Judge Kathleen Williams described the extent of infringement as "staggering" but, despite receiving 8 million infringement notices for 5 million users, Hotfile had only terminated the accounts of 43 by the time the lawsuit was filed.

Hotfile launched in 2009 and has 5.3 million reigistered users, which - given the estimated 90.2% infringing or highly infringing Hotfile downloads made each day - suggests that the vast majority of those users are involved in copyright infringement.

Hotfile works by 'hiding' its files in plain sight, providing a link with no file name or description. It's up to the user to share links and titles, but each file is unsecured, available to anyone with a net connection. A file can be downloaded multiple times, with no restriction. The MPAA, in papers filed prior to the trial, has described it as "indistinguishable" from Megaupload. Kim Dotcom has yet to have his extradition case dealt with.

"This judgment by the court is another important step toward protecting an Internet that works for everyone," says the MPAA's Chris Dodd. "Sites like Hotfile that illegally profit off of the creativity and hard work of others do a serious disservice to audiences, who deserve high-quality, legitimate viewing experiences online."

Source: Guardian

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The day they give us a way to watch movies/shows/etc, with ease, the day this stops being a problem. At least here in the UK, services like Netflix are shockingly poor, last time I checked their library I think they had one season of Star Trek Voyager (or some other similarly oldish sci-fi show) and this was in 2012.

The U.S is better, but until they start putting out films on release, and shows as they're aired, this is going to continue, because people want entertainment immediately, and if the service provided by pirates is better than that you have to pay for, people are going to pick the one that's free.

On the topic of Hotfile, trying to block sites like this is like trying to fight a hydra, there are already about twelve other sites people can use that come to mind immediately, on top of that there are torrents, on top of that there's still people in the street that peddle ripped DvDs.

Provide a better service than pirates and most people will stop pirating.

As it stands, if you pirate something you get it:

Free
Without ads
Shareable with friends
Without an anti piracy warning
DRM Free

And you can get it as soon as it's released to the cinema instead of having to wait a few months after it's been out for it to be released on DVD (Why the fuck are they still making us wait for this bullshit?), and it's available world wide.

Plus you can keep it forever.

If they only thing I had to put up was paying a bit of cash, I'd see no problem with buying a movie.

Elate:
The day they give us a way to watch movies/shows/etc, with ease, the day this stops being a problem. At least here in the UK, services like Netflix are shockingly poor, last time I checked their library I think they had one season of Star Trek Voyager (or some other similarly oldish sci-fi show) and this was in 2012.

The U.S is better, but until they start putting out films on release, and shows as they're aired, this is going to continue, because people want entertainment immediately, and if the service provided by pirates is better than that you have to pay for, people are going to pick the one that's free.

I have changed my DNS server on my 360, so I have the American Netflix, Arrow and Supernatural FTW! Also, I seem to get american DLC to, which is nice xD

OT: Never even heard of HotFile, but they might as well of not done anything, taking down one site isn't going to help at all, there are thousands of others.

So if i were to post a link to a pirated game as a comment right here, that would be grounds to shut down escapist?
Yeah, thats some sick laws you got there.
In fact, have you taken significant action to reduce the amount of copyright avatars on here? no? well i guess your next then. Because thats how stupid copyright laws are.

ALso its funny how they claim damages when no damages could exist becuase people who pirate in most cases cannot even legally obtain the item if they wanted to (as in - they are not being sold). Actually, does anyone know a legal digital download website where i can buy movies and download them legally[1]? Because i sure dont.
So since there is absolutely no way to get the product otherwise, even if noone pirated you would still be earning a round 0 from them, so where are the damages coming from?

capcha: find answer?
no, no i did not.

[1] has to have at least decent library

Genocidicles:
Provide a better service than pirates and most people will stop pirating.

As it stands, if you pirate something you get it:

Free
Without ads
Shareable with friends
Without an anti piracy warning
DRM Free

And you can get it as soon as it's released to the cinema instead of having to wait a few months after it's been out for it to be released on DVD (Why the fuck are they still making us wait for this bullshit?), and it's available world wide.

Plus you can keep it forever.

If they only thing I had to put up was paying a bit of cash, I'd see no problem with buying a movie.

Recording from a cinema is poor quality though, i'd rather pay for Netflix and get the occasional DVD than watch a film only to find out half way through someone has stood up to go to the toilet :')

If these Hollywood companies spent half the money they waste on all these legal fees then they'd probably be able to deliver a more reliable, high quality service that would entice the pirates to use.

In stead they create shoddy systems that benefit only the producers and spam users with ads and anti-piracy warnings treating their few paying customers like potential thieves.

It's really no wonder people turn to piracy when they're suspected of being one by default. If you're gonna do the time, might as well do the crime.

Strazdas:
So if i were to post a link to a pirated game as a comment right here, that would be grounds to shut down escapist?
Yeah, thats some sick laws you got there.
In fact, have you taken significant action to reduce the amount of copyright avatars on here? no? well i guess your next then. Because thats how stupid copyright laws are.

ALso its funny how they claim damages when no damages could exist becuase people who pirate in most cases cannot even legally obtain the item if they wanted to (as in - they are not being sold). Actually, does anyone know a legal digital download website where i can buy movies and download them legally[1]? Because i sure dont.
So since there is absolutely no way to get the product otherwise, even if noone pirated you would still be earning a round 0 from them, so where are the damages coming from?

capcha: find answer?
no, no i did not.

No it would not be a grounds for shutting down the escapists. A judge a capable of making a distinction between a site that has 1.6 complaints per user and has banned 43 accounts, out 5 of million users and a site that takes clear action against piracy. Hotfile has not demonstrated a reasonable willingness to deal with complaints which is why the site has had damages awarded against it. The Escapist has a clear policy on links to piracy and enforces it rigorously.

Just because you don't have access to something why do you think that entitles you to pirate it. If they stop selling a model of car that does not give you the right to take one.

[1] has to have at least decent library

arc1991:

Genocidicles:
Provide a better service than pirates and most people will stop pirating.

As it stands, if you pirate something you get it:

Free
Without ads
Shareable with friends
Without an anti piracy warning
DRM Free

And you can get it as soon as it's released to the cinema instead of having to wait a few months after it's been out for it to be released on DVD (Why the fuck are they still making us wait for this bullshit?), and it's available world wide.

Plus you can keep it forever.

If they only thing I had to put up was paying a bit of cash, I'd see no problem with buying a movie.

Recording from a cinema is poor quality though, i'd rather pay for Netflix and get the occasional DVD than watch a film only to find out half way through someone has stood up to go to the toilet :')

Except you can get the file for the projector of the theater or at least compressed version of it.

albino boo:
Just because you don't have access to something why do you think that entitles you to pirate it. If they stop selling a model of car that does not give you the right to take one.

Because why the hell can't they make it available to everyone? This isn't like making an old car where it takes up space on a production line that could be used for newer cars.

It's literally data, and they could sell it on iTunes or Amazon or whatever (worldwide) at no cost of their own. In fact they'd make more money than just holding it back like the cunts they are.

Genocidicles:

albino boo:
Just because you don't have access to something why do you think that entitles you to pirate it. If they stop selling a model of car that does not give you the right to take one.

Because why the hell can't they make it available to everyone? This isn't like making an old car where it takes up space on a production line that could be used for newer cars.

It's literally data, and they could sell it on iTunes or Amazon or whatever (worldwide) at no cost of their own. In fact they'd make more money than just holding it back like the cunts they are.

The people that worked on the data are entitled to royalties, its not free. If they give the data away they still have to pay the fee per copy. Even that were not the case why should anyone have to give something away for free? Its the owners choice about what they do with it, not yours. Its a piece of property and the owners have the right to use it as they see fit within the law. Its no different from a car or house in that respect. They paid for it, they get to chose.

albino boo:

The people that worked on the data are entitled to royalties, its not free. If they give the data away they still have to pay the fee per copy. Even that were not the case why should anyone have to give something away for free? Its the owners choice about what they do with it, not yours. Its a piece of property and the owners have the right to use it as they see fit within the law. Its no different from a car or house in that respect. They paid for it, they get to chose.

Who said anything about giving it away for free? If they sell it on Amazon they're still making money from it, only Amazon gets a cut of the action.

Genocidicles:

albino boo:

The people that worked on the data are entitled to royalties, its not free. If they give the data away they still have to pay the fee per copy. Even that were not the case why should anyone have to give something away for free? Its the owners choice about what they do with it, not yours. Its a piece of property and the owners have the right to use it as they see fit within the law. Its no different from a car or house in that respect. They paid for it, they get to chose.

Who said anything about giving it away for free? If they sell it on Amazon they're still making money from it, only Amazon gets a cut of the action.

Why should they if they don't want to? I chose not to sell my house, no one questions me. Its their right to chose what to do with the things they own.

Doesn't matter where they sell it, they still have to pay royalties. This becomes difficult with older material because you have to trace down the eastes of people that have died. Unless something is considered a classic, the costs outway the returns. You will bother if its 1950s Cary Grant movie but not if its 1950s boxing pic with a z lister in the lead. Film prints need clearing up and digitizing. All of which cost money. You can bet your bottom dollar of there was a profit to made they would release things.

albino boo:
Just because you don't have access to something why do you think that entitles you to pirate it. If they stop selling a model of car that does not give you the right to take one.

[...]Its no different from a car or house in that respect. They paid for it, they get to chose.

Why should they if they don't want to? I chose not to sell my house, no one questions me. Its their right to chose what to do with the things they own.

These ... are parody posts, aren't they? I mean they have to be, right?

Come ooon, you're just trying to spoof that stupid ''you wouldn't download a car'' commercial, aren'tcha? :)

albino boo:

Why should they if they don't want to? I chose not to sell my house, no one questions me. Its their right to chose what to do with the things they own.

That's a bit like having your cake and eating it too. You can't complain on one hand that people aren't giving you their money if with your other hand you're taking the means to match todays changing landscape and demand for product distribution. I'll grant you the royalties fee, but if we're going down that road, FUCK DISNEY. Why? For pushing Copyright laws past the 10 year mark into near infinity.

On an unrelated note. Can someone tell me what "Vul in: Korting Bij Marriot?" is? My Captcha is speaking foreign to me in a language I can't even pretend to understand.

Edit: 10 captchas later trying to have me decipher said language I get one that says "Winter is coming" NO, winter is HERE. Stupid non-Canadian Captcha.(Followed by another 10 captcha in said language, followed by "fezes are cool" to which i replied, No they aren't.(And got it wrong again.)

Ninmecu:

albino boo:

Why should they if they don't want to? I chose not to sell my house, no one questions me. Its their right to chose what to do with the things they own.

That's a bit like having your cake and eating it too. You can't complain on one hand that people aren't giving you their money if with your other hand you're taking the means to match todays changing landscape and demand for product distribution. I'll grant you the royalties fee, but if we're going down that road, FUCK DISNEY. Why? For pushing Copyright laws past the 10 year mark into near infinity.

On an unrelated note. Can someone tell me what "Vul in: Korting Bij Marriot?" is? My Captcha is speaking foreign to me in a language I can't even pretend to understand.

Edit: 10 captchas later trying to have me decipher said language I get one that says "Winter is coming" NO, winter is HERE. Stupid non-Canadian Captcha.(Followed by another 10 captcha in said language, followed by "fezes are cool" to which i replied, No they aren't.(And got it wrong again.)

Copyright has been between 75-100 years since its inception. Royalties are payments made by disney to the people that appear in and write the music and scripts for the film. I suggest you clam down, that way you might learn something.

albino boo:

Ninmecu:

albino boo:

Why should they if they don't want to? I chose not to sell my house, no one questions me. Its their right to chose what to do with the things they own.

That's a bit like having your cake and eating it too. You can't complain on one hand that people aren't giving you their money if with your other hand you're taking the means to match todays changing landscape and demand for product distribution. I'll grant you the royalties fee, but if we're going down that road, FUCK DISNEY. Why? For pushing Copyright laws past the 10 year mark into near infinity.

On an unrelated note. Can someone tell me what "Vul in: Korting Bij Marriot?" is? My Captcha is speaking foreign to me in a language I can't even pretend to understand.

Edit: 10 captchas later trying to have me decipher said language I get one that says "Winter is coming" NO, winter is HERE. Stupid non-Canadian Captcha.(Followed by another 10 captcha in said language, followed by "fezes are cool" to which i replied, No they aren't.(And got it wrong again.)

Copyright has been between 75-100 years since its inception. Royalties are payments made by disney to the people that appear in and write the music and scripts for the film. I suggest you clam down, that way you might learn something.

From Wikipedia:

The original length of copyright in the United States was 14 years, and it had to be explicitly applied for. If the author wished, he could apply for a second 14‑year monopoly grant, but after that the work entered the public domain, so it could be used and built upon by others.

So, yeah, you're definitely wrong about it being 75-100 years since its inception.

Also:
image

To have copyright extend past the death of the copyright holder (the current legal standard being the death of the copyright holder plus a shit ton of years) is completely asinine to begin with.

albino boo:

Genocidicles:

albino boo:

The people that worked on the data are entitled to royalties, its not free. If they give the data away they still have to pay the fee per copy. Even that were not the case why should anyone have to give something away for free? Its the owners choice about what they do with it, not yours. Its a piece of property and the owners have the right to use it as they see fit within the law. Its no different from a car or house in that respect. They paid for it, they get to chose.

Who said anything about giving it away for free? If they sell it on Amazon they're still making money from it, only Amazon gets a cut of the action.

Why should they if they don't want to? I chose not to sell my house, no one questions me. Its their right to chose what to do with the things they own.

Doesn't matter where they sell it, they still have to pay royalties. This becomes difficult with older material because you have to trace down the eastes of people that have died. Unless something is considered a classic, the costs outway the returns. You will bother if its 1950s Cary Grant movie but not if its 1950s boxing pic with a z lister in the lead. Film prints need clearing up and digitizing. All of which cost money. You can bet your bottom dollar of there was a profit to made they would release things.

True, but you can't make infinite copies of your house at 0 cost.

OT: I agree with the first few posters. Provide a better service than the pirates and you will get dem customers.

chadachada123:

albino boo:

Ninmecu:

That's a bit like having your cake and eating it too. You can't complain on one hand that people aren't giving you their money if with your other hand you're taking the means to match todays changing landscape and demand for product distribution. I'll grant you the royalties fee, but if we're going down that road, FUCK DISNEY. Why? For pushing Copyright laws past the 10 year mark into near infinity.

On an unrelated note. Can someone tell me what "Vul in: Korting Bij Marriot?" is? My Captcha is speaking foreign to me in a language I can't even pretend to understand.

Edit: 10 captchas later trying to have me decipher said language I get one that says "Winter is coming" NO, winter is HERE. Stupid non-Canadian Captcha.(Followed by another 10 captcha in said language, followed by "fezes are cool" to which i replied, No they aren't.(And got it wrong again.)

Copyright has been between 75-100 years since its inception. Royalties are payments made by disney to the people that appear in and write the music and scripts for the film. I suggest you clam down, that way you might learn something.

From Wikipedia:

The original length of copyright in the United States was 14 years, and it had to be explicitly applied for. If the author wished, he could apply for a second 14‑year monopoly grant, but after that the work entered the public domain, so it could be used and built upon by others.

So, yeah, you're definitely wrong about it being 75-100 years since its inception.

Also:
image

To have copyright extend past the death of the copyright holder (the current legal standard being the death of the copyright holder plus a shit ton of years) is completely asinine to begin with.

Look what happens when you stop swearing and look things up. Where on your list has copyright been 10 years? Anyway I was not referring to the US but the UK where it has been 100-75 years for ages. Most of europe follows the same standard, the US just increased its laws with pretty much what the rest of the world has been using anyway.

So if you build a house rent it out your family can continue getting money from it after your death but if write a book your family gets nothing? Why is creative works less inheritable than physical works?

Flames66:
True, but you can't make infinite copies of your house at 0 cost.

OT: I agree with the first few posters. Provide a better service than the pirates and you will get dem customers.

Its not zero cost for each copy sold, the film company will have to pay royalties to 3rd parties. If the film was based on a book, the author is entitled to money. Any music used, the publisher is entitled to money for each copy sold. Depending on the contract the actors could also be entitled to money. For the last 50 years or so producers, directors and lead cast members tend to be on a percentage, all them have to be paid. Which means hours of expensive lawyers digging around in files and hoping that after 50 or even 70 years the contracts are still on file. If they have died then you have to trace the heirs and pay them the money. So its not zero cost by any definition.

Strazdas:

ALso its funny how they claim damages when no damages could exist becuase people who pirate in most cases cannot even legally obtain the item if they wanted to (as in - they are not being sold). Actually, does anyone know a legal digital download website where i can buy movies and download them legally[1]? Because i sure dont.

Sure:

Xbox Video
Amazon Instant Video

Of course what counts as a "decent library" is subjective, and I'm not really familiar with what they offer in Lithuania. I think they're pretty good though.

[1] has to have at least decent library

Way to protect the hard work of other people!

Now how about you turn your attention to rectifying that situation between Fox's Glee and Jonathan Coulton?

Oh, wait, copyright law protects the rights of the party who usurped Content without crediting, recompensing, or even informing the creator of said content, all because the sort of cover license used by the original creator had no provisions, disregarding the fact that the acoustic content created for the cover was entirely original, and in no way similar to the musical accompaniment of the original artist that Fox DID pay. My mistake!

-_-

Eldritch Warlord:

Strazdas:

ALso its funny how they claim damages when no damages could exist becuase people who pirate in most cases cannot even legally obtain the item if they wanted to (as in - they are not being sold). Actually, does anyone know a legal digital download website where i can buy movies and download them legally

Sure:

Xbox Video
Amazon Instant Video

Of course what counts as a "decent library" is subjective, and I'm not really familiar with what they offer in Lithuania. I think they're pretty good though.

Amazon's digital services are VERY limited when it comes to region restriction. This is due to copyright laws preventing them from doing so.

OT: Piracy will always come out on top as long as companies keep us form getting content. I bought the DVD for the series Welcome To the NHK and it turned out it was actually region locked to such a degree that my DVD player which plays American DVDs couldn't play it. It even came with the message that it was illegal for me to watch it. I had to change my region settings and watch it on my computer in order to watch it. That was a huge disappointment to me.

Netflix is a decent service... if you're American, but again copyright laws prevent it from being accessed outside of America and while it has finally come to Europe not all the countries have access and it got nowhere near the same amount of content.

They need to either accept that some piracy will exist or make an effort to compete with it.

I'd just like a service with shows I like on it at a reasonable time.

Annoyingly, being Australian, dvds are the easiest way for me to watch things legally as foxtel is just too much money for not enough content. There is Itunes but I did not like how I can't even make an apple account without giving it my credit card details.

Even the xbox wasn't that bad.

arc1991:

Elate:
The day they give us a way to watch movies/shows/etc, with ease, the day this stops being a problem. At least here in the UK, services like Netflix are shockingly poor, last time I checked their library I think they had one season of Star Trek Voyager (or some other similarly oldish sci-fi show) and this was in 2012.

The U.S is better, but until they start putting out films on release, and shows as they're aired, this is going to continue, because people want entertainment immediately, and if the service provided by pirates is better than that you have to pay for, people are going to pick the one that's free.

I have changed my DNS server on my 360, so I have the American Netflix, Arrow and Supernatural FTW! Also, I seem to get american DLC to, which is nice xD

OT: Never even heard of HotFile, but they might as well of not done anything, taking down one site isn't going to help at all, there are thousands of others.

ooo can you tell me how to change my dns server on xbox so i can get american netflix?

OT: agreed with pretty much everyone above, if you provide a better service than pirates then people will stop!

Karloff:
"This judgment by the court is another important step toward protecting an Internet that works for everyone," says the MPAA's Chris Dodd. "Sites like Hotfile that illegally profit off of the creativity and hard work of others do a serious disservice to audiences, who deserve high-quality, legitimate viewing experiences online."

I'm sorry, but every time someone says something like that, I just get the urge to knock them out. I'm not violent or anything, but something like that just makes my skin crawl. All the "Internet that works for everyone" and "Safe internet" is just... Ugh. Why do these people not get the fact that the whole point of the internet is it being filter free, and all the "harm" you try to remove of it just backfires on you? It never works, and all it does is piss people off, yet pricks over at places like the MPAA keep trying to shove it down our throats.

This looks like a job for Dara O'Briain!

And of course, the Neil Gaiman Defense.

Face it, Hollywood. You know as well as I do IT WILL NEVER END unless you give it a reason to stop.

With regard to Hotfile, while I hate to say it I think the argument is fairly clear cut in favour of Hollywood in this instance. The facts are that Hotfile made a lot of money, predominantly by facilitating sharing *stuff* that isn't theirs to profit from and apparently made little effort to combat this. It brings to mind the rather alarming statistic that up to 25% of Nigeria's entire GDP comes from fraud/scams and as such, is not something the government wishes to crack down on.

If I created an entertainment product which other people distributed and profited from, I would feel cheated.

---------------------------

With regard to piracy, I do agree that the problem would be significantly lessened by offering better services to match what today's audiences expect. The music industry took their time but finally jumped onto the online distribution bandwagon and are now profiting (though it has meant a significant rejig of the financial model). I can speak on this topic in confidence and greater detail since meeting and listening to the CEO of Universal Music UK himself talk about this stuff.

It's very easy to find things online and Steam revolutionised gaming for many because it is easier than piracy. I can legally own and play any game in their library in approximately 10 mouse clicks. I can play them on any computer I wish, on as many computers as I wish and download at the speed limit of my connection any time I choose. I don't have to mess with cracks but can still mod my games to my heart's content. The service is better, faster, more convenient and legal and that's why it's so popular. I could easily find the things I want for free, but prefer Steam for all the reasons mentioned, hence my library is one of, if not the largest of anyone else on the Escapist.

With films/tv however, rights and what have you are the biggest issue...this also affects eBook publishing and is also why they get pirated so much. Both industries need to wake up and realise that different regional release dates, borders and what not are a thing of the past. The Internet doesn't respect them and barely acknowledges them. The sooner the filmmakers and book publishers realise the old model is outdated and start offering worldwide services, the sooner they'll start to profit from the piracy that likely claims any income they might've gotten in the absence of such a service.

To give a personal example, Futurama is my favourite TV show bar none. I'm sad that it's gone, likely for good but while it was on and aired in the US (on Comedy Central) I was enjoying it. However I had to do so through questionable means. Since I'm in the UK and the episodes weren't aired at the same time (I still don't know if they've been aired here) the ONLY way I had to watch them shortly after they were aired Stateside was with file sharing. I would have thrown money Fry-style at whoever could give me a high quality, reliable, unrestricted method for watching them legally (and without ads) but there was no such system and I can say unreservedly that there was absolutely zero chance of me waiting for it to air here. It wasn't an option, not even on the table. I was going to watch them the minute I was able by whichever method was available to me. Given the choice, I would CHOOSE to throw money at the content creators for my favourite show to demonstrate my support, reward them for entertaining me and reflect how much I adore their work. However, broadcast rights, international dates and similar nonsense meant no system available by which I could do so.

I wanted a good streaming service for ages, then i got Netflix and now i kinda realize that i prefer dvds. I don't like streaming and renting, i like to own it so that i can make sure that the movie is always available to me. Now i only watch movies on dvd and in the cinema and it works perfectly for my needs, luckily dvds are very cheap.

albino boo:

No it would not be a grounds for shutting down the escapists. A judge a capable of making a distinction between a site that has 1.6 complaints per user and has banned 43 accounts, out 5 of million users and a site that takes clear action against piracy. Hotfile has not demonstrated a reasonable willingness to deal with complaints which is why the site has had damages awarded against it. The Escapist has a clear policy on links to piracy and enforces it rigorously.

Just because you don't have access to something why do you think that entitles you to pirate it. If they stop selling a model of car that does not give you the right to take one.

I am not aware of any laws that make distinctions between the amount of pirated content on the site being "bad enough" and not enough to take legal action. Last time i heard any infringement is infringement even if its just 1 user.
UN declaration of human rights states that humans have right to culture and information. If there is no legal way to obtain it then it is a problem. your example is loaded and misconstructed. I am not taking anything if im pirating something, i would be copying the thing. If they stop selling a model of a car in my country and i would look at one driving around and build my own that would be well within my legal rights.

Capcha: make it so
no, capcha, im nto going to build a car.

Akisa:
Except you can get the file for the projector of the theater or at least compressed version of it.

If you know where one can get one good for you. From at least what public and semi-private side of pirates have acess to this is extremely rare occasion.

Eldritch Warlord:

Strazdas:

ALso its funny how they claim damages when no damages could exist becuase people who pirate in most cases cannot even legally obtain the item if they wanted to (as in - they are not being sold). Actually, does anyone know a legal digital download website where i can buy movies and download them legally[1]? Because i sure dont.

Sure:

Xbox Video
Amazon Instant Video

Of course what counts as a "decent library" is subjective, and I'm not really familiar with what they offer in Lithuania. I think they're pretty good though.

Couple things:
First Xbox.
God thats obnoxiuos website.
Xbox Live, and Xbox Video with it is not available in my country. At all. Considering the thing is over the internet this is unacceptable. there are no extra costs allowing all world to connect (other than load, but you want more users if your running a business).
I didnt knew you could download things from Xbox Video, i thought it was streaming service.

Amazon video.
Link is broken.
Amazon Instant video is limited to US. Even Netflix is better than this, but that one is still not available here (technically, VPN is your friend), and even then outside of US Netflix collection is dreadful.
From what i read on the site it is a streaming and DVD rental service, so no download.

So no, neither of those work for multiple reasons.

I repeat. Actually, does anyone know a legal digital download website where i can buy movies and download them legally.

[1] has to have at least decent library

Let me watch your tv shows online, maybe with ads before, no matter where I am, right after the show is first broadcast, for free and I won't pirate it. I will give you my ad revenue happily. Same goes for movies, perhaps with longer ads up front, or even a small fee for watching it online, especially if it was only just released in cinemas.

I do want to support the creators of shows I like, but I don't have another option unless I want to wait several months & sign up to some cable service or buy the dvd.

Ahh you can always count on Boo to be around to go to bat for those big multi billion dollar companies against those mean old consumers.

OT: Ah well, it was only a matter of time, but hey, if Hollywood and whoever provided better service it wouldnt be a problem. Make it more convenient for people to watch your stuff than to pirate it and guess what? They will watch it from you instead of taking the time to try to pirate things!

FalloutJack:
This looks like a job for Dara O'Briain!

And of course, the Neil Gaiman Defense.

Face it, Hollywood. You know as well as I do IT WILL NEVER END unless you give it a reason to stop.

And I always love Neil Gaiman, he knows what he is talking about unlike most corporate entities and their defenders. And the Data one is funny as hell, it always does piss me off when I cant skip the "dont steal this!" warning on something I just bought.

"Dont steal this!"
"No shit, can I watch the thing I paid for now?"
"Nope, you have to keep watching this."

Strazdas:

albino boo:

No it would not be a grounds for shutting down the escapists. A judge a capable of making a distinction between a site that has 1.6 complaints per user and has banned 43 accounts, out 5 of million users and a site that takes clear action against piracy. Hotfile has not demonstrated a reasonable willingness to deal with complaints which is why the site has had damages awarded against it. The Escapist has a clear policy on links to piracy and enforces it rigorously.

Just because you don't have access to something why do you think that entitles you to pirate it. If they stop selling a model of car that does not give you the right to take one.

I am not aware of any laws that make distinctions between the amount of pirated content on the site being "bad enough" and not enough to take legal action. Last time i heard any infringement is infringement even if its just 1 user.
UN declaration of human rights states that humans have right to culture and information. If there is no legal way to obtain it then it is a problem. your example is loaded and misconstructed. I am not taking anything if im pirating something, i would be copying the thing. If they stop selling a model of a car in my country and i would look at one driving around and build my own that would be well within my legal rights.

Capcha: make it so
no, capcha, im nto going to build a car.

You appear to be unaware of the concept of burden of proof. The film companies alleged that hotfile was deliberately allowing its customers to pirate. They presented the court with evidence that was the case and on the balance of probabilities the judge believed them. The legal test which the case has to pass is does the plaintiff have a fair and reasonable expectation that a hotfile should act on 8 million complaints. Fair and reasonableness been a fundamental test of common law since the 1300s and is found in all former parts of the British empire.

albino boo:

Strazdas:

albino boo:

No it would not be a grounds for shutting down the escapists. A judge a capable of making a distinction between a site that has 1.6 complaints per user and has banned 43 accounts, out 5 of million users and a site that takes clear action against piracy. Hotfile has not demonstrated a reasonable willingness to deal with complaints which is why the site has had damages awarded against it. The Escapist has a clear policy on links to piracy and enforces it rigorously.

Just because you don't have access to something why do you think that entitles you to pirate it. If they stop selling a model of car that does not give you the right to take one.

I am not aware of any laws that make distinctions between the amount of pirated content on the site being "bad enough" and not enough to take legal action. Last time i heard any infringement is infringement even if its just 1 user.
UN declaration of human rights states that humans have right to culture and information. If there is no legal way to obtain it then it is a problem. your example is loaded and misconstructed. I am not taking anything if im pirating something, i would be copying the thing. If they stop selling a model of a car in my country and i would look at one driving around and build my own that would be well within my legal rights.

Capcha: make it so
no, capcha, im nto going to build a car.

You appear to be unaware of the concept of burden of proof. The film companies alleged that hotfile was deliberately allowing its customers to pirate. They presented the court with evidence that was the case and on the balance of probabilities the judge believed them. The legal test which the case has to pass is does the plaintiff have a fair and reasonable expectation that a hotfile should act on 8 million complaints. Fair and reasonableness been a fundamental test of common law since the 1300s and is found in all former parts of the British empire.

The 8 million complains mean nothing. if you ever ran a website you would know how many times some random company bot flags your page for "Copyright infringement" and you have to prove google that you are not. burden of proof in copyright law almost always fall on the victim and not the claimee. which shows just how awful current copyright laws are.

Strazdas:

The 8 million complains mean nothing. if you ever ran a website you would know how many times some random company bot flags your page for "Copyright infringement" and you have to prove google that you are not. burden of proof in copyright law almost always fall on the victim and not the claimee. which shows just how awful current copyright laws are.

Thats job of hotfiles lawyers to dispute the validity of those complainants which clearly they failed to do so. You still fail to understand the fair and reasonable is part of standard legal argument. The lawyers for the film company presented evidence that 8 million times hotfile was hosting pirated material. Hotfile was unable to dispute the evidence and then coupled with the fact they only took action 43 cases, it represented a pattern of behavior.

the legal argument goes something like this

Is it fair reasonable for the film companies to expect action to be taken after making complaints Yes/No

Did hotfile take fair and reasonable action when complaints were made Yes/No

So hotfile received 8 million complaints which it was unable to dispute the validity of the those complaints.

Hotfile only took action with relation to 43 complaints. So they did not take fair and reasonable action. Therefore they have damages awarded against them

Now that take the case of escapist and a link being posted

Is it fair reasonable for the film companies to expect action to be taken after making complaints Yes/No

Did the escapist take fair and reasonable action when complaints were made Yes/No

So the escapist is still expected to delete links when complaints are made.

Did the escapist take fair and reasonable action when complaints were made Yes/No

the answer here is yes they did. The escapists rigorously bans accounts and deletes links voluntarily without complaints being made. This also represents a pattern a behavior. So the Escapist would not have damages awarded against them because they behave in fair and reasonable manner. If some links get missed that does matter because they showed consistent attempts to prevent copyright being violated. To expect all links to be deleted would not be fair and reasonable.

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